Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biographical Sketch of Miles Price

Miles Price, of Wales, settled in Lincoln County, N. C., prior to the revolutionary war. He married a Miss Sharp, and had a son named Thomas, who was a soldier of the revolution. He married Isabella Sharp, and they had Elizabeth, Thomas, jr., Reese, Isaac, James, John, Isabella, and Ellen Zohn married Anna Barber, of North Carolina, and they had four children previous to their removal to Missouri, viz.: Elizabeth L., Cynthia, Miles S., and Thomas J. They came to Missouri and settled in Pike County in 1819, after which they had the following children Robert B., John H., Sallie A., Emily I., and Lucinda J. All of his children except Miles S., who is a member of the County Court of Montgomery County, settled in Lincoln County. Mr. Price was Constable and Justice of the Peace in Pike County for thirty years. He was also a great snake killer, and every spring he and his neighbors would have a snake hunt. One spring they killed 9,000 rattlesnakes. Isaac Price first settled in St. Charles County, and afterward in Lincoln. He married Tabitha Wilkerson, of the former...

Biographical Sketch of Daniel Pegram

The parents of Daniel Pegram were Scotch. Daniel was born in Petersburg, Va., but settled and lived in Bedford County, where he raised ten children, six sons and four daughters, each of whom was more than six feet in height. Thomas, a son of Daniel Pegram, married Nancy Hopkins, whose mother’s maiden name was Clark, and who had a brother, Chester Clark,, who drew $100,000 in a lottery. Thomas had but three children James L., Edward T., and William. The latter died in Virginia in his 19th year. James L. married Julia R. Oley, of Virginia, and settled in St. Charles County, Mo., in 1839, and in Montgomery County in 1845. Mrs. Pegram died in 1863. They had eight children, four sons and four daughters. Edward T. Pegram married Mildred Crane, of Montgomery County, and had two children, a son and a...

Biography of Peter VanBibber

Peter and Isaac VanBibber, of Holland, came to America and settled in Botetourt Co., Va., previous to the revolution. Peter married Marguety Bounds, and they had Peter, Jr., Jesse, Jacob, James, Joseph, Matthias, Nancy, Sophronia, Ellen, and Olive. James married Jane Irvine, and settled in St. Charles County in 1803. He was Coroner at the time William Hays was killed by his son-in-law, James Davis. In 1817 he removed to Callaway County, and settled on the Auxvasse. His children were Joseph, Irvine, Frances. Lucinda, Melissa, Daniel and Minerva. Joseph was a surveyor and made the government surveys in range eight, west of the fifth principal meridian. Olive VanBibber married Nathan Boone. Isaac VanBibber, Brother of Peter, was Captain of a company in the battle of Point Pleasant, in 1774, and was killed there. He left, a widow and four children John, Peter, Isaac and Rebecca. John and Peter married and settled in Powell’s Valley, East Tennessee. Isaac was born in Greenbriar Co., Va., October 20, 1771, and was only two and a half years old when his father was killed. He was adopted and raised by Colonel Daniel Boone, and at the early age of thirteen years acted as a scout against the Indians in Virginia. In 1800 he came to Missouri with Nathan Boone, and settled first in Darst’s Bottom. During the Indian war he was Major of the militia under Col. Daniel M. Boone. He was married in 1797 to Susan Hays. In 1851 he settled at Loutre Lick, now in Montgomery County. The place was first settled by Thomas Massey, in 1813. The land was a...

Biography of Natley Dutton

Natley Dutton and wife, of England, settled in Maryland some time after Lord Baltimore began to colonize that State. Their son, Natley, Jr., was born and raised in Maryland. He had a son, named John H., who was born in 1790. Mr. Dutton died when his son was eleven years of age, and two years afterward his mother had him bound out to learn the ship carpenter’s trade. He worked at that business fourteen years. In the meantime his mother had married a Mr. Elton, whose father was a Quaker and came to America with William Penn. They had a son named Thomas T. Elton, and in 1818, he and his half-brother, John H. Dutton, in company with Philip Glover, started to Missouri. They traveled in a wagon to Wheeling, Virginia, where they bought a flat-boat, and loading their wagon and team into it, they floated clown to Maysville, Kentucky, where they traded their flat-boat for a keel-boat, transferred their property to it, and proceeded to Louisville. There they sold their boat and came by land to Missouri. They located first in St. Charles County, where they rented land and lived two years. They then entered land on North Bear creek, in Montgomery County, and settled there. Mr. Elton married Eleanor Glover, and raised a large family of children. He subsequently removed to Grant County, Wisconsin, where he now resides. Mr. Dutton married Mary Bruin, of St. Charles County, whose father settled there in 1808. They had John H., Jr., Eveline, Timothy B., Eleanor, James M., and Elizabeth. The two latter lived to be grown, but died unmarried. John...

Biographical Sketch of George Farrow

The parents of George Farrow came from Scotland, and settled in Fauquier Co., Va., where George was born. He was a soldier of the war of 1812. He married a Miss Massey, and they had George, Jr., Nimrod, John, and Benjamin also two daughters. Benjamin married Lucy Smith, of Virginia, and they had John P., George, Mortimer, Joseph, Margaret, Sarah, Liney M., Mary L., and Amanda M. John P., Sarah, and Margaret came to Missouri. Sarah married William Browning, and settled in St. Charles County, but afterward removed to Lincoln County. Margaret married James B. Barton, and settled in St. Charles County. John P. was married in Virginia, to Susan M. Smith, and settled in St. Charles County in 1836. He subsequently removed to Troy, where he was employed in a store, and in 1844 he settled in Montgomery County, where he was elected Judge of the County Court, and held the office for twenty years. He afterward removed to Crawford Co.,...

Biographical Sketch of Charles Woodruff

Charles Woodruff, of Buckingham Co., Va., married a Miss Gatewood, and their son, Wyatt P., married Mary Talphro, and settled in St. Louis Co.; Mo., in 1825. In 1827 they removed to St. Charles County, and from there to Montgomery County in 1832. They had John, Charles E., Robert H., Francis S., and David B. all of whom live in Montgomery...

Biography of Stephen Ham

Stephen Ham lived and died in Madison Co., Ky. He was the father of John, Jabez, and Stephen Ham, Jr. John was born in Kentucky in 1786, and came to Missouri in 1809, and settled in St. Charles County. He joined Nathan Boone’s company of rangers, and served during the Indian war. In 1816 he and Jonathan Crow built a bark tent on Auxvasse creek, now in Callaway County, and lived in it for some time, while they were engaged in hunting. They were, therefore, probably the first American settlers within the limits of Callaway County. Ham cut his name on a lone tree in the prairie, which has since borne his name. He was a Methodist preacher. He was married twice, first to a Miss Bennett, by whom he had two children. She died when the children were quite small, and their father took them to their relatives in Kentucky, performing the journey on horse-back, with one of the children before him and one behind. When he came to water courses that were deep enough to swim his horse, he would tie one of the children on the bank, swim across with the other, tie it, and go back for the one he had left. He afterward married a Miss Thomas, and they had six daughters. Mr. Ham was a daring hunter, and there were but few who possessed nerve enough to follow him in all his adventures. He once smoked a bear out of its cave and then knocked it in the head with an ax. In 1823 he built a house on the Auxvasse, about five...

Biographical Sketch of Hazekiah Henley

Hezekiah Henley, of Virginia, had a son named Thomas O., who was married first to Martha Bugg, by whom he had William, Samuel, Thompson, John, Nancy, Martha, and Polly. After the death of his first wife he married Mary Herndon, by whom he had Allen, Wilson, Thomas, Archibald, Schuyler, Sarah, Lucinda, Amanda, and Catharine. Samuel was married twice, and settled in St. Charles County. Allen settled in Montgomery County in 1838. He married Lucy Thomas, and they had ten...

Biographical Sketch of Richard Jones

Richard Jones, who was born in England, married a Miss Love, and settled in Botetourt Co., Va. He was a member of the Baptist Church, but had to give a hogshead of tobacco every year for the support of the Episcopal Church. The names of his children were William, John, and Silas. William married Elizabeth Metcalf, and settled first in Shelby Co., Ky., from whence he removed to Missouri and settled on Darst’s Bottom, St. Charles County, in 1818. In 1820 he removed to Callaway County, and built a horse-mill, under the shed of which the Baptists held religious services for a number of years. The mill was kept by his son, William M., who afterward became a Baptist preacher, and is now a merchant at Montgomery City. William Jones’ children were Jane, Richard, Elizabeth L., Susan, William M., Minerva, Maria, Martha, and Narcissa. Jane married Robert Saylor. Richard married Unicia Davis. He afterward died of consumption, and the day before his death he was taken to the creek, on his bed, placed in a rocking chair, and baptized, chair and all, by Jabez Ham. Elizabeth L. Jones married William McCormack. William M. married Elizabeth Jones, and they had twelve children, one of whom, Judge Robert W. Jones, has been Judge of the Probate Court of Montgomery County, and is now editor of the Standard at Montgomery City. Minerva married Anderson Hunter. Maria married Martellus Oliver. Martha married Benjamin Proctor. Narcissa married William Metcalf, of...

Biographical Sketch of Jacob Lewellyn

Jacob Lewellyn, son of Samuel Lewellyn, had a son Samuel who settled in Pike Co., Mo., at a very early date, and died in 1837. He left a son, John W., who married Jane Trabue, of Kentucky, in 1824, and had ten children, nine of whom are still living. Mr. Lewellyn lived for some time in Clarke Co., Mo., where he was Judge of the County Court for eight years. He settled in Montgomery County in 1839, having lived in St. Charles County in 1818, and in Pike County in...
Page 1 of 3123

Pin It on Pinterest