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From Kingston to Catskill along the Hudson River

Rhinecliff, with its historic Beekman stone house, is on the east bank of the river opposite Kingston. The old mansion, on the hillside, above the landing, was built before 1700 by William Beekman, first patroon of this section. It was used as a church and as a fort during the Indian struggles and still preserves the scar of a cannon ball from a British ship. Ferncliff, a mile north of the Beekman House, is the home of John Jacob Astor, formerly the property of William Astor, and above this Clifton Point, once known as the Garretson place, the noted Methodist preacher whose wife was sister of Chancellor Livingston, and above this Douglas Merritt’s home known as “Leacote.” Flatbush landing lies on the west bank opposite Ferncliff. One might almost imagine from the names of places and individuals here grouped on both banks of the river, that this reach of the Hudson was a bit of old Scotland: Montgomery Place and Annandale with its Livingstons, Donaldsons and Kidds on the east side, and Glenerie, Glasgo and Lake Katrine on the west. Barrytown is just above “Daisy Island,” on the east bank, 96 miles from New York. It is said when General Jackson was President, and this village wanted a postoffice, that he would not allow it under the name of Barrytown, from personal dislike to General Barry, and suggested another name; but the people were loyal to their old friend, and went without a postoffice until a new administration. The name of Barrytown, therefore, stands as a monument to pluck. The place was once known as Lower Red Hook Landing....

Biography of Jacob Krohn

Jacob Krohn, Freeport, is the president of the Second National bank of that city, and his careful and conservative management has made it one of the solid institutions of the North-west, for its name and reputation extend far beyond the limits of city or county. Mr. Krohn was born in Pyritz, Pomerania, Prussia, February 22, 1832, exactly one hundred years after the birth of Washington, and received his early education in the schools of his native city. When he was twenty years old he left his Prussian home to found another under more kindly auspices on the soil of the New World. He embarked on the sailing vessel ” Gutenberg,” leaving Hamburg in October, 1852, and after a long and perilous voyage of some four months landed at New York early in the following year. The vessel was much tossed about by rough and stormy winds, and came into the harbor bereft of the greater portion if not all of its sails. He was glad enough to press his foot once more upon the solid earth. He had learned the trade of making cigars, and found employment in that occupation in the cities of New York and Saugerties for some two years. He came to Chicago in 1855, and very shortly after to Freeport. This city pleased him, and he determined that his┬áhome should be here. He rented a shop and began to manufacture and sell cigars. He made good goods, was accommodating and friendly, and his trade increased so rapidly that in 1858 he was forced to seek larger quarters. In 1861 he built a large store on...

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