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Descendants of Richard Kimball of Ipswich MA

KIMBALL. Richard Kimball, of the parish of Rattlesden, County of Suffolk, England, with his family, came to New England in the ship “Elizabeth” in 1634, arriving at Boston, and thence went to Watertown, Mass. He soon became a prominent and active man in the new settlement, was proclaimed a freeman in 1635, and was proprietor in 1636-37. Soon thereafter he removed to Ipswich, where he passed the remainder of his life. His services as a wheelwright were very much appreciated. Mr. Kimball married Ursula, daughter of Henry Scott, of Rattlesden, and (second) Oct. 25, 1661, Mrs. Margaret Dow, of Hampton, N. H. He died June 22, 1675. His widow died March 1, 1676. His children, all by the first marriage, and all born in England except the youngest child, were: Abigail, Henry, Elizabeth, Richard, Mary, Martha, John, Thomas and Sarah. Richard Kimball (2), son of Richard, was born in Rattlesden, England, about 1623. He came to New England with his parents. He removed from Ipswich to Wenham, near Ladd’s Hill, in the western part of the town, and became a large land owner. He was a subscriber to the minister’s rate in 1657; Dec. 4, 1660, he was on the committee to see about building the new meetinghouse, and in 1663 was on the committee to join with the select-men to put out the new contract. With the exception of three years he served on the board of selectmen from 1658 to 1674. He owned 200 acres of land in Rowley. He died in 1676. He seemed to have served in the Indian war. His second wife was Mary...

Descendants of Rev. George Shove of Fall River, MA

SHOVE. Rev. George Shove, gentleman, son of Margery, who was admitted to the church at Boston as a widow in 1638, and who subsequently was of Rowley and a proprietor and still later of Roxbury, where she married in 1654 Richard Peacock, became the third minister of Taunton, ordained Nov. 17, 1665. Of his ministerial life little is known except that be “preached acceptably,” and taught the Taunton school; and it is said that “no rumor of strife or discord in connection with him comes down to us.” His fame, however, as a land bolder and dealer in real estate bas not failed to reach us. He is represented as having been largely concerned in the secular transactions of the town and possessed of considerable wealth. He was one of the six original proprietors of Assonet Neck, when that purchase was made in 1680. His home lot was that of William Phillips, one of the first settlers on the east side of what is now High street, between Cohannet and Winthrop streets. On July 14, 1664, Mr. Shove married Hopestill, daughter of Rev. Samuel Newman, a learned man, the distinguished minister of Rehoboth. She died March 7, 1673, and he married Feb. 17, 1674-75, Mrs. Hannah Walley. She died in September, 1685, and he married Dec. 3, 1686, Mrs. Sarah Farwell. He died April 21, 1687. His mother Margery was buried at Taunton in 1680, with note that she was “mother of Mr. George Shove.” The children of Minister Shove were: Edward, born April 28, 1665 (buried Aug. 7, 1665); Elizabeth, born Aug. 10, 1666; Seth, born Sept. 10,...

Early New England People

Sarah Titcomb over her years of study of various New England families had collected quite a bit of material of several early New England families. At the bequest of some of her friends, she prepared and published them in book form. When reading through the material I was impressed with the amount of material collected on each individual, and rather then a brief genealogical sketch, readers are provided an in-depth study of each early family: Ayer, Bartlett, Bradley, Chase, Dean, Dow, Dunster, Ellis, Fuller, Hope, Kilby, Martine, Les Dernier, Maverick, Mills, Montague, Pemberton, Pepperrell, Poore, Precott, Sewall, Longfellow, Spofford, Titcomb, Watmough, and Willard.

King William’s War – Indian Wars

The war commonly called by the colonists, “King William’s War,” commenced in 1688 and ended in 1697. The object of the French was the expulsion of the English from the northern and middle provinces. The English directed their efforts against Canada. The French secured the services of the greater part of the Indians, and the united forces spread death and desolation in all directions.

Byfield Massachusetts Parish Records

736 Byfield Massachusetts parish records recorded by a Rev. Hale from 1709-1743. These baptisms may include residents from Newbury, Rowley and Georgetown. The first pastor of the church in the parish was Rev. Moses Hale, who died Jan.16, 1743-4. The following are all the records of baptisms in the parish from the founding of the church to the time of Mr. Hale’s decease.

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