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Biography of Hon. Chester Pike

Hon. Chester Pike, a prominent citizen of Sullivan County, New Hampshire, residing in Cornish, his native town, was born July 30, 1829, son of Ebenezer and Judith (Bryant) Pike. On both his father’s and his mother’s side he is descended from distinguished ancestry, and from families that have been conspicuous, not only in the history of New Hampshire, but in the history of the nation. His grandfather Pike was born in Newbury, Mass., and came to Cornish in early manhood, the first of the name to settle here. He bought a farm and a mill on Blow-me-down Brook, and devoted himself to farming and to carrying on the mill. He married Mary Marcy, of Hartland, Vt.; and they had three children-Ebenezer, Chester (first), and Pliny. Chester, first, who never married, died in Northumberland when about thirty-five years of age. Pliny Pike was a farmer of Cornish, and died in that town at the age of seventy years. Ebenezer, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Cornish in 1788, and died in 1862. After completing his studies at school, he purchased and carried on one of the largest stock-raising farms in the county, raising thoroughbred horses for the Boston market. With the exception of Mr. Wainwright, of Vermont, no one else of his time Mr. Ebenezer Pike was always alert to make a good bargain. He traded horses then as well as jack-knives and other boyish knickknacks, and this natural business ability was the foundation of his success in life. In politics he was a Whig, but was not ambitious for political honors, and did not meddle...

Mann, Socrates C. (Crate) – Obituary

“Crate” Mann Takes Own Life At Baker Home Socrates C. (Crate) Mann, committed suicide, by hanging, at his home, 1600 Sixth street, Baker, sometime during the afternoon Saturday of last week. The body was found hanging in the garage at six o’clock by Mrs. Mann who went in search of her husband when he failed to return to the house at that time in the evening. Report of the tragedy came as a shock to North Powder people who had known the deceased for years. “Crate” Mann had been a resident of this section for fifty years, coming to this country from his former home at Plainfield, Vermont, at the age of 21. Without finances or other resources other than Yankee thrift and determination, in the fifty years, he accumulated property, mortgages and bonds valued at $200,000. He began life in eastern Oregon as a sheep herder. At the time of his death, he owned some of the best farms in this district and was regarded as one of the wealthiest men in the Powder River valley. Mr. Mann was born in Plainfield, Vermont, December 13, 1856 and came to Oregon in 1877. He worked for ranchers and stock men for a number of years. For several years, with his family, he made his home on his Wolf Creek ranch, now occupied by Leo Mann. Since 1909 he has made his home the greater part of the time in Baker. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL...

Biographical Sketch of Benjamin F. Morse

Benjamin F. Morse was born in Barre, Vt., in 1828, and came to Elmore from Plainfield, Vt., in 1852, and located upon the farm he now occupies, on road 28. His house, erected in 1853, was the second frame house built in the eastern part of the town. Mr. Morse has been married three times, and is one of the prominent men of the...

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