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Biography of James Frederick McFadden, M. D.

Dr. James Frederick McFadden, who in keeping with the tendency of the age toward specialization has become a successful neurologist, was born in Belmont, Missouri, September 22, 1888. His father, James McFadden, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was an enterprising merchant of Belmont until a few years prior to his death, when he removed to St. Louis and retired from active business, passing away in 1907, at the age of fifty-three years. His wife, who in her maidenhood was Josephine L. Klinge, was born in Wabasha, Minnesota, and came to St. Louis with her parents when very young and is now a resident of Charleston, Missouri. By her marriage she became the mother of four children, two sons and two daughters, all of whom are living. Dr. McFadden, the second child, was educated in the country schools at Belmont, Missouri, to the age of eight years and afterwards in the graded schools of St. Louis and St. Louis University. In preparation for his professional career he attended the St. Louis University Medical School and won his M. D. degree in 1913. Prior to his graduation he served as interne in the Alexian Brothers Hospital, where he remained until September, 1913, when he became resident neurologist of the Alexian Brothers Hospital and acted in that capacity until July, 1914. At that date he removed to Boston, Massachusetts, where he became a member of the staff of the Boston Psychopathic Hospital, being the first Missourian to fill a similar position in that institution. There he continued until March, 1915, and was afterward at the Massachusetts State Hospital at Foxboro, where...

Biography of Calvin Perry Bascom

Calvin Perry Bascom, general manager for the business conducted under the name of the Fayette R. Plumb Company, Incorporated, of St. Louis, was born in Ellsworth, Kansas, October 17, 1876. His father, Daniel Craig Bascom, a native of the state of New York, removed to Kansas in 1868 and there engaged in ranching for a number of years, contributing to the early development and progress of that district. He afterward returned to the Empire state, taking up his abode in Rochester, and has now passed away. In early manhood he wedded Agnes Johnson, a native of Vermont, their marriage, however, being celebrated in Ellsworth, Kansas, in 1873. Mrs. Bascom is still living and now makes her home in Rochester, New York. Their family numbers two sons and two daughters. The second eldest of the family is Calvin Perry Bascom, who was educated in the public and high schools of Rochester and also attended the Rochester University and the New York Trade School. He then started with his father in the heating and plumbing business in which he continued for four years, but desirous of improving his education and still further to qualify for the practical and responsible duties of business life he went to Boston where he entered the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was there graduated in 1904 with the degree of Bachelor of Science. He next accepted a position with the Fayette R. Plumb Company, Incorporated, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in October, 1904. He had charge of manufacturing there for six years and on the expiration of that period came to St. Louis in 1910. Here he designed...

Biography of William M. Bryan, M. D.

The medical profession in St. Louis has many distinguished and capable representatives, men who are most conscientious and faithful in the discharge of all professional duties and who are continually striving to promote knowledge and efficiency by broad reading and comprehensive study. To this class belongs Dr. Bryan who was born in St. Louis November 25, 1875. His father, W. J. S. Bryan, also a native of St. Louis is a son of William and Martha Alice (How) Bryan. W.J.S. Bryan is now connected with the board of education of this city. His father, William Bryan, served as vice president of the board of education and later became its supply agent, which office he held until a few years before his death at the age of eighty-three years. W.J.S. Bryan married Nettie Case, who was American born but of English descent, their wedding being celebrated in St. Louis in 1874 and in 1887 Mrs. Bryan passed to the home beyond. In their family were six children, two sons and four daughters, and of these a brother and sister of Dr. Bryan of this review are still living: Grace, the wife of Rev. Frank B. James of Kingston, Illinois; and Howard, who is with the valuation department of the Frisco Railroad and lives in Webster, Missouri. The eldest of the family is Dr. Bryan of this review, who was educated in the public schools of St. Louis until he had completed a course in the Central high school as a graduate of 1893. He next entered the Washington University and there won his Bachelor of Arts degree upon graduation with...

Biography of Andrew H. Reeder, Governor

Pennsylvania had long been noted for her distingnished men in all walks of life. This is particalarly true of the Pennsylvania bar, and the current and popular phrase “a Philadelphia lawyer,” denoting unusual ability and intellectual acumen, illustrates the fact that it was thoroughly recognized both in and out of Pennsylvania that the lawyers of this commonwealth were worthy of the pre-eminence claimed for them. The bar of Northampton County shared this preeminence, and for more than a century it had maintained its prestige in the front rank of the profession in the commonwealth. Its roll contains the names of many distinguished and able lawyers who have also been in high official station. It is not my province in this paper to catalogue them but it will suffice to mention Samuel Sitgreaves, Judge Hopewell Hepburn, Judge Joel Jones, George Wolf, governor of Pennsylvania, James M. Porter, twice president judge and secretary of war in President Tyler’s cabinet; Richard Brodhead, a member of Congress and senator of the United States; Peter Ihrie, Henry D. Maxwell, Sr., Henry Green, chief justice of Pennsylvania, Judge Kirkpatrick, attorney general of Pennsylvania; Howard J. Reeder, judge of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania and General Frank Reeder, secretary of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The subject of this paper, Hon. Andrew Horatio Reeder, was one of the most distinguished and ablest lawyers of our bar. His fame was not confined to the county or to the state but was nation-wide, and in the stirring period just prior to the outbreak of the Civil war he played a large and important part. Governor Reeder belonged to a...

Biography of Henry W. Hermann, M.D

Dr. Henry W. Hermann, who has attained prominence in the field of neurology, was born on the 9th of June, 1855, at Hermansburg, Washington county, Arkansas, and is a son of Charles F. and Lena D. (Wilhelmi) Hermann. According to a genealogical record printed by C. F. Hermann, the first date mentioned in connection with the family in America is 1650. In a volume entitled Founders of Harman’s Station, Kentucky, it appears that one Heinrich Hermann from the same family reached America about the year 1700, penetrated as far west as the Mississippi river, and was celebrated as an Indian fighter. During the Revolutionary war his sons fought the British who had incited the Indians to make war upon the early settlers. The Wilhelmi genealogy dates back to 1525, naming a minister, the builder of a beautiful pulpit at Elprincen, Westphalia. The eldest son in this family has been a minister for nine generations and the father of Lena D. Wilhelmi also devoted his life to that holy calling. Charles F. Hermann left his home at Mannheim, Germany, in 1848 after the failure of the revolution when liberty loving men sought to establish a republic. Unsuccessful in this attempt he resolved to emigrate to America and enjoy the advantages, opportunities and liberties of the new world. Crossing the Atlantic he and his brother John founded the town of Hermansburg, Arkansas, which was destroyed during the Rebellion. They afterward settled in St. Louis, establishing the firm of C. F. Hermann & Company in 1865. Charles F. Hermann wedded Lena D. Wilhelmi, whose ancestors had also been participants in the struggle...

Biography of Thomas Newman

In the veins of this gentleman flowed sturdy English blood, for in Dorchester, England, he first saw the light of day. In his boyhood he was brought to this country by his father, John Newman, and with him settled in Philadelphia, Pa., where the latter followed the calling of a mechanic, and eventually died. Thomas Newman attained manhood in the East and then embarked in the battle of life as a railroad engineer, but in 1858 or’59 turned his attention to newspaper work in Kansas, and through its pages advocated the cause of Abolition. After a short time he moved to St. Louis, Missouri, where he became a job printer, but during the war he joined the Missouri State Militia, and was in active service in the State. He was lieutenant of his company and was in a number of the engagements of the Price raid. In 1869 he came to Boone County, Arkansas, and established the first paper in this part of the country, which tool the name of the Boone County Advocate, and which was published with success up to 1876, when The Times took its place. Although he was a strong Abolitionist and Union man, he was a man of Democratic principles and became the first mayor of Harrison. He was a man of jovial and generous disposition, was finely educated, his friends were legion and he was active and pushing in everything to which he gave his attention. He was the first vice-president of the Arkansas State Newspaper Association, and in his branch of human endeavor he did much to mold public thought and to...

Biography of Dr. N. C. Berry

DR. N. C. BERRY. Our subject, a prominent and leading physician of West Plains, Missouri, was born April 5, 1838, in Union County, Kentucky, of which State his father, Dr. J. T. Berry, was also a native. The elder Berry was born in Fayette County in 1810, and was the son of John Berry, who was a native Virginian and an early settler of Kentucky. Dr. J. T. Berry took up the practice of medicine nearly sixty years ago in Kentucky, and came to Missouri in 1869. He located in Camden County, but subsequently moved to Carthage, where he is now practicing. He is about eighty-four years of age, a prominent physician, and member of the board of pension examiners at Carthage. He was married in Kentucky to Miss Susan M. Hodge, daughter of James Hodge, formerly of Kentuky, now deceased. She is still living, and is seventy years of age. Of their seven children our subject is eldest in order of birth. The others are as follows: C. L. and H. A., residents of Carthage; John J., deceased, was a soldier in the Fourth Kentucky Infantry, Confederate Army; C. C., who died when a child, and two daughters who died young. Our subject passed his boyhood and youth in his native county, attended the schools there and the high school in his native town, and early in life began the study of medicine with his father and an uncle, Dr. J. W. Berry. Later he entered the Jefferson College, of Philadelphia, Pa., and there finished his education. Following this the Doctor enlisted in the Confederate Army, Fourth Kentucky...

Slave Narrative of Georgia Baker

Interviewer: Mrs. Sadie Hornsby Person Interviewed: Georgia Baker Location: Athens, Georgia Georgia’s address proved to be the home of her daughter, Ida Baker. The clean-swept walks of the small yard were brightened by borders of gay colored zinnias and marigolds in front of the drab looking two-story, frame house. “Come in,” answered Ida, in response to a knock at the front door. “Yessum, Mammy’s here. Go right in dat dere room and you’ll find her.” Standing by the fireplace of the next room was a thin, very black woman engaged in lighting her pipe. A green checked gingham apron partially covered her faded blue frock over which she wore a black shirtwaist fastened together with “safety first” pins. A white cloth, tied turban fashion about her head, and gray cotton hose worn with black and white slippers that were run down at the heels, completed her costume. “Good mornin’. Yessum, dis here’s Georgia,” was her greeting. “Let’s go in dar whar Ida is so us can set down. I don’t know what you come for, but I guess I’ll soon find out.” Georgia was eager to talk but her articulation had been impaired by a paralytic stroke and at times it was difficult to understand her jumble of words. After observance of the amenities; comments on the weather, health and such subjects, she began: “Whar was I born? Why I was born on de plantation of a great man. It was Marse Alec Stephens’ plantation ’bout a mile and a half from Crawfordville, in Taliaferro County. Mary and Grandison Tilly was my Ma and Pa. Ma was cook up...

Biography of James B. Russell

James B. Russell. During his long and active career in Champaign James B. Russell made his impress on the financial life of the city and was a business man implicitly trusted, and the success he won in material affairs was only a part of the splendid record of his entire life as a man and citizen. Mr. Russell was born in the city of Philadelphia in October, 1837. At the close of a long and active career he passed away at his home in Champaign, November 4, 1914, aged seventy-seven. His parents were Jonathan and Sarah (Burt) Russell, the former a native of Philadelphia and the latter of New Jersey. The late Mr. Russell was educated in the grammar schools of Philadelphia until he was sixteen years of age and then for a time attended an academy in New Jersey. When about twenty-one years of age he married and soon afterward he and his young wife came West to Champaign County. He bought land at Tolono and was getting well started and had considerable business interests when the war broke out. Early in the war Mr. Russell went back to visit friends and relatives in New Jersey. While there he witnessed many of his boyhood friends joining the army, and he. too, caught the infection and, placing patriotism above all business and personal considerations, he enlisted in Company D of the Twenty-fifth New Jersey Infantry. Mrs. Russell in the meantime had remained in Champaign County. With the assistance of her neighbors Mrs. Russell sold off much of the farm stock and implements and returned to Philadelphia and New Jersey,...

Biography of George G. Irle

George G. Irle. In the famous farming district of Champaign County, where the possession of land spells prosperity, one of the active factors today is Mr. George G. Irle, whose well managed place is in section 16 of Somer Township. Mr. Irle began farming here over fifty-five years ago, and has been through practically every phase of experience as an Illinois farmer. He has had low prices and high prices for his crops, and through seasons both good and bad he has contrived to prosper and to grow in influence and affluence. Mr. Irle has lived in Champaign County since childhood, but was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 31, 1852. His parents were Henry W. and Christina (Hohn) Irle. Both parents were born in Germany, the mother in Nassau. Henry W. Irle came to America in 1848, locating at Philadelphia, where he followed the trade of brass founder. In 1862 he brought his family west to Champaign County, and changing his occupation located on a farm in Somer Township. He became one of the substantial men of that district, and lived a long and useful career. His death occurred July 27, 1901. His wife passed away August 16, 1884. Their five children were: Hulda, deceased; Francesca, who died in infancy; George G.; Henry H., deceased; and Francesca, wife of Thomas B. Thornburn, of Urbana, Illinois. George G. Irle was ten years of age when his parents came to Champaign County. In 1859, when a boy of seven, he had an exciting experience and barely escaped becoming victim of a famous kidnapping case in Philadelphia. It all happened on Christmas...
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