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Biography of James H. Hawley

No Compendium such as the province of this work defines in its essential limitations will serve to offer fit memorial to the life and accomplishments of the honored subject of this sketch a man remarkable in the breadth of his wisdom, in his indomitable perseverance, his strong individuality, and yet one whose entire life has not one esoteric phase, being an open scroll, inviting the closest scrutiny. True, his have been “massive deeds and great” in one sense, and yet his entire life accomplishment but represents the result of the fit utilization of the innate talent which is his, and the directing of his efforts in those lines where mature judgment and rare discrimination lead the way. There is in Mr. Hawley a weight of character, a native sagacity, a far-seeing judgment and a fidelity of purpose that commands the respect of all. A man of indefatigable enterprise and fertility of resource, he has carved his name deeply on the record of the political, commercial and professional history of the state, which owes much of its advancement to his efforts. James H. Hawley was born in Dubuque, Iowa, on the 17th of January 1847, and in his veins mingles the blood of English, Dutch and Irish ancestors. The Hawley family was founded in America in 1760. William Carr, the maternal great-grandfather of our subject, was a major in the Revolutionary army; and the grandfather, Henry Carr, commanded a company in the war of 1812, with the rank of captain. Thomas Hawley, his father, was born in Brooklyn, New York, and became a civil engineer by profession. He married Miss...

Biography of Milton Kelly

Judge Milton Kelly, now deceased, who attained considerable prominence as one of Idaho’s most loyal citizens and public-spirited men, was born in Onondaga County, New York, September 9, 1818, and descended from Irish ancestors who were early settlers in New England. He was reared on his father’s farm, obtaining his early education in Bloomfield, New York, and when still young taught school. He went to Ohio, subsequently removing to Wisconsin, where for some time he was engaged in the mercantile business, and then studied law and was admitted to the bar about 1845. He then took up the practice of his profession, for which he was peculiarly fitted by his natural abilities, and during his thirteen years of active professional life in Wisconsin he became intimately acquainted with the leading men and was prominently identified with shaping the destiny of the then new state. In 1861 Judge Kelly went to California and the following year removed to the new mining town of Auburn, Oregon, where he engaged in the express and transportation business, between that town and Placerville, Boise County, Idaho, later making his home in Placerville. In the autumn of 1863, following the act of organization of the territory of Idaho, he was, at an election held in Boise County, elected a member of the first session of the Idaho territorial legislature, which was held in Lewiston, Nez Perces County, then the capital. In framing the laws of government for the new territory Judge Kelly’s knowledge and wide experience made his services of the greatest value, the result being the adoption of general laws and the passage of...

Biography of Calvin R. White

Calvin R. White, one of the best known pioneers of Idaho, now residing in Boise, was born near Boston, Massachusetts, July 27, 1836, his parents being Samuel B. and Sarah (Richardson) White, natives of the Bay state. The father was for many years connected with the Boston & Lowell Railway, and died in the city of Boston when about seventy-six years of age. He was a son of Samuel White, also a native of Massachusetts, in which state his death occurred when he had passed the psalmist’s span of life of three-score years and ten. The mother of our subject died in Winchester, Massachusetts, in 1880, when about seventy-four years of age. In the public schools of South Woburn, Winchester and Boston Calvin R. White acquired his early education, which was supplemented by a course in the Warren Academy, at Woburn, Massachusetts. At the age of thirteen he went to sea, and spent fourteen years before the mast, being in command of a vessel during one-half of that period. He made seven trips to Calcutta and visited many other foreign ports, thus gaining a broad knowledge of the various countries and their peoples. On quitting the sea he located at San Francisco, where he spent the winter of 1862-3 and then came across the country to the territory of Idaho. For four years he resided in Centerville and in Placerville, and then removed to Garden Valley, where he remained about seven years. At the first two places he was engaged in placer mining and at the last named place carried on agricultural pursuits. Subsequently he removed to Jerusalem, four...

Biography of John Krall

Few lives have been more active or more thoroughly filled with incidents of interest and of unusual nature than has that of John Krall, one of the pioneers of Idaho, and for about thirty-five years a resident in the vicinity of Boise City. Now a wealthy man, he is indebted to himself alone for his fortune, for he started out in youth to fight the battle of life, a poor boy, and by the exercise of industry and perseverance, in the face of great difficulties, he came off victor over all. Mr. Krall is a native of Germany, born December 10, 1835, his parents and ancestors likewise being of German birth. His father owned a flouring mill and the lad early learned the business. When he had mastered the branches of learning taught in the government schools he went to England, and there, at sixteen, took up the study of the English language and customs, while he worked as a baker and confectioner. Desiring to see something of the world, and well equipped to earn a living, as he was familiar with two languages and had mastered two trades, he shipped aboard a vessel and in the next few years sailed to various parts of the world. Once, when sailing around Cape Horn, he was shipwrecked, and the disabled vessel was towed to Valparaiso by an English man-of-war. From that city Mr. Krall went to Honolulu, and thence to San Francisco, where he remained until 1856. He then went to Oregon and Washington, and rented a mill at Dallas, Oregon, and also carried on business near Salem until 1859....

Biography of John Dovell

JOHN DOVELL. – Mr. Dovell is one of those men who have belabored fortune, and have knocked about the world until it is sufficient to turn one’s hair gray simply to listen to their adventures. A native of the Azores, of Portuguese parentage and born in 1836, he came to Portland, Maine, at the age of fourteen, and learned shipbuilding. He left in four years and plied his trade in New Orleans, shipping thence to Liverpool, and coming as ship’s carpenter from that foreign port to San Francisco. He soon came up the coast to Portland, Oregon, and worked upon the steam ferry Independence, building near the “South End Sawmill” by Powell, Coffin, “Preacher” Kelly, and Hankins, the captain, to run opposition to Stevens’ ferry. Starting for the Frazer river mines in 1859, he met a number of friends at Victoria, and, together with seventeen of them, put across the Georgian Gulf in rowboats, making a dangerous passage. They then followed up the river by the Skilloot route to Horse Beef bar, the company then separating and going to prospecting. Dovell made no strike. Some twenty of the company on the way back went down to the Littoot Lake, and in the absence of a boat to go down to Langley were compelled to take one by force from one Robertson, for which high-handed act they were arrested upon their arrival at Victoria three days after, and compelled to pay Robertson eighty-seven dollars. The judge gave Dovell ten dollars for his part taken in the matter. Returning to Portland, he worked in Jacob’s wagon shop, and in the spring...

Biographical Sketch of James B. Crossen

JAMES B. CROSSEN. – Mr. Crossen is the present postmaster at The Dalles, and was born August 11, 1838, at Donegal, Ireland. This was his residence until he emigrated to America in 1849 and made his home with his parents in New York City until of age. In 1859 he crossed the Isthmus to California, and resided at Callaghan’s Ranch for four years, going from thence to Idaho, where he engaged in business at Placerville until 1863. Seeking a new location, he cast his eyes with hope towards the State of Oregon, and selected The Dalles as the most eligible point for business and residence, and has remained there until the present time. Mr. Crossen has ever occupied responsible positions in public life. He was elected sheriff of Wasco county in 1876, and was re-elected in 1878 and in 1884, thus serving three full terms. He was also elected twice to the city council of The Dalles. In the interim he followed merchandising and auctioneering until, in 1886, he was appointed postmaster, a position which he now fills. In 1863 he married Miss Frances H.C. Gray of Portland, Maine, who bore him three children, two of whom are now living, – grace e., born in 1867, and James a., born in 1864. His wife Frances dying in 1870, he was married secondly in 1872 to Laura Alice Martin, his present wife, and the mother of his two youngest children, G.W. and Emily A. Mr. Crossen has been continuously and is now actively engaged in business pursuits, and is closely identified with the interests of The Dalles and of Wasco...

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