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Biography of Marcus D. Wright

One of the most successful and progressive businessmen of Idaho, and the leading landowner of Kootenai county, is Marcus D. Wright, of Rathdrum. He was born in Kentucky, April 16, 1851, and is a son of John W. and Mary (Gipson) Wright, both of whom were likewise natives of Kentucky. The father died in Illinois, at the age of sixty-four years, but the mother is still living, at the age of eighty-seven, and is a resident of Germantown, Kentucky. Of their seven children six yet survive. Marcus D. Wright was reared in Kentucky and acquired his education in the public schools there. At the age of seventeen he left his native state and went to Missouri, making his home in St. Joseph until he had attained his majority. In 1871 he went to Montana, in which state he lived for six years, and in 1877 he removed to Spokane, Washington. In 1881 he came to what is now Kootenai county, Idaho, locating on the present site of the town of Rathdrum, with whose interests he has since been prominently identified. He was one of the first merchants of the place, and for thirteen years he has been engaged in furnishing railroad ties, under contract, to the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, which he has supplied with more than three million ties in that period. The period of his mercantile career here covers eleven years. He has a well selected stock of general merchandise, and commands an excellent patronage by reason of his courtesy, his enterprise and his reliable business methods. He is also the most extensive landowner in Kootenai county,...

Biography of Charles L. Heitman

The influence of culture and broad professional and worldly experience upon a new community is visible in Idaho as the result of the work and the example of high-minded men like Charles L. Heitman of Rathdrum, Kootenai county, a lawyer who does honor to the law, to the courts, to himself and to the people among whom he lives and whose interests it devolves upon him to serve from day to day. Charles L. Heitman comes of an old North Carolina family, and is a son of Henry N. and Eve (McCrary) Heitman. His father was for sixty years a local preacher of the Methodist Episcopal Church, south, and for twenty years was clerk of the superior court of Davidson County. He died at the age of eighty-three years, his wife at sixty-five, and they are buried in the land of their birth and life. Charles L. Heitman was educated at Trinity College, in Randolph County, North Carolina, and was graduated at the head of his class, in 1876. During the succeeding two years he read law under the preceptorship of Chief Justice Pearson, at Richmond Hill, North Carolina. He was admitted to the bar of his native state in 1878 and practiced his profession at Lexington nine years. In 1890 he went to Idaho and located at Rathdrum, which then had a history covering nine years more or less, and he has attained a standing at the bar of Idaho second to that of no lawyer in the state. He is an unswerving Republican and takes an active part in the affairs of his party in his county...

Biography of John C. Brady

The profession of teaching is one which develops a man symmetrically, affords him opportunity for study and thought and fits him for the higher duties of citizenship in a manner thoroughly logical and rational. The successful teacher is a lover of popular enlightenment, and to be that he must be himself enlightened and patriotic. When teachers come to public office they bring to the service of the public a broadminded grasp of affairs and a capacity for work which make them useful, influential and respected. John C. Brady was born in Cedar county, Iowa, May 19, 1863, a son of Hugh and Mary (McClintock) Brady, who are living in Keokuk county, Iowa, respected by all who know them, and prosperous in temporal affairs. Mr. Brady attended the public schools near his home and was graduated from the Northern Indiana Normal School, at Valparaiso, in 1884. From that time until in 1898 he was teaching school almost continuously, in Iowa, Montana and Idaho. He came to Rathdrum, Kootenai county, Idaho, in 1894, was for four years principal of the schools of that town and came to be known as one of the most devoted and successful educators in the state. In November 1898, he was, as a Democrat, elected to the office of judge of probate of Kootenai County, an office, which he is administering with much ability and good judgment and with the approbation of the general public, without regard to political alliances. He was called to the position by a majority large enough to attest great personal popularity, for he is exceptionally progressive and public-spirited and has a...

Biography of Louis E. Eilert

The new west is eminently the home of the self-made man. Indeed, it may be said that in making himself the self-made man of the new west has built the new west up about him. Of course this means the self-made man in a collective sense. Individually self-made men like Louis E. Eilert, of Rathdrum, Kootenai County, Idaho, are units in the scheme of moral and material development and progress. Louis E. Eilert is a native of Hanover, Germany, and was born April 5, 1851, a son of Ernest and Mary Eilert, descendants from a long line of German ancestors. In 1852 Ernest Eilert started for America with his wife and his son (then about a year old), with such plans in his mind as a man will make for those whose lives he wants to make better, without regard to the sacrifices he may be called upon to make in his efforts to the end. But he was doomed to bitter disappointment at the very outset. His wife died on the voyage and was buried in the Atlantic Ocean. But still duty lay plainly enough before him. Emigrants and pioneers may not have time for mourning their dead, for they have a fight to wage for the living. One may scarcely imagine how lonely the journey was of Mr. Eilert to the new land, after that dark day in his history, and across a land to him unknown to Wisconsin, where he settled on Wood river, in Waukesha county. There the boy Louis was reared and taught a good deal about work and not much about books. The...

Wilcox, Mary Ellen Ware – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Mary Ellen Wilcox, 97, of La Grande, died Aug. 1 at a local care center. A funeral service will begin at 2 p.m. Aug. 14 at Daniels-Knopp Funeral, Cremation & Life Celebration Center. Burial will follow at the Summerville Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Union County Senior Center in La Grande. A full obituary will be available later. The Observer ā€“ August 6, 2008 _________________________________ Mary Ellen (Ware) Wilcox, 97, of La Grande, died Aug. 1. A funeral service will begin at 2 p.m. Thursday at Daniels-Knopp Funeral, Cremation & Life Celebration Center. Burial will follow at the Summerville Cemetery. A reception begins at 3:30 p.m. at the La Grande Retirement Center, 1612 Seventh Street. Mary Ellen was born March 18, 1911, in Rathdrum, Idaho. She married Raymond Wilcox Feb. 2, 1954. They retired to the La Grande area. Raymond preceded her in death. Mary loved to paint landscape pictures of places around the La Grande area. She started painting at the age of 66 and painted until she could no longer see. Survivors include son, John Leslie Hays of Portland; daughters, Donna Mae Eimstad of Eugene and Carol Marie Earle of Oakdale, Calif.; daughter-in-law, Jacquie Hays of La Grande; 15 grandchildren; 39 great-grandchildren; and seven great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her son, William Thomas Hays, who died in January 2008. The Observer ā€“ August 13,...

Titus, Gertrude – Obituary

Union, Oregon Gertrude Titus, 97, of Union, died Oct. 24 at a local care center. Daniels-Knopp Funeral, Cremation & Life Celebration Center is in charge of arrangements. La Grande Observer – October 26, 2009 ________________________ Local Funerals and Visitations Oct. 29 – Gertrude Titus, celebration of life, 10 a.m., Union United Methodist Church; La Grande Observer – October 28, 2009, Union Cemetery _____________________________ Gertrude Helen Titus, 97, of Union, died Oct. 24 at a local care center. A celebration of life will begin at 10 a.m. Thursday at the Union Methodist Church. Burial will follow at the Union Cemetery. Daniels-Knopp Funeral, Cremation & Life Celebration Center is in charge of arrangements. Gertrude was born Nov. 13, 1911, to Conrad John and Marie Margaret (Horch) Schuetz in Odessa, Wash. She was one of 10 children and helped with her siblings growing up in Ritzville, Wash., and then Rathdrum, Idaho, where she graduated from high school. On March 28, 1936, she married Marvin W. Titus in La Grande. They lived at Haines and on a ranch near Telocaset before moving to Union in 1940. Over the years she worked at almost every business in Union, the drug store, Union Hotel, hardware store, Ben Franklin and even baked pies for the Knotty Pine cafe. She was the fire chief’s wife for 32 years and was always helping around the fire station. The couple was involved in the community but Gertrude also gave much time to the schools with PTA and being room mother many times. The Union High School Class of 1960 elected Marvin and Gertrude Citizens of the Year. She was...

White, Floyd – Obituary

Floyd White, 69, Rathdrum, Idaho, died April 15, 2007, in Coeur dā€™ Alene, Idaho. A funeral service will be held Saturday, April 21, 2007, 3:30 p.m., at Coles Funeral Home, Baker City, Ore. Viewing will be at Coles Funeral Home on April 20, 2 p.m. 5 p.m. Interment will be at Mt. Hope Cemetery in Baker City. Arrangements are under the direction of Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place Street, Baker City, OR 97814. Used with permission from: The Record Courier, Baker City, Oregon, April, 2007 Transcribed by: Belva...

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