Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biographical Sketch of Joseph A. Wickham

Joseph A. Wickham was born in Monroe, Michigan, November 14, 1844. When he arrived at the age of ten years his father died, and he left his native place and went to Brunswick, Chariton county, Missouri, to live with an uncle. There he lived for five years and attended the common schools of that place. In 1861 he served in the Missouri State Guards under General John B. Clark, and in 1862 went to Norwalk, Huron county, Ohio, to finish the jeweler’s trade under James A. Wilkinson, with whom he worked a year before leaving Brunswick. In 1863 he enlisted in Company C, Sixty-eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, served during the war; was mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, and received his honorable discharge at Cleveland, Ohio, in 1865. Returning to Norwalk he was engaged by his old employer in the jewelry business, and remained with him until the following February, when, he removed to Richmond, Missouri, and established himself in the jewelry business. In Richmond he remained until 1872, then came to Gallatin and opened his present drug and jewelry store. Mr. Wickham was elected mayor of Gallatin in 1875 and reelected in 1876. In the spring of 1877 he was appointed city treasurer of Gallatin, and is now serving his fifth consecutive term in that responsible office of trust, honored and held in universal esteem by the citizens of Gallatin. On the first day of February, 1872, Mr. Wickham was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Cunningham, of Richmond, Missouri. They have four children; Frank, Alfred, Herbert and Charles. Mrs. Wickham is a member of the Old School Presbyterian...

Biography of Hon. Samuel A. Richardson

Samuel A. Richardson was born in Anderson county, Kentucky, July 26, 1826. He was the second son of Colonel John C. Richardson, who was a native of Virginia, but in early life moved from that State to Anderson county, Kentucky, and in the spring of 1831, with his family, moved to Missouri and settled in the Missouri River bottom, above Camden, in Ray county, and afterwards removed to near Lexington. The family are descendants of the numerous family of Richardsons, from Virginia and Kentucky. Judge Nathaniel Richardson, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, moved from Kentucky and settled in Lewis county, this State; and Samuel Arbuckle, grandfather on his mother’s side, also moved from Kentucky to Missouri at an early day and located in Ray county. They both lived to an advanced age and left large families in their respective localities. Samuel A. Richardson was a robust, healthy boy, inured to all the hard-ships of frontier life, and with his elder brothers and the assistance of four negro boys, helped his father in opening up and improving three farms in the Missouri bottoms. He became proficient as a prairie-breaker and ox-driver, and broke hemp, split rails, and was especially fond of hunting. Up to his fifteenth or sixteenth year he attended school but little, his father needing his assistance. Afterward he attended the Richmond, Missouri, high school, and received a very good start in the elements of an English education, and in Latin, Greek, and the higher mathematics. In the early part of 1845 he attended the State University at Columbia, Missouri, where he completed a select course...

Biography of Independence Mann

Independence Mann, The subject of this sketch was born near Hancock, in the State of Maryland, on the 4th day of July, 1843, and is the son of Jonathan E. and Mary A. (Brosins) Mann, natives of Marlyand. At an early age, in company with his parents, he removed to this county and received the greater part of his education in the excellent schools of Gallatin. He began his business career as a clerk in the dry goods store of T. J. Casey, at Richmond, Missouri. At the commencement of the Civil War, prompted by a spirit of patriotic devotion to his adopted State, Mr. Mann responded to her governor’s first call for volunteers and enlisted in May, 1861, in Colonel Reeve’s regiment of General Sterling Price’s command. In defense of principles he believed just, our subject fought bravely and well, throughout the entire war. He followed the “crimson banner of stars and bars ” through the battles of Carthage, Wilson’s Creek, Lexington, Pea Ridge, Cape Girardeau, Potosi, and Pilot Knob. At Pea Ridge he was disabled by a wound and fell into the hands of the enemy. After lying in the hospital for about two months, he was exchanged and joined General Joe. O. Shelby’s cavalry brigade, with whom he continued until the close of the war, and then, “when the people’s hopes were dead” and the banner he loved so well was furled forever, Mr. Mann laid down his arms, with his comrades, at Shreveport, Louisiana, and returning to Richmond, Missouri, resumed the peaceful avocation of a merchant in that place. He located in Jamesport in 1872,...

Pin It on Pinterest