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Defrees, Margaret Elayne Rice Mrs. – Obituary

Margaret Elayne Defrees, 71, died Dec. 1, 2005, at her home in Sumpter Valley. Her funeral will be at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 2625 Hughes Lane. Vault interment will be at Mount Hope Cemetery. Bishop Jeff Daniels of Baker City 1st Ward will conduct. Margaret was born on Feb. 6, 1934, at Yakima, Wash., to Dallas and Kathryn Rice. She lived her first 13 years at the White Swan Christian Indian Mission where her parents were superintendents of the mission school. Her high school and junior college years were spent at Yakima where she graduated in 1954 from Yakima Valley Junior College. She continued her education at Oregon State College in Corvallis, graduating in 1956 with a degree in home economics. Margaret taught home economics at Gervais and at Tenino, Wash., until shortly after her marriage. Margaret met the love of her life during a blind date at an Oregon State football game. A. Lyle Defrees and Margaret were married a little over a year later on Dec. 27, 1956, in Yakima, Wash. They spent the first two years of their married life at Olympia, Wash., while Lyle was in the U.S. Army stationed at Fort Lewis. In 1958, they moved to the Defrees family ranch in Sumpter Valley where she resided the remainder of her life. Margaret’s life work was her family. She and Lyle raised three children, Nancy, Dean and Cheryl. She was a loyal wife, a gentle and caring mother and a loving grandmother. Margaret was a skilled seamstress, a superb cook, an avid gardener and a willing...

Beam, Delilah Lillian Siegler Mrs.

Baker City, Oregon Lillian S. Beam, 83, a longtime Baker City resident, died July 13, 2004, at St. Elizabeth Health Care Center. Her funeral will be at 10 a.m. Friday at Gray’s West & Co., 1500 Dewey Ave. The Rev. Ed Niswender of the Calvary Baptist Church will officiate. Vault interment will be at Mount Hope Cemetery. Visitations will be until 8 o’clock tonight at Gray’s West & Co. She was born Delilah Lillian Siegler on Sept. 1, 1920, at Kulm, N.D., to John and Katherina Weisser Siegler. After finishing her schooling, she traveled West with her sister, Viola, to Tacoma, Wash., where they both went to work at Madigan Army Hospital. It was there she met and married Robert “Bob” Beam in November of 1946. They made their home at Olympia, Wash., until Bob was discharged from the service. At that time they moved to Unity where Bob’s parents, Ralph and Rose, lived. They later moved to Mount Vernon and John Day, but eventually made Baker City their home. Together they had four children, Tom, Susan, John and Mike. After 26 years of marriage they divorced, but they always stayed close. Bob died in 1990. Lillian spent most of her life as a devoted homemaker, wife and mother. You could always count on a good meal at her home. After the children got older, Lillian went to work for the Hereford Motel in Baker City and later moved to the Oregon Trail Motel where she ended her working career. Lillian was a member of the Royal Neighbors of America for a number of years and enjoyed traveling to...

Seattle, New Tacoma and Olympia, Washington

Seattle, the metropolis of Washington, in 1880 had 7,000 inhabitants, and property valued at something over four millions. Its manufactures comprised three ship-yards, three foundries, two breweries, one tannery, three boiler-shops, six sash and door factories, five machine-shops, six sawmills, three brick yards, three fish packing factories, one fish cannery, one barrel factory, one ice factory, one soda water factory, besides boot and shoe shops, tin shops, and other minor industries. The commerce of Seattle with the coastline of settlements was considerable; but the chief export is coal from the mines cast of Lake Washington. There were few public buildings except churches, of which there were ten, besides the hall and reading room of the Young Men’s Christian Association. The university, whose early history has been given, was in as flourishing a condition as an institution without a plentiful endowment could be. In connection with the university there was a society of naturalists numbering 23 young men, whose cabinet was valued at $3,000. The building occupied by their cabinet was furnished by A. A. Denny, to be enlarged as required. The officers were: W. Hall, president; E. S. Meany, vice-president; H. Jacobs, secretary; F. M. Hall, assistant secretary; C. L. Denny, librarian; A. M. White, treasurer; and J. D. Young, marshal. Seattle Evening Herald, Dec. 22, 1883. The lesser towns of King county are: Newcastle, Renton, Dwamish, Black River, Fall City, Slaughter, White River, Snoqualimich, Squak, Quilleyute, and Quillieene. New Tacoma The second town in size on Puget Sound in 1885 was New Tacoma, population 4,000. Old Tacoma, become a suburb of its younger rival, was a pretty village...

Biographical Sketch of Thomas M. Alvord

THOS. M. ALVORD. – Mr. Alvord was born in Homer, Courtland county, New York, February 26, 1832, and is the son of Sylvester and Lucy Hull Alvord. His grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, serving under General Washington, and took up a Donation claim on the present site of Homer, New York. His father was born on the place, and died in 1864. He resided at his birthplace until 1853, when with his brother, Henry S., he left New York on board the Prometheus, via Nicaragua, and on the Pacific side took the Cortez, arriving in San Francisco December 1, 1853. He then went to Calaveras county and followed mining for three and a half years, with fair success, and during the summers followed farming. In December, 1854, his brother returned to the East and visited the coast again in the summer of 1889. On the breaking out of the Frazer river excitement, he came north, but only remained a short time, returning to Olympia in December, 1858, and prospecting the county for a location. In February, 1859, he purchased the Donation claim of Moses Kirkland and wife. This consisted of 320 acres, to which he has since added, until now he owns 1,100 acres half a mile from the town of Kent. In 1884, he built his present beautiful home, and is now engaged in general farming and largely in the dairy business, shipping a large quantity of milk to Seattle, He has, unlike his neighbors, never entered into hop-raising. Mr. Alvord is Republican in politics, though not a politician, and never having held an office....

Biography of John Carson

JOHN CARSON. – Few, indeed, combine so many of those characteristics of frontier life, have undergone those experiences, successfully passed through those vicissitudes, which, aggregated and embodied in the life of one man, constitute him in the true sense a “pioneer,” as he whose name heads this sketch. It but feebly represents his real worth and genuine manhood. The picture is incomplete which fails to show those struggles and hardships and sacrifices to which he and his little family were subjected in their journey to this country, in their labor to make a dwelling-place in the wilderness, and to open the way by which American men, and women and children might appropriate these regions and dedicate them as homes. The busy, thoughtless throng which later followed, and converted solitude into society, have pushed into the background the early settlers, – those who had transformed the wilderness into garden spots, thereby inducing the masses to come to the Pacific slope and cast their lot in Oregon and Washington. They who dedicated the wilderness as appropriate residences for the myriads who have followed will yet live in history; those who pushed back the savage to give place to our race, who made Washington Territory a practicable and peaceable abiding place for women and children, will be recognized as the true commonwealth-builders, the avant-couriers and establishers of our Pacific civilization. Such, in every sense of the word, was John Carson, who lives, at a green old age and full of activity, at Puyallup, Pierce county, Washington. He was born January 25, 1828, in Butler county, Pennsylvania. His father was a farmer; and...

Biography of Hon. John B. Allen

HON. JOHN B. ALLEN. – “I think Walla Walla is destined to be the central and commercial city of that large area of country in Eastern Washington lying south of the Snake river, and of much of Eastern Oregon. Probably no city of its population in the Northwest equals it in wealth. It is just now emerging from years of transportation extortions, which few other regions could have borne. Competitive systems will infuse new life to every industry, and stimulate the developments of resources heretofore lying dormant.” This is the horoscope of the young city as cast by Mr. Allen; and his opinions are certainly of great weight. He has been a resident of the territory since 1870; and, as United States attorney for Washington under Grant, Hayes and Garfield, he has visited nearly every locality within the field of his labors; and his opportunities for forming correct judgment have been very extensive. While a citizen of Dayton or Pendleton could not be expected to agree with him fully, and Spokane Falls and North Yakima would naturally demur from his opinion that the Blue Mountain slopes are the finest in the territory, the unbiased mind will, at least, regard his view with interest. Mr. Allen is one of the territory’s most prominent citizens. As delegate to the United States Congress, he has achieved a lasting fame, and will leave the stamp of his mind upon history. He is a native of Indiana, having been born at Crawfordsville, in that state in 1843. He was educated at Wabash College, but at the age of nineteen joined the “hundred-days” men and...

Biography of William Billings

WM. BILLINGS. – The name Billings at once suggests the picturesque hills and valleys of Vermont; and we find that the subject of this sketch is indeed a Green Mountain boy, having been born in Ripton in 1827. He lived upon his father’s place until 1846, and in that year went down to New Bedford and shipped before the mast. This step brought him to Washington Territory; for, in 1849, he was left at Honolulu, from whence, in the bark Mary, he came to California, the gold of the Yuba mines detaining him but a few months. Indeed, the best place to obtain California gold was not always in California. He came to Portland in the autumn, and found employment in hewing timber for the first steam sawmill in that embryo city. Remaining here until 1852, he joined a company of seventy gold hunters who bought the brig Eagle for the purpose of going to Queen Charlotte’s Island prospecting. The expedition proved a failure; and the company returned to the mainland, disbanding and selling their vessel at Olympia. Being thus landed in his future home, Mr. Billings located a claim three miles from town and followed lumbering three years. But the war of 1855 called him from this peaceful and remunerative occupation, making a soldier of him for a year. He served in the Yakima country, and after his discharge in 1856 busied himself a number of years at Olympia in whatever enterprise or business came to hand. In 1860 he entered the field of politics, being the nominee of the Republican party for sheriff of Thurston county. In...

Biography of Hon. R. O. Dunbar

HON. R.O. DUNBAR. – It is not always an enviable distinction to be made eminent for political preferments. The exceptions are in the cities where office is held as the currency of political services, and as the opportunity for public plunder. In the smaller communities, however, where personal acquaintance extends to all citizens, and an honest public spirit precludes fraud, one may well feel pride in that confidence of his friends in his ability and probity which selects him as a public servant. Preferment at the suffrage of the citizens of a place like Goldendale, noted for its correct sentiment and love of cleanliness, would therefore be gratifying. Mr. Dunbar has been an office holder of this kind for many years. His political sphere is, however, by no means confined to the town of Goldendale, as he has represented the county of Klikitat in the territorial council, and during one session served that body as speaker. He has served upon important committees, and has introduced important legislative measures. He has been attorney for that district, embracing Klikitat, Yakima, Skamania and Clarke counties, and as a prominent Republican has long been before the party as a probable candidate for delegate to Congress. Mr. Dunbar was born in Schuyler county, Illinois, in 1845. He crossed the plains when but one year old, enduring the trip bravely. His parents christened him Ralph Oregon, in commemoration of his early introduction into that state, and at their fine home and productive farm in the Waldo hills brought him up to a vigorous manhood. At the age of nineteen he began his studies, entering the...

Biography of Rev. John F. Devore, D. D.

REV. JOHN F. DEVORE, D.D. – Doctor Devore was a native of Kentucky, being born near Lexington, December 7, 1817. He was of French descent, as the name indicates, and owed very much to the pious example of religious parents, who urged him with their last words to be “faithful to his God.” The “Life of Bramwell” fell into his hands at an early date, was read with great relish, and had much to do in molding the shape of his after life. Entering the ministry, he joined the Rock river conference in 1842, Bishop Roberts presiding. He was ordained deacon at Milwaukee in 1844 by Bishop Morris, and elder at Galena, Illinois, in 1846 by Bishop Hamline. In May, 1853, he was transferred to the Oregon conference by Bishop Waugh, and arrived with his family at Steilacoom, Washington Territory, the latter part of August in that year, and entered at once upon his singularly interesting and successful career of ministerial labor on this coast, embracing a period of thirty-six eventful years. While in the Oregon conference, Doctor Devore’s appointments were as follows: Steilacoom two years, 1853-55; Olympia one year, 1855-56; presiding elder Puget Sound district three years, 1856-59; Vancouver two years, 1859-61; The Dalles two years, 1861-63; East Tualitan two years, 1863-65; Milwaukee one year, 1865-66; presiding elder Portland district four years, 1870-74; Vancouver two years, 1874-76; Albany three years, 1876-79; Seattle two years; 1879-81; Tacoma three years, 1881-84. In the Puget Sound conference, organized in 1884, by Bishop Fowler, Doctor Devore’s appointments were as follows: West Tacoma two years, 1884-86; presiding elder Olympia district one year, 1886-87;...
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