Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of James Madison Jones

James Madison Jones, the popular and efficient station agent of the Concord & Montreal Railroad at Concord, was born at Deerfield, N.H., April 26, 1833, son of James and Hannah L. (Marston) Jones. Jacob Jones, his grandfather, a native of Pittsfield, N.H., kept a successful clock and gunsmith shop in his native town for many years. He had a high local reputation as a mechanic, and he lived to a good old age. James Jones, who was born in Pittsfield, N.H., inherited his father’s mechanical talent. He took up and continued the paternal business of making and repairing clocks and executing gunsmith work, adding thereto that of a blacksmith. In the latter half of his life he removed to Concord, where he entered the employ of Abiel Chandler, the clock-maker, and soon established for himself a great local reputation in that city for skill in his line of business. He could repair any sort of machine or mechanical instrument. His useful life closed in Concord, at the age of seventy-eight years. He married Hannah L. Marston, of Pittsfield. Their family consisted of the following children: James Madison, the subject of this sketch; Thomas A., who went to Chicago, Ill., and was appointed paymaster on the Chicago & North-western Railroad; Charles E., who is an engineer on the Boston & Maine Railroad; George A., who enlisted for service in the Civil War, first at Portsmouth in the First New Hampshire Regiment of Volunteers, and subsequently for three years in Company E of the Second New Hampshire Regiment, and who was killed at the battle of Gettysburg in 1863; Frank and...

Biography of Elbridge G. Little

Elbridge G. Little was born August 5, 1807. He obtained his preliminary education at Exeter, N.H., and graduated from the Medical College at Cleveland, Ohio. He attained eminence in his profession, and in New Lisbon, Wis., where his last years were passed, he was one of the wealthiest and most prominent citizens. His wife, who was born November 4, 1809, was a daughter of Thomas and Judith (Dodge) Peabody, of the part of old Danvers, Mass., now known as Peabody. She was a sister of George Peabody, the wealthy and benevolent banker, who died in London, and who bequeathed to her son, George Peabody Little, a portion of his vast wealth. Six children were born to Dr. and Mrs. Little, George P.; Allen F., who was born August 12, 1838; and Henry C., who was born March 31, 1842. George Peabody Little was educated in the academy in Lewiston, N.Y., Pembroke Academy of Pembroke, N.H., and the gymnasium and military institute here, a branch of the Norwich Military Academy of Vermont. He taught school for one term in Pembroke, N.H., when he was eighteen years old, and the following year went to Portland, Me., where he was engaged in mercantile business some six years. The ten years ensuing he managed a photograph studio at Palmyra, N.Y., having taken a fancy to chemicals and cameras. Returning then to Pembroke, N.H., he purchased his present homestead, and turned his attention to general farming and cattle breeding. In 1868 he erected a handsome residence, a spacious barn, and other buildings. Mr. Little has about two hundred and twenty-five acres of land in...

Biography of George Oliver Locke

George Oliver Locke, of Pembroke, an ex-member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives, was born in South New Market, N.H., September 19, 1826, son of Simeon and Clarissa (Tash) Locke. His great-grand-father, David Locke, who was a native of Yorkshire, England, became an early settler in Rye, N.H., where he owned a good farm, and resided there until his death, which occurred at a good old age. Simeon Locke (first), grandfather of the subject of this sketch, followed farming in Epsom for a time. Later he moved to East Concord, N.H., and there spent the rest of his life. His habits of thrift and industry enabled him to acquire considerable property. In politics he voted with the Democratic party, but his retiring disposition would not permit him to take any active part in public affairs. He attended the Congregational church. At his death he was seventy-nine years old. He married Abigail Blake, a Epsom, who attained the age of seventy-three, and was the mother of nine children. Of these the third, Simeon Locke (second), was born in East Concord. He settled in South New Market, and there followed his calling of mechanic for the rest of his active period. He was an able business man as well as a good mechanic, and by making proper use of his opportunities he realized excellent financial results. He was a Democrat in politics, and long occupied a prominent position in public affairs in South New Market. Simeon Locke, second, reached the venerable age of ninety-two years. He was a Deacon of the Methodist church. His wife, Clarissa, who was a native...

Biography of James S. Elkins

James S. Elkins, a prominent citizen of Canterbury, N.H., was born in Rye, N.H., December 24, 1809, son of James and Mehitable (Rand) Elkins. His paternal grandfather, Samuel Elkins, was a native of Rye, where he was engaged in agriculture during the active period of his life. James Elkins was a farmer and fisherman, following the first-named occupation in Rye, where he was born May 3, 1777. He died in Canterbury, November 29, 1855. His wife, Mehitable Rand Elkins, was born in Rye, June 19, 1787, and died in Canterbury, July 20, 1859. James S., the subject of this sketch; David, born November 4, 1812, and now deceased; and Moses, born February 21, 1814, who died September 20, 1889. James S. Elkins received his education in the public schools of his native town. He remained at home, and helped on the farm until he was twenty years of age. His parents removed to Little Boar’s Head and then to Stratham, N.H., remaining four years in each place. In 1834 they moved to Canterbury. He was engaged in stone-cutting in Quincy, Gloucester, and Boston, where he helped build the First Merchants’ Exchange. In 1834 he bought a farm near the village of Canterbury. About 1873 he purchased the property where he now resides, and where for the last twenty years he has lived retired from business. In politics Mr. Elkins has always been a strong Democrat and an active politician. He served three years as Selectman, and was the Representative of his district two years, besides holding other minor offices. He has been twice married. His first wife was Abbie...

Biography of Hosea Ballou Carter

Hosea Ballou Carter, son of Susan Shannon (Merrick) Carter and Tappan Sargent Carter, was born at East Hampstead, Rockingham County, N.H., on September 5, 1834. He was educated in the public schools of Hampstead and at Atkinson Academy, where he was a classmate of General William Cogswell, of Bradford, Mass., and later of Salem, Mass. The intrinsic inwardness of modern political and legislative contests has drawn to the service of political managers and corporate magnates the sagacity, shrewdness, and fidelity of a peculiar class of men, not infrequently found in New England, especially in New Hampshire, who, being of humble or obscure origin, finding themselves unable to demonstrate or promulgate their ideas, inventions, and schemes (not possessing the capital required therefor), enter the line of service indicated for the twofold purpose of compensation and education. The subject of this sketch, born and reared among the granite hills of New Hampshire, is an exponent of what an uncultured bucolic lad from the backwoods may accomplish when sustained by an equitable supply of sand tempered with ironic silence and commonplace courtesy. At the age of ten years he had learned the trade of shoemaking to aid his father in furnishing the meagre comforts of the humble home of that industrious New England mechanic, who has for more than threescore years daily continued to toil at the work-bench, and who now, at the ripened age of eighty-three years, may be found at the shoe bench for eight hours each day, which he recognizes as the proper hours for work-day for willing labor. “Hozee,” as he is familiarly known throughout New Hampshire, leaving...

Biography of Cyrus O. Brown

Cyrus O. Brown, formerly a well-known schoolmaster and now a prosperous farmer of Epsom, was born in Kensington, N.H., August 15, 1834, son of Abel and Ruth (Fellows) Brown. On the paternal side he is a lineal descendant of John Brown, who, born in England in 1589, is said to have been of Scotch origin. It is believed that this ancestor was reared in a seaport town, as he was a ship-carpenter by trade. It is recorded that he was concerned in the building of many vessels for the king. He emigrated to New England, and became one of the first settlers of Hampton, N.H. He was married in that town in 1640 or 1641; and Benjamin, the second of his three sons, was born in Seabrook, N.H. From John Brown, born in England in 1589, the line of descent comes by Benjamin Brown, born in Seabrook, in 1647; Benjamin Brown, Jr., born in South Hampton in 1684; Jonathan Brown, born in Kensington in 1718; Abel Brown, born in Kensington in 1760; and Abel Brown, Jr., born in Kensington in 1797. Abel Brown, Sr., the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a school teacher in his younger days. Taking an active part in public affairs, he served as a Selectman, and was employed to settle many estates. He lived to the age of eighty-six years. In politics he was a Whig. He married Sally Paige, a native of Kensington, and a daughter of Stephen Paige, who was a Deacon of the Congregational church. Mrs. Abel Brown, first, lived to be eighty-two years old. She reared five children-Abel,...

Biography of Charles Mortimer Bingham

Charles Mortimer Bingham, a former well-known merchant of Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H., was born in New London, Conn., February 22, 1804, son of Nathan Bingham. His father settled in Claremont in 1809. He was a hatter by trade, and carried on a large and successful business here. He was a musician, and played the bass-viol in the Episcopal church for years. He died at the age of seventy-eight. He had six children. His daughter Lucretia married Ralph Metcalf, who became the governor of New Hampshire. Her sister Elizabeth married Luther S. Porter, and Maria became the wife of Henry W. Galpin. Silas L., one of the three sons, was a professional voice teacher. He died in Cleveland, Ohio. George, the only surviving member of the family, resides in Minneapolis, Minn. Both Elizabeth and Silas Bingham had remarkable voices. In 1818, at the age of fourteen, Charles Mortimer Bingham began to fit himself for a business career by entering the employ of Josiah Stevens & Sons, dealers in general merchandise, his father, Nathan Bingham, having made an agreement with the firm that, under certain conditions, he should remain with them until twenty-one years of age. We copy, with a few verbal corrections, the following well-told story of his life and character: “A typical New Englander, having completed his term of service with Josiah Stevens, he struck out for himself. He left Claremont with little capital, but with a good deal of honest purpose, and engaged in business in Greenbush, Vt. From thence he went to Chester, where he did a thriving business until 1837, when he was induced by friends...

Biography of Francis W. Blake

Francis W. Blake, one of Pittsfield’s successful farmers, was born in Hampton Falls, N.H., September 3, 1837, son of Enoch and Lydia (Smith) Blake. The family is of English origin. Its founder, Jasper Blake, who came from England in 1640 and settled at Hampton, N.H., was a relative of Robert Blake, the famous British admiral of that period. The great-grandfather of Francis W. was Jeremiah Blake, son of Joshua. He was a native of Hampton Falls, and a farmer by occupation. He was the father of five children, of whom Enoch (first), the grandfather, was the eldest. Enoch Blake (first) was born in Hampton Falls, and grew to manhood as a farmer in that town. He served in the Revolutionary War under General Stark. In 1787 he moved to Pittsfield, and occupied a part of the farm now owned by his grandson, Francis W. In politics he was a Democrat, and in religious belief he was a Free Will Baptist. At his death he was sixty-nine years old. He married Hannah Eastman, a native of Kensington, N.H. Of their five children who attained maturity Enoch (second) was the eldest. Born in Pittsfield, August 22, 1796, he was engaged in agricultural pursuits during the greater part of his active period, and also followed the trades of carpenter and cooper to some extent. Prosperity rewarded his industry. In politics he supported the Democratic party. His last years were passed in retirement, and he lived to the advanced age of ninety-one years. Having been a soldier in the War of 1812, he was in receipt of a government pension at the time...

Biography of Sherburn Josiah Winslow

Sherburn Josiah Winslow, one of the most prominent business men and influential residents of Pittsfield, was born in Nottingham, N.H., March 16, 1834, son of Josiah and Ruth (Tucker) Winslow. By both paternal grandparents, each of whom was a Winslow, he is directly descended from Governor Edward Winslow, who came with the Pilgrims in the “Mayflower.” The grandfather, Elisha Winslow, was a prosperous farmer of Nottingham, and lived to a good old age. He was the father of six children, all now deceased. Josiah Winslow, the second child and the eldest son of Elisha, was born in Nottingham, November 12, 1797. He was reared to farm life, but learned the tanner’s and shoemaker’s trades, which he followed for many years. He finally moved to Pittsfield, and his last days were spent upon the farm in this town. A citizen of more than ordinary worth, he acquired a high reputation for honesty. He was a supporter of the Democratic party, and took a lively interest in local politics. His wife, Ruth, whose father, James Tucker, was born in Salisbury, Mass., April 15, 1766, became the mother of four children, namely: Sally T., deceased; James T., deceased; Sherburn J., the subject of this sketch; and Atilla J., deceased. James T. married Fanny Hall, of Illiana, Ill., and had one son, James Albert. Josiah Winslow died at the age of sixty-six years, and his wife lived to be sixty-seven. They were members of the Free Will Baptist church. Sherburn Josiah Winslow began his education in the common schools, and completed his studies at the Pittsfield Academy. Subsequently in 1856, after teaching school...

Biography of James Yeaton

James Yeaton, a well-known farmer of Epsom, Merrimack County, was born in this town, January 11, 1832, son of John and Sarah (Bickford) Yeaton. His ancestors for several generations were prosperous farmers in this State; and his great-grandfather, John Yeaton (first), was a pioneer settler in Epsom. John Yeaton, second, grandfather of James, was a native of this town, and resided here his entire life. A successful farmer, he accumulated considerable property. He was a Democrat in politics and a Congregationalist in his religious views. At his death he was about eighty-one years old. He was three times married. His first wife, whose maiden name was Bickford, died at the age of twenty-five. Of her two sons who attained maturity, John was the elder. The father married for his second wife a Miss Towle, who had three children, none of whom are living. His third marriage, which was made with the widow of William Yeaton, resulted in no children. John Yeaton, third, was born in Epsom, March 29, 1804. He was reared to farming, which he followed successfully during his active period; and he died at the age of seventy-six years, leaving a good estate. He was one of the prominent men of his day. While not an office-seeker for himself, he took an active part in securing the election of capable officials. In politics he acted with the Free Soil party, but later became a Republican. He was a member of the Free Will Baptist church. His first wife, Sarah Bickford Yeaton, whom he married December 25, 1828, was a daughter of Samuel Bickford, of Epsom. She died...
Page 2 of 41234

Pin It on Pinterest