Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Jasper N. Ray

JASPER N. RAY. Jasper N. Ray belongs to that class of American citizens who are enterprising, thoroughgoing and industrious, and who rise in a few years from a condition of dependence to one of prominence and the possession of considerable wealth. In fact, he is a self-made man in all which that much-abused term implies, and the property he has accumulated is the result of his own honest industry. He first saw the light of day in what is now Maries County, Missouri, his birth occurring in 1846, to the union of Hubbard and Vashti (Moon) Ray, the father, a native of Grainger County, Tennessee born in 1820, and the mother born near Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1826. Then young Mr. and Mrs. Ray went with their parents to what is now Phelps County, Missouri, where they grew to mature years and were married. Afterward they came to what is Maries County, Missouri, but, a few years later, moved to Greene County, where they resided for about five years. Their next move was to Barry County, where they were among the pioneers; but they only remained there about three years and returned to what is now Phelps County. From 1861 to 1865 the family resided in Arkansas, and then returned to Phelps County, where Mr. Ray died in 1867. He was a successful farmer, and was upright and honorable during his long career. The following incident is one instance of his honesty when a young man: Soon after he and his parents started for Missouri, and before they reached Nashville, while Mr. Ray, father of subject, who was then a...

Biography of Hon. George Washington Shedd

HON. GEORGE WASHINGTON SHEDD. He whose name heads this sketch has been successful in the various occupations to which his attention has been directed throughout life, and at the present time he is not only successfully engaged in tilling the soil and raising stock, but he also practices law, in which profession he has attained prominence. He was born in the county in which he now lives April 17, 1847, a son of William C. and Mary A. (Sinclair) Shedd, who were born in Reading, Vt., in 1800 and Washington County, Missouri, respectively. The father spent the early part of his life in a store in his native town, but until he was seventeen years of age he was an attendant of the best schools of his native State. He left home at the age of sixteen years, and soon after finishing his education he spent a few years in New York, then came to Missouri and was married in Washington County. He soon after located in Shannon County, and began selling goods at Blue Springs, but a few years later opened a store at the mouth of Jack’s Fork, later four miles below Blue Springs and then in Spring Valley. He also improved a good farm at this place, but when the war came up, he dropped all former occupations in 1862, went to Rolla and was in the provost marshal’s office a short time. He died in Phelps County in 1863, and his death was much regretted, for he was a useful public-spirited citizen and an accommodating and cordial friend and neighbor. He was quite an active...

Biography of Thomas F. Williams

THOMAS F. WILLIAMS. T. F. Williams is a substantial citizen of Taney County, Missouri, and from early boyhood has devoted his attention to farming interests, being now the owner of an excellent tract of 280 acres, 100 acres under cultivation, in Swan township. Mr. Williams was born in Polk County, Missouri, December 6, 1859, and is a son of John E. and Louisa J. (Hale) Williams, both natives of Tennessee, the former born October 21, 1820, and the latter September 27, 1830. The grandfather, John Williams, died in Tennessee. About 1852 the father of our subject came to Missouri and settled in Polk County, where he resided until 1867, when he came to Taney County, settling on a farm at the mouth of Beaver Creek, on White River, where his death occurred in 1882. All his life was devoted to farming and stockraising, but he was public-spirited and held the office of justice of the peace for a number of years. In political matters he was a supporter of Republican principles, and during the war, he was enrolled in the State militia, but was exempt from duty on account of holding the office of justice of the peace. His wife died in 1885. She was the daughter of Samuel Hale, a native of Tennessee, who came to Polk County, Missouri, where he died about 1890. He was a farmer and a prominent man in that county. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Williams, as follows: S. J., a farmer of this county, and collector of revenue for Taney County from 1888 to 1892; Sarah M., wife of...

Biography of Hon. Richard P. Bland

HON. RICHARD P. BLAND. From poverty and obscurity all the eminent men of the West have fought their way in the battle of life, and by their own persistence and perseverance have attained to prominence and honor. They have given permanency to every enterprise that they have honored with their patronage and have stamped upon them their own individuality. The subject of this sketch is a man well known to the people of Missouri, and needs no eulogy from the pen of the biographer, for his deeds are his monuments and will endure long after he has moldered into dust. He was born near Hartford, Ohio County, Kentucky, August 19, 1836. His parents Stouton E. and Margaret (Nall) Bland, both of whom were born on Blue Grass soil. The family originally came from Virginia, but emigrated to Kentucky in the time of Daniel Boone, and were among the early settlers of that country. The father devoted his life to the occupation of farming, and at the age of thirty-five, when just in the prime of life, was called upon to pay the last debt of nature, his widow surviving him several years. Of the four children born to them three are now living: Richard P.; Charles C., who is judge of the Eighteenth Judicial Circuit of Missouri, and Elizabeth, wife of Frederick Tutley, of St. Francois County, Missouri. Young Richard P. received his initiatory training in the public schools in the vicinity of his rural home, and afterward finished his education in Griffin’s Academy. In 1855 he left the home of his childhood and took up his residence in...

Biography of William A. Maples

WILLIAM A. MAPLES. Mr. Maples, though just in the prime of life, has made his way to the front ranks among the energetic farmers of this county, and owing to the attention he has always paid to each minor detail, he has accumulated a fair share of this world’s goods. He is a native of Tennessee, born in Bradley County in 1842, and is a son of Thomas and Rhoda (Maples) Maples, natives of East Tennessee, where they made their home until about 1855. This worthy couple then made their way to Christian County, Missouri, and located on a claim on Terrell Creek. On this they remained for many years, improving and adding to the place, but a few years ago Mr. Maples moved to near Highlandville, where he now resides. Although eighty years of age, time has dealt leniently with him and he is unusually bright and active for his years. For some time Mr. Maples was a teacher, but in connection also carried on farming and continued that until recently. Now he is retired. For a number of years he was justice of the peace of Polk Township. During the early part of the war he was in the Home Guards, and although once captured, he was soon released. For many years he has been an exemplary member of the Missionary Baptist Church. His brothers and sisters were: Ephraim. Absalom, Pleasant, Noah, Perry, Hannah and Polly Ann. The sons all came to Christian County. Their father, Josiah Maples, came to Christian County, where he and wife died before the war. He was a farmer and he and...

Biography of Hon. Joshua Chilton

The gentleman whose name we now give was for many years identified with the best interests of Shannon County, Missouri, and although he has now passed from earth’s activities it is but just and satisfactory that his life’s narrative be recounted among those who have done excellent service in subduing the wilderness and bringing it into its present fine condition physically, mentally and morally. Mr. Chilton was born in Wayne County, Tennessee, September 28, 1818, and was a son of Thomas Chilton, who was a native of Maryland. Thomas Chilton was partly reared in his native State and then moved with his parents to east Tennessee and thence to Missouri, while that State was yet a Territory inhabited by Indians. He represented his county in the Legislature when the county formed nearly half the State, and here he died in 1865, when eighty-two years of age. He was in the Black Hawk War. The original of this notice never attended school a day in his life, but he learned to read and write and became a profound student, all by his own exertions. During the latter part of the forties he located on Current River, twelve miles below the present town of Eminence, and entered actively upon his career as a pioneer, clearing and improving his place. The first money he made was rafting cedar to Devall’s Bluff in Arkansas, and he also took lumber of all kinds down the same way. In that way he made his start and as the years passed by he became quite wealthy, although he lost heavily during the war. He represented Shannon...

Biography of Capt. George Fry

CAPT. GEORGE FRY, an old and honored citizen of Shannon County, Missouri, is a native of the Buckeye State, born in Franklin County in 1817. His father, George Fry, was a native of Pennsylvania, who went to Ohio in 1812 or 1813, floating down the Ohio River to the Sciota in flatboats with his family and household effects. He then went up the Sciota where he afterwards located, and there passed the balance of his days, dying when seventy-seven years of age. He was in the Indian War, and was in the battle of Tippecanoe. When he first went to Ohio the Indians were still there; in fact that State had only been admitted into the Union about ten years, and was but sparsely settled. Capt. George Fry, who was one of seven children, spent his school days in Athens County, Ohio, whither his parents had moved, and there reached man-hood. He turned his attention to farming at first, but afterward was superintendent of the iron works at Vinton Station, Vinton County, for fifteen years. Following this he took up railroad contracting on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, and afterward, in 1869, went to West Virginia, and was on the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad. He was also in Kentucky on a railroad south of Lexington, and all the time was building railroad bridges, etc. Later he came West with the intention of taking contract on the Cuba and Salem branch, but arrived too late to get contract and instead became foreman. He helped build the railroad to Steeleville, where he worked for different parties, and then a part of...

Biography of Dr. H. C. Shuttee

DR. H. C. SHUTTEE. One of the old and honored men in medicine by citizens of Howell County, Missouri, was Dr. C. H. E. Shuttee, deceased, who was the father of the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. The elder Shuttee was a native of Hamburg, Germany, and was educated in that country. When a young man he came to the United States and took up his home in the State of Indiana, at Huntington. Later he became a soldier in the Union Army, served during the latter part of the war, and took part in some hard fought battles. Soon after the war he came to this county and located in West Plains, where he practiced his profession up to about 1884. He then went to Central America and took charge of a banana plantation at Bloomfield, Nicaragua. There his death occurred in 1887. He was a prominent physician in this section of the country and was a member of the District Medical Association. He was appointed by President Grant as examining surgeon of pensions in this county and held the position up to the first election of Cleveland. The Doctor was well known in south Missouri and as a physician ranked among the best. He held the office of district United States commissioner at one time. The Doctor was a Master Mason, a member of the commandery and the Knights Templar and was a prominent man in the order. Dr. Shuttee was married in the Hoosier State to Miss Barbara Goodmiller, a native of Germany and the daughter of Andrew Goodmiller, who is still living in Huntington...

Biography of John W. Garrett

JOHN W. GARRETT. Howell County, Missouri, is fortunate in her farmers and stockmen, who are, almost without exception, men of energy, thrift and enterprise, and prominent among these is John W. Garrett, who is a native of Overton County, Tennessee, where he first saw the light in 1845. His parents, Jacob and Mary (Chapin) Garrett, were also born in that county, the former in 1819 and the latter in 1821, and were married in the State of their birth. In 1852 the family came by wagon to what is now Howell County and entered a tract of land, which now composes a portion of the farm owned by John W. Garrett. On this farm the father died October 6, 1856, after a long life spent in tilling the soil, and by hard work gained a comfortable fortune. He was one of fourteen children born to John Garrett, who died in Overton County, Tennessee, in 1840, at the age of forty-five years, although he was a native of North Carolina. He was a German by descent and a farmer by occupation. His wife, whose maiden name was Jane Henshaw, was born in 1799 and died in Overton County, Tennessee John Garrett’s father, who bore the name of Jacob Garrett, removed from North Carolina to Georgia, thence to Overton County, Tennessee, and there he was called from life at the advanced age of ninety years. His wife, Elizabeth Pfeiffer, lived to be over one hundred years of age and breathed her last in Overton County. She was born in Germany and came to the United States with her father when about...
Page 1 of 212

Pin It on Pinterest