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Biography of William I. Robinson

Mr. Raymond practiced his profession at Chippawa until the close of the rebellion in 1838, acting as a soldier during that exciting period, and then moved to St. Catharines, where he continued his practice and his connection with the military, being promoted, step by step, to a Captaincy in the 5th Lincoln, Lieut. Colonel John Clark, commander. From 1845 to 1853 he again resided in Chippawa; and returning to St. Catharines he remained there until the separation of the Counties of Lincoln and Welland in 1856, when he was appointed Clerk of the Peace for Welland, and removed to his present home. Subsequently he was appointed County Attorney, and still holds both offices, continuing, meantime, his legal practice, and doing a good business in the several Courts. He is a careful lawyer, very attentive to his business, prompt and perfectly reliable. Mr. Raymond has often served as a trustee of the Grammar School, and has occasionally acted as chairman of that Board, being ready at all times, we understand, to cooperate with his fellow citizens in promoting the educational interests of this the county town, whose schools have a high reputation. Mr. Raymond is a member of the Church of England; has served as warden a number of years, and has been a delegate to the Synod at sundry times. In October, 1855, Miss Mary Jane Cochrane, of St. Catharines, and whose widowed mother was from Armagh, Ireland, was joined in marriage with Mr. Raymond, and they have four children, three sons and one daughter. Samuel D., the eldest son, is in the Imperial Bank, Toronto; William B. is...

Biography of Hamnett Hill, M.R.C.S

One of the oldest medical practitioners in Ottawa is Hamnett Hill, son of John Wilkes Hill, many years a successful physician in the City of London, England, where the subject of this sketch was born, December 15, 1811. The maiden name of his mother was Mary Elizabeth Pinhey. He received his literary education at Albion House, Camberwell, a suburb of London, in the private school of Nicholas Wanostrocht, L.L.D., celebrated for his epitome of Blackstone’s Commentaries; and his medical education at the London Hospital, Whitechapel, receiving his diploma of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1834. Dr. Hill practiced three or four years at Brighton, County of Sussex; in 1837 left England, crossed the ocean and located in the Township of March, fifteen miles from Ottawa, in the County of Carleton, where he remained three or four years. It was a sparsely settled, healthy district, and the doctor not having faith enough to live on, to avoid starvation, removed in 1841 to Bytown, now Ottawa; here he soon built up a good practice, and has made a comfortable living. He was surgeon to the County of Carleton Protestant Hospital many years, and is now consulting physician to the same, and of the Protestant Orphans’ Home, and of the Roman Catholic General Hospital; has been for a great number of years Magistrate for the County of Carleton, but does no business in that line; he has been President of the St. George’s Society two or three times. Dr. Hill delivered the inaugural address at the Tri-Centennial of the Poet Shakspeare, April 23, 1864, and has long been an occasional contributor...

Biography of Agnew P. Farrell

Agnew P. Farrell, Registrar of deeds and County Treasurer of Haldimand, is the son of James Agnew Farrell of Magheramorne, County of Antrim, Ireland, being the youngest child in a family of eight children. His father was a land owner near Larne, The maiden name of his mother was Letitia Armenella Turnly. He received an English and classical education, and when a little past his majority, in 1833, emigrated to Upper Canada, settling in the Township of Dunn on the shore of Lake Erie, being the first permanent settler in that part of the township. The country was then very little changed from its primitive state; good roads were a convenience unknown, and in order to reach the lake shore from Hamilton, Mr. Farrell hired two Indians who took him from Brantford down the Grand river in a log canoe. He purchased a log cabin and a few acres of cleared land of a squatter, opened a farm and remained on it until 1851. When the rebellion broke out in 1837, Mr. Farrell and his few neighbors immediately met, formed a company, and he was elected captain. The company was stationed at Fort Erie, under command of Colonel Kerby, and was preparing to storm Navy Island when the rebels abandoned it. On the renewal of disturbances a year or more later, Captain Farrell raised an independent company which was stationed for six months at Port Maitland, then the rendezvos of armed Government steamers. Some years later he was gazetted,Lieut. Colonel of the first battalion Haldimand Militia, and now has charge of the Regimental Division of the County of monck....

Biographical Sketch of Maitland McCarthy

Maitland McCarthy, Barrister, and first Mayor of the Town of Orangeville, was born at Oakley Park, near Dublin, May 5, 1841. His parentage, &c., may be seen in the sketch of his elder brother, D’Alton McCarthy, Barrister, found on another page. He came to Canada when about eight years old; was educated in the same grammar school, County of Simcoe; studied law with his father and D’Arcy Boulton, at Barrie; was admitted to practice in 1861, and opened an office at Orangeville, and has here been in constant practice since that date, being called to the Bar at Michaelmas Term, 1876. He does business in all the Courts, and has had a good practice from the start. He has good abilities, is studious and well read; is of quick perceptions, and has gained for himself a high reputation and standing as a lawyer, as also in other walks of life. Mr. McCarthy was Reeve of the Village of Orangeville four years, and when it became an incorporated town, in 1874, he was elected Mayor, serving one term and then retiring. While at the head of the Municipality of the Village and in the County Council, and while chief magistrate of the town, he gave a good deal of attention to local matters, and aided very essentially in starting and securing the completion of different enterprises of importance to Orangeville and the County. Mr. McCarthy is a Master Mason, a churchman, and has been for several years warden of St. Mark’s Church. He is a gentleman of sterling character. His wife was Miss Jennie Frances Stewart, sister of Falkner C....

Biography of John Flesher

John Flesher, late member of the Ontario Legislature, and one of the leading business men of Orangeville, is descended from an. old Yorkshire family, and was born in Driffield, that county, June 8, 1833. His father, the Rev. John Flesher, of Forestmoore House, near Knaresbro, was for some years a Methodist minister, a man of uncommon ability, being a vigorous writer and eloquent speaker. Young Flesher was educated in a Collegiate Institute at Ramsgate, and came to Upper Canada in 1847 with his elder brother, Wm. Kingston Flesher, who, a few years ago, represented East Grey in the House of Commons. After spending two or three years with this brother, he commenced mercantile pursuits, first in Bolton, Albion, and later with Walker and Sons, Toronto; after which he entered business for himself in the County of Grey. One year later he purchased his brothers mill property in Adjala, and for ten years was engaged in the manufacture of flour and lumber. In 1868 Mr. Flesher settled in Orangeville, and again engaged in mercantile pursuits. A few years ago he sold out that business, and is now engaged in brokerage and conveyencing. While a resident of Adjala, Mr. Flesher served as a School Trustee for some years; since removing to Orangeville has been in the Council for four or five years, and in January, 1875, was elected to the Local Assembly to represent the Riding of Cardwell, serving his full term, and being defeated for reelection by a very small majority. Mr. Flesher is a Conservative, a conscientious and earnest advocate of the principles of that party, and controlling its...

Biography of Lorenzo D. Raymond

Lorenzo Dulmage Raymond, Clerk of the Peace and County Attorney, is a native of the County of Leeds, Ontario, dating his birth September 28, 1811. The Raymonds are a New England family, originally English. His father, Truman Raymond, M. D., coming from Massachusetts in 1808, settling in the old Johnston district, acting as surgeon at Gananoque in the war of 1812-14; was Coroner of Lincoln and Welland when united; a pioneer in the temperance cause in the Niagara District, and a very excellent man, dying at Welland in 1861. The mother of Lorenzo was Elizabeth Dulmage, whose father was a United Empire Loyalist, a Lieutenant in the British Army in 1775-1783, and drew his lands on the St. Lawrence, just below Prescott. Lorenzo is the eldest of four children who grew up, two sons and two daughters. The other son has since died. One daughter is the wife of R. A. Clarke, of St. Catharines; the other is unmarried. In 1824 the family moved westward to Niagara, where our subject was educated by the Rev. Thomas Creen, and studied law with Charles Richardson, being called to the Bar at Trinity term, June, 1835, Mr. Raymond practiced his profession at Chippawa until the close of the rebellion in 1838, acting as a soldier during that exciting period, and then moved to St. Catharines, where he continued his practice and his connection with the military, being promoted, step by step, to a Captaincy in the 5th Lincoln, Lieut. Colonel John Clark, commander. From 1845 to 1853 he again resided in Chippawa; and returning to St. Catharines he remained there until the...

Biography of David D. Hay, M.P.P.

David Donalson Hay, member of the Ontario Parliament for North Perth, was born in Brought Ferry, near Dundee, Scotland, January 20, 1828. His father was Robert Hay, a contractor and superintendent of works, and belonged to an old Scotch family. His mother’s maiden name was Catharine McKiddie. He received a good English education including mathematics, at parish and private schools; at sixteen years of age crossed the Atlantic ocean to try his fortune in the new world, being alone and depending on his own resources. After spending a few months in a mercantile house in the City of Montreal, came as far west as Bowmanville, County of Durham, where he was a clerk for Bowman and Simpson for a few years; and went thence to Lefroy, in the County of Simcoe, where he kept a store until 1853, when he settled in Elma, County of Perth. This township then included the present site of Listowel, which village, at that time, was known as Mapleton. There was only one house in the place. One of the foremost business men in the village. He has been Clerk of the Division Court for twenty years; was Reeve of Elm, seven years, and has been Reeve of Listowel an equal length of time, and has been serving at different times as Trustee of local schools. In 1867 Mr. Hay took a leading part in promoting the construction of the southern extension of the Wellington, Grey and Bruce Railroad, spending many months in the country working up the enterprise; and it is generally admitted that but for his indefatigable and persistent efforts, the road...

Biography of Lambert R. Bolton

The Bolton family is thoroughly identified with the history of the Township of Albion and the County of Peel, some of its members having figured quite prominently in this locality. James Bolton, one of the pioneers in Albion, and the grandfather of our subject, came from the County of Suffolk, England, to Upper Canada in 1818; his occupation was that of a carpenter and builder. He settled in Albion, near the Humber, the next year. We learn from the “Historical Atlas of Peel County,” that he erected the first grist mills at Weston, Newmarket, Lloydtown and Tecumseh, and also a number of buildings in the City of Toronto and the neighborhood. He was quite a noted man, and active, using his pen as well as voice in opposing the “Family Compact,” and taking a prominent part in politics previous to the Rebellion, leaving the country at the time of the outbreak, and dying in Indiana in 1838. He left six sons, of whom Charles the eldest son, was the father of our subject. He was born in England in 1804; married Catharine Parker, daughter of William Parker of Albion, in 1827; bought the farm that year which covered part of the present village of Bolton; was a farmer and subsequently a merchant here, and died in 1863; held the offices of School Commissioner under the old law, School Trustee, Deacon of the Congregational Church, the latter office he held till his death, and was a noble Christian man, a valuable citizen of the place. His brothers were, George Bolton, a farmer, who died at Fordwich, County of Huron, in...

Biography of John Creasor

John Creasor, twenty-five years a Barrister at Owen Sound, is a native of the County of Simcoe, being born near Barrie, January 21, 1833. He is a son of John Creasor, senior, farmer, and subsequently Division Court Bailiff, and Margaret nee Anderson. His father was from Yorkshire, England; his mother from Glasgow, Scotland. He was educated at the Barrie Grammar School; commenced studying law at Barrie with Hon. James Patton, and finished at Toronto with the late Judge Cooper; was called to the Bar at Michaelmas Term, 1854; soon afterwards settled in Owen Sound, and has here been in general practice, doing business in all the Courts. He is of the firm of Creasor and Morrison, who are doing a good business, and stand well. Mr. Creasor is a sound lawyer, a fair advocate, and a strictly honest and honorable man. He was County Crown Attorney a while, and resigned; holds the office of Solicitor of the County Council of Grey, and of the Town of Owen Sound; was in the Town Council four years, and is, and has been for twenty years, a trustee of the Town schools, doing all he can to further the interests of education. He occupies the position of Chairman of the Education Committee of the Board. Mr. Creasor was Captain of the Owen Sound Volunteers several years; was stationed with his company at Sarnia about three months during the Fenian raids of 1866; was subsequently appointed Major, and retired from the military service a few years ago, with the rank of Captain. In the Masonic fraternity he is Past Master, and is First...

Biography of David Robertson, M.D., M.P.P.

David Robertson, the leading physician and surgeon in Milton, and a member of the Ontario Legislature for Halton, is a native of this county, and was born in the Township of Esquesing, July 9, 1841. His father, Alexander Robertson, was from Perthshire, Scotland; his mother, whose maiden name was Nancy Moore, from New England. The father of our subject, born in Perthshire, 1785, was the grandson of Colonel Donald Robertson, of Woodshiel, who commanded the Clan Robertson at the battle of Culloden, April 16, 1746, in which he was severely wounded. On recovering he made his escape to France, and saved his head but lost his property. Prince Charles thought so highly of him that he procured a Colonel’s commission for him in the French Army, in which he served for more than a quarter of a century. While in that country he married a French lady, greatgrandmother to our subject. Alexander Robertson entered the British Army when quite young, and obtained an officer’s commission, serving in the Peninsular war, where he was so seriously wounded that he was obliged to retire from the service. After a few years’ residence in the West Indies, he came to Canada and settled in Esquesing in the County of Halton, among the pioneers in this locality. At first he followed surveying and school teaching, and subsequently farming, and was one of the first magistrates in the Township of Esquesing. He did business for the early settlers for miles round, by whom he was known as ” Squire Robertson.” He was the father of eight children, and died at Esquesing in 1853. His...
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