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Biographical Sketch of Thomas G. Redfield

THOMAS G. REDFIELD. – Mr. Redfield, one of the substantial citizens and capable business men of North Yakima, Washington, was born in Illinois in 1851. During his infancy he accompanied his parents across the plains to Oregon, and in 1854 was domiciled with them at their home upon Cow creek in Douglas county, Oregon. With the exception of two years in California, Mr. Redfield’s early life was spent in Oregon; and upon reaching an age of independence, he found no field more promising than Yakima county. He accordingly located at Yakima City in 1881, opening out a jewelry store, and doing a successful business. Three years later he moved with the rest of the business houses to North Yakima, and since that time has been carrying on a thriving industry in watches and jewelry. He is one of the property owners of the place, and a citizen of recognized merit. He was married in Josephine county, Oregon, June 6, 1879, to Miss Metta Davis of California. They have five children, one of whom is...

Biography of Leonard L. Thorp

LEONARD L. THORP. – This pioneer of the Yakima country is a native of Oregon, having been born in Polk county in 1845. He came to Klikitat county, at the present site of Goldendale, as early as 1858, and to the Yakima in 1861, engaging in stock-raising in the Moxee and Selah valleys until 1870, when he occupied his present place three miles from North Yakima, Washington territory, consisting of one hundred and twenty acres of very rich land. He also owns eighty acres somewhat nearer town, upon which he has an extensive orchard with a very fine exposure, and other requisites for the successful culture of fruit. His principal business is handling large lots of cattle, and delivering them to the various cities of the Sound. The early pioneer days of Mr. Thorp were eventful with the experiences relating to a frontiersman’s life. When he was but a boy of sixteen, the lonely family was surprised one morning by the appearance of an Indian war party bearing down upon the cabin. Hastily hiding the women in the feather beds, the father and son stationed themselves behind the fence out of sight of the Indians, who were approaching, with old Smohallah at their head, to reconnoiter. They were armed and mounted, and were decked with war paint. As they reached the fence, the elder Thorp sprang over the fence and seized the chief’s horse by the bridle, covering Smohallah himself with his revolver, and demanding the reason for such a warlike approach. Being quick-witted, the old Indian smiled and offered to shake hands in friendly fashion, saying, by way...

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