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Biography of Milton J. Hopkins, M. D.

The thinking man recognizes the fact that character and ability will come to the front anywhere and especially in professional life are the honors and emoluments won only through individual effort and talent. A most creditable position has been reached by Dr. Milton J. Hopkins, physician and surgeon of St. Louis, who was born in Blissfield, Michigan, November 29, 1859, his parents being Samuel and Susannah (Loar) Hopkins. The father, a native of West Virginia, was descended from an old Massachusetts family, the ancestral line being traced back directly to Rev. Samuel Hopkins, who was the great-grandfather of Dr. Hopkins of this review and who was a prominent Calvinist. The record indicates that for two hundred years the family has numbered among its representatives members of the ministry. Samuel Hopkins, father of Dr. Hopkins, became a farmer and carpenter and resided in Michigan to the time of his death, which occurred in 1902 when he was eighty-four years of age, for he was born in the year 1818. His wife was a native of Maryland and she, too, was descended from one of the old families of Massachusetts of English descent. Her mother was among the very first white children born west of the Alleghany mountains. Both the father and mother of Dr. Hopkins were descended from Revolutionary war ancestors. Mrs. Hopkins, who was born April 22, 1819, died in 1908, at the age of eighty-nine years. She was the mother of eleven children, four sons and seven daughters, all of whom reached adult age. Dr. Hopkins of this review, who was the youngest in the family, pursued a...

Biography of Ira I. Cammack

Ira I. Cammack, who has devoted the greater part of his life to educational work, has done valuable service in the capacity of superintendent of schools in Kansas City, which position he still holds. He was born at Deming, Hamilton county, Indiana, on the 16th of February, 1858, his parents being James and Edith J. Cammack, who were pioneer settlers of eastern Indiana, taking up their abode in Randolph county. They held birthright membership in the Friends church and were prominently identified therewith throughout their entire lives. The father brought the first steam sawmills to central Indiana. Joseph Pearson, the maternal grandfather of Ira I. Cammack, had the first station of underground railroad north of Cambridge City, Indiana, where Levi Coffin, the reputed president of the underground railroad, lived and operated. Ira I. Cammack obtained his elementary education in the country schools and subsequently became a student in the Union High Academy, which was conducted under the auspices of the Friends church of Westfield, Indiana, and from which he was graduated in 1879. During the following year he attended Valparaiso University. His first teaching experience was gained in the rural schools of Hamilton county, Indiana. Following the completion of his high school course he took charge of the Sugar Plain school west of Thorntown, Indiana, a combination of public and Friends school. Later he assisted as a student in the Union high school and in 1881 entered Earlham College as both student and teacher. He served for two years in that capacity and during one year as librarian and student, being graduated in 1884. The following year was spent...

Biography of Hon. Granville Hogan

When the city boy crosses swords with the country lad in the struggle for ascendency, the odds are against him. There is something in the daily habits of the farm bred boy-the early rising, the necessity to make each blow tell-which develops in him a sturdiness and determination that count as most forceful factors in the world’s work when coupled with persistency and laudable ambition. This statement finds verification in the life record of Hon. Granville Hogan, judge of the circuit court of St. Louis, who was born October 20, 1878, at Merrimac, Kentucky, a son of the late Thomas Hogan, who was likewise born in the Blue Grass state and belonged to one of its old families that was founded in Virginia about two hundred and fifty years ago. The family is of Irish lineage and representatives of the name participated in the Revolutionary war. With the western emigration the Hogan family became connected with the pioneer development of Kentucky, where Thomas Hogan was afterward a successful farmer and stock raiser and also engaged in the tobacco business. He passed away at Merrimac, Kentucky, February 8, 1896. He had been a stanch republican in politics and was very active in supporting the party in his state. He married Lydia Rhodes, a native of Merrimac, Kentucky, whose people had also settled in the state in pioneer times, coming from Pennsylvania and Virginia, the Rhodes family being of English descent. Mrs. Hogan is still living, making her home at Merrimac, where she reared her family of three sons and a daughter, all yet living. Judge Hogan was the second in...

Biography of W. R. Jones

The subject of this sketch was born in Wayne County, Illinois, December 1, 1861. His father and mother were born in Illinois; both his grandfathers were born in Kentucky, and his great-grand-father, Cadwaledar Jones, was born in South Carolina. His ancestors took a prominent part in the Revolutionary War, one of them, Robert Anderson, being a chieftain along with Marion and Sumter. The Jones family originally came from Wales. The Anderson family, into which the grandfather of the subject of this sketch married, came from Ireland. The Staten family, into which the father of the subject of this sketch married, were of Scotch-Irish descent. The Statens settled in Kentucky, it is thought near Crab Orchard, in an early day, and the great-grandmother of the subject of this sketch was murdered by the Indians while at a spring doing some washing. The savages cut her all to pieces and hung the remains in a black jack bush. The grandfather of the subject of this sketch, Cadwaledar Jones, left Kentucky and went into Indiana in the year 1808, and settled in what is now Gibson County. He was in the Indian War that came up in 181I , and fired the first shot at the battle of Tippecanoe, he being one of the night sentinels. In 1816 he removed to what is now Wayne County, Illinois, and built the first cabin ever erected in that county. Here, the same year, John Jones, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born, he being the first white child born in that county. In 1835 John Jones left Illinois and emigrated with...

Biography of William J. Stewart, M. D.

William J. Stewart, M. D. His first years in. Kansas Doctor Stewart spent in the role of a practical farmer, but since finishing his medical course had been in successful practice as a physician and surgeon at Summerfield, Marshall County. Doctor Stewart is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. His grandfather, William Stewart, was born at Strabane, Ireland, in 1808, and married Nancy Wilson, a native of the same place, born in 1806. Both of them were of Scotch-Irish families. They married in the old country and all their children were born in Ireland as follows: Charles, who became a farmer and died in Colorado; Belle, who lives at Laroy, Indiana, widow of James McKnight, a Union soldier and a farmer; Jennie, wife of James Carson, now postmaster at Hebron, Indians; and John Stewart. William Stewart and wife brought their family to America and became pioner settlers in Lake County in the extreme northwest corner of Indiana in 1845. William Stewart followed farming and developed a tract of land in that wild section of country and he died at Crown Point, Indiana, in 1883 and his widow survived him and died in that city in 1902. John Stewart, father of Doctor Stewart, was born in Strabane, Ireland, in 1843, and was two years of age when his parents settled near Crown Point, Indiana. He grew up on the old homestead, and at the age of nineteen, in 1862, enlisted for service in the Union army in the Ninth Indiana Infantry. He saw a great deal of active and strennous service in the Army of the Cumberland. He was at the battles of...

Biography of Edward P. Ray

Edward P. Ray. Fortunate is the man who finds his work in the world early in life and concentrates all his energies upon discharging his duties and responsibilities with credit and efficiency. One of this fortunate class was Edward P. Ray of Arkansas City. His father and grandfather before him were in the produce business, established one of the early concerns of that kind in Southern Michigan, and the old house is still flourishing and doing a large business at Coldwater, Michigan, today. Edward P. Ray grew up in that business atmosphere and after breaking home ties and family associations he readily found places of responsibility with other concerns. In the course of his career he came out to Kansas, and for a number of years was manager of the A. S. Kininmonth Company, a produce concern whose activities are practically state wide in Kansas. Mr. Ray was born at Coldwater, Michigan, December 1, 1875, and came of old American Colonial stock. His paternal ancestors settled in New York in the early days. His grandfather, Henry Ray, was born at Oaks Corners in Ontario County, New York, in 1823. For a number of years he was a grocer at Phelps, New York, and organized the produce business which his son, E. F. Ray, still conducts. Henry Ray died at Coldwater, Michigan, in 1885. He came to voting age when the whigs were still a powerful organization, and from that party affiliation he gravitated into the ranks of the republicans. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and at one time served as a member of the New...

Biography of George H. Stewart

Probably every state in the Union has contributed to the quota of prominent men in Idaho. Among the number furnished by Indiana is Judge George Harlan Stewart, who is now presiding over the third judicial district of the state. He was born in Connersville, Indiana, on the 26th of February 1858, and is of Scotch and English lineage, his ancestors having located in Pennsylvania at a pioneer epoch in the history of the Keystone state. Representatives of the family were also early settlers of Ohio, where, in 1821, occurred the birth of Mathew Stewart, father of the Judge. Having arrived at the years of maturity he married Miss Nancy Harlan, whose father was a Baptist minister and an early settler of the state of Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart took up their residence near Connersville, Indiana, where he industriously carried on farming. He was an ardent Republican, a lover of civil liberty and a hater of every form of oppression. He died in 1887, at the age of sixty-six years, and his wife departed this life in the fifty-eighth year of her age. They were the parents of eight children, of whom four are living. Judge Stewart is the second eldest survivor of the family. In the common schools he acquired a sufficient education to enable him to engage in teaching, and in that way he won the means which enabled him to continue his studies in higher institutions of learning. He attended the Northern Indiana Normal school, located at Valparaiso, Indiana, where he graduated in 1879, on the completion of the scientific course, after which he took up...

Biography of Hon. De Forest H. Andrews

It is the enterprise and character of the citizens that enrich and ennoble the commonwealth. From individual enterprise have sprung all the splendor and importance of this great west. The greatest businessmen have developed from the humblest origins, and from clerkships have emerged men who have built up great business enterprises. Among those who have achieved prominence as men of marked ability and substantial worth in Boise is the subject of this sketch. De Forest H. Andrews, one of the most successful real-estate dealers of Idaho. A native of Auburn, New York, he was born on the 23d of May, 1841, and is a representative of one of the old families of that state. His grandfather, Salmon Andrews, was a resident of Syracuse, New York. His father, Salmon S. Andrews, was born in the Empire state, and there married Miss Sarah Stolp, a lady of German descent. In 1843 they removed to Aurora, Illinois, where for a time Mr. Andrews was engaged in farming. Later he removed to Valparaiso, Indiana, where he died at the age of seventy years. Mrs. Andrews then made her home with her son in Leadville, Colorado, where she died in the sixty-eighth year of her age. This worthy couple were the parents of eleven children, but only three are now living. De Forest H. Andrews acquired his education in the public schools of Indiana and Illinois. Throughout his business career his energies have been devoted principally to stock-raising, to mining and to real-estate dealing. In 1860 he emigrated to Colorado, where he engaged in mining at Leadville and Aspen, and in Gilpin and Boulder...

Biography of John C. Brady

The profession of teaching is one which develops a man symmetrically, affords him opportunity for study and thought and fits him for the higher duties of citizenship in a manner thoroughly logical and rational. The successful teacher is a lover of popular enlightenment, and to be that he must be himself enlightened and patriotic. When teachers come to public office they bring to the service of the public a broadminded grasp of affairs and a capacity for work which make them useful, influential and respected. John C. Brady was born in Cedar county, Iowa, May 19, 1863, a son of Hugh and Mary (McClintock) Brady, who are living in Keokuk county, Iowa, respected by all who know them, and prosperous in temporal affairs. Mr. Brady attended the public schools near his home and was graduated from the Northern Indiana Normal School, at Valparaiso, in 1884. From that time until in 1898 he was teaching school almost continuously, in Iowa, Montana and Idaho. He came to Rathdrum, Kootenai county, Idaho, in 1894, was for four years principal of the schools of that town and came to be known as one of the most devoted and successful educators in the state. In November 1898, he was, as a Democrat, elected to the office of judge of probate of Kootenai County, an office, which he is administering with much ability and good judgment and with the approbation of the general public, without regard to political alliances. He was called to the position by a majority large enough to attest great personal popularity, for he is exceptionally progressive and public-spirited and has a...

Biography of William E. Schermerhorn

William E. Schermerhorn is a merchant at Wilson and for a man of thirty-five carrics some very heavy responsibilities. He is a native of Kansas and son of a pioneer whose career recalls some interesting events and developments in the far West. His father, E. D. Schermerhorn, is still living at Wilson, nearly seventy years of age. E. D. Schermerhorn was born near Troy, New York, in 1848. His ancestors were the Schermerhorn family of Holland established on Manhattan Island by three brothers in the time of Peter Stuyvesant. The name Schermerhorn is still found in local nomenclature in and around New York. When E. D. Schermerhorn was fifteen years of age he ran away from home and for many years lived close to the frontier of American enterprise and settlement. His first location was at White Pigeon in Southern Michigan, at that time a place of considerable importance. There he worked in a store and blacksmith shop, but in 1866 he came still further west and located at old Fort Ellsworth, now Kanopolis, Kansas. Here he found employment in the sutler’s store for Judge Osborne, and was soon given active management of the store. In 1869 he went with Colonel Foreytho as a blacksmith for the Government and assisted in establishing Fort Sill in the Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. At old Fort Sill he had charge of all the blacksmithing work until he returned to Fort Harker, Kansas. The winters of 1870 and 1871 he spent hunting buffalo on the plains. He never killed a buffalo for its hide, though this businese was afterwards developed to large proportions....
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