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Biography of Jesse S. Wilson

Jesse S. Wilson was a prominent and successful stockman in Illinois for many years, but in the spring of 1912 transferred his interests to Kansas. He spent a few months at Emporia but in the fall of that year located at Hamilton in Greenwood County. Mr. Wilson is proprietor of twelve hundred acres of land, constituting a splendid ranch, and some of the finest cattle and horses in the state are kept on that ranch or are shipped from there to market. Mr. Wilson is both a stock farmer and stock dealer. His ranch is situated five miles northwest of Hamilton. He belongs to a pioneer family of Tasewell County, Illinois, where he was born October 23, 1861. The Wilsons were originally Kentuckians and earlier than that were from Scotland. Three brothers of the same came over to Virginia in Colonial days, crossed the mountains into Kentucky, and grandfather William Wilson was born at Lexington, Kentucky, in the blue grass region of that state in April, 1801. He first went to Illinois in 1817, or before Illinois became a state, but returned to Kentucky. In 1827 he became a pioneer settler on a farm in Tazewell County where he spent the rest of his years. He died in Hopedale Township of Tazewell County, May 4, 1864. William Wilson married Nancy Spemcer, who was born in Covington, Kentucky, and died in Tazewell County, Illinois. Two of their children are still living. Joe is a retired farmer at Richill, Missouri, and in his time was one of the foremost cattle men of the state. Frances is living at Minier in Tazewell...

Biography of Nathan T. Veatch

Nathan T. Veatch has beenĀ superintendentĀ of the city schools of Atchison since 1901. He is a veteran educator, and was teacher, principal or superintendent for a number of years before he came to Kansas. A native of Illinois, he was born on a farm near Astoria in Fulton County February 25, 1852, grew up in Schuyler County, attended the public schools, and had been teaching almost continuously since 1879. He taught his first term in Schuyler County, Illinois. In 1881 he was graduated from the Illinois Normal University at Normal. Mr. Veatch taught in Brown County, Illinois, was principal of a ward school at Little Rock, Arkansas, four years, and for fourteen years was superintendent of schools at Rushville. Then in 1901 he accepted the call to Atchison and had since been head of the school system of that city. Superintendent Veatch had under his management seven schools, a staff of seventy teachers, and about 2,200 scholars. His ancestors were English and Scotch who came from the North of England in Colonial times, locating in Delaware and Maryland. His grandfather, Nathan Veatch, was born in Indiana, and married Elizabeth Evans, for whose family the City of Evansville, Indiana, was named. Nathan Veatch was a farmer and a pioneer settler at Astoria, Illinois, but his declining years were spent with his son B. M. Veatch at Keytesville, Missouri, where he died. In politics he was a whig. He and his wife had the following children: B. M. Veatch, who served as a captain in the Union army during the Civil war and afterwards engaged in the real estate business at Keytesville,...

Biographical Sketch of Lyman W. Childs

Childs, Lyman W.; physician; born, Lee, Ill., Oct. 1, 1867; son of Charles and Ann Eliza Smith Childs; graduate, Illinois State Normal University, 1890, at Western Reserve Medical College, 1894, studied in University of Vienna, 1899-1900; married, Waterloo, Ia., 1902, Colene C. Hogg; issue, Evelyn L., Frances B., Eleanor M., Lyman W., Jr.; member sanitation committee, Chamber of Commerce, for three years; instrumental in introduction of medical inspection in Cleveland public schools; introduced first fresh air school in Cleveland in 1911; house physician, City Hospital, 1894; medical examiner, Cleveland Public Schools, 1910-1913; member Cleveland Medical Society and American Medical Ass’n;...

Biography of George H. Hunter

George H. Hunter, a resident of Wellington almost forty years, is one of the leading millers of the state, is president of the oldest bank in Wellington, and has also given much of his time and energies to public affairs, being the present mayor of Wellington. He was born on a farm near Circleville, Ohio, December 1, 1849, one of the five children of Alexander M. and Sophia (Zepp) Hunter, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. Sophia Zepp was of Pennsylvania Dutch extraction, and when a child was brought to Ohio by her uncle and aunt. Alexander M. Hunter enlisted at the outbreak of the Civil war, but on account of physical disability was not accepted for service. He was a republican and a member of the Congregational Church. He came out to Wellington, was associated with his son in the flour mill from 1879 until 1910, and one day while fishing on a railway bridge was killed by a train, being then nearly ninety years of age. When George H. Hunter was six months of age his parents moved to a farm in Shelby County, Illinois. He had only the advantages of the district schools and his higher education was gained largely through his own efforts and by paying his own expenses through the State Normal University at Normal, Illinois. At the age of twenty he entered that school and was graduated at twenty-three. After one year as a teacher he engaged, in 1872, in the mercantile business and followed it with considerable success for six years in Illinois. Desiring a larger field,...

Biography of Jasper Newton Wilkinson

Jasper Newton Wilkinson of Muskogee is widely known as a most enthusiastic Rotarian and as an untiring worker in the interests of boys. In the latter connection he is state councilor of the Order of DeMolay for Boys and is doing a work of far-reaching importance. In the business world, too, he has made a creditable name and place for himself as a lumber dealer in Illinois and as a banker in Oklahoma. He was born in Vinton County, Ohio, a son of Jackson and Mary (Morrison) Wilkinson, both of southern descent. In 1874 he was graduated from the Illinois State Normal University at Normal, Illinois, and took up the profession of teaching in a primary school. His advancement in the professional field was continuous, bringing him eventually to the presidency of the Kansas State Normal Schools at Emporia, Hays and Pittsburg. He was also President of the Kansas State Teachers Association in 1889 and was Treasurer of the National Education Association from 1905 until 1907. He gained a very wide acquaintance in educational circles by reason of his ability, his initiative and his undaunted progressiveness in this field. Mr. Wilkinson was also the founder of The Wilkinson Company, which conducted a lumber business at Bement and three other points in Illinois, and in 1906 he purchased the Citizens Bank of Pryor, Oklahoma, of which he was President until he sold the controlling interest in 1910. Mr. Wilkinson is now giving sixty per cent of his time to the Order of DeMolay for Boys, which is an organization composed of boys from sixteen to twenty-one years of age, who...

Biography of Henry Drum

HENRY DRUM. – Among the progressive, intelligent and enterprising business men who are lending their energy and strength to the constant and rapid development of the great resources of the State of Washington, no name stands higher, or is more widely known and deservedly popular, than that of Henry Drum. No more conspicuous example of the results of careful attention to business, probity of character and steadfastness of purpose, can be cited than the brilliant career of Tacoma’s ex-mayor. It is to this class of young, keen and active workers that the great Northwest is to-day indebted for its magnificent prosperity and unparalleled growth. Always foremost in every enterprise for the upbuilding of the city and territory at large, he has achieved a name and reputation that many men of the allotted three score years and ten might well feel proud of. Although but thirty-two years of age, no name is better known in Western Washington than that of the young senator from Pierce county. The same strength of purpose and untiring pursuit of objects aimed at having characterized him from boyhood to the mature man; and the earnestness of youth has been combined with the calm judgement of riper years to create the pushing but prudent business man and careful financier and adviser. Mr. Drum was born in the town of Girard, Macoupin county, Illinois, on November 21, 1857, and is therefore but thirty-two years of age. He attended the public schools of Girard during his childhood; but, not content with the education to be received from that source, he set earnestly to work to fit himself for...

Biography of William Miller Kenton

William Miller Kenton first came to Kansas nearly forty years ago, acquired an interest in a homestead in Rice County, and by his subsequent exertions had developed a large amount of fine farming land and is one of the leading men of affairs and citizens at Chase. Mr. Kenton was born in Bracken County, Kentucky, October 4, 1850. His Kenton ancestry goes back to the earliest period of colonization of the Kentucky country and the name of Kenton is a famous one in old Kentucky, and doubtless there is some relationship between this branch and the noted Simon Kenton, one of the greatest scouts, frontiersmen and Indian fighters in American annals. The first American ancestor was Marcus Kenton, who came out of Oxford, England, and settled in old Virginia. This Marcus Kenton was early attracted to the Virginia possessions west of the Allegheny Mountains in what is now Kentucky, and his death occurred in Pennsylvania while he was en route from his Virginia home to the place known as Limestone, now Maysville, Kentucky. This Marcus Kenton married a member of the Cleveland family, and some of the later generations more or less jokingly referred to her as a connection of the President of the United States. Marcus Kenton, the immigrant, had a son who bore his name and who came into possession of 18,000 acres of land in Kentucky, lying south of Licking River and extending in the direction of Millersburg. This was acquired from the Federal Government in consideration for services rendered during the Revolution. This Marcus Kenton in his will remembered his brother Philip C. Kenton, giving...

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