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Biographical Sketch of John S. McCarrens

McCarrens, John S.; advertising; born, July 27, 1869; son of D. A. and Anna McGinley McCarrens; educated, public schools, Bradford, Pa., and Niagara University, Suspension Bridge, N. Y.; married, Toledo, O., June 24, 1896, Mary Sweeney; issue, two daughters and two sons; advertising mgr. and business collector; member Cleveland Advertising Club. Fond of Horseback...

Biography of Charles E. Spooner

Charles E. Spooner. When he started upon his wage-earning career, at the age of fifteen years, Charles E. Spooner began at the bottom of the ladder in the capacity of bundle-boy in a department store. No favors were shown him, for he had no important friends or other favoring influences, but his fidelity, energy and ability won him recognition and promotion and he soon grew beyond the opportunities of his immediate environment, and from that time his advancement has been sure and steady. In 1888 he became connected with the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad, in a minor position and in the service of this line he has continued to the present, his position at this time being that of general auditor of the line, with headquarters at Parsons. Charles E. Spooner was born at Toronto, Ontario, Canada, March 11, 1858, and is a son of J. J. B. and Mary (Brewer) Spooner and a member of a family which originated in England and emigrated to New York during colonial days. His great-great-grandfather, William Spooner, fought as a soldier of the Continental line during the Revolutionary war, and his grandfather was “Col.” Alden Spooner, who passed his life at Brooklyn, New York, where he was publisher of the Long Island Star, a pioneer newspaper. J. J. B. Spooner, father of Charles E., was born in 1820, in Brooklyn, and as a lad was adopted by his maternal uncle, George W. Jermain, and was reared at Detroit, Michigan. He was married in the latter state, and there, having inherited his father’s journalistic abilities and inclinations, was for some time the...

Blakeslee, Caroline D. – Obituary

Caroline D. Blakeslee, age 90 years, 4 months and 22 days, died in La Grande Monday last, and the funeral took place from the Episcopal church, Union, Wednesday afternoon, the 30th inst. Mrs. Blakeslee was 90 years old, having been born in Lewiston, New York, September 6, 1827. She was married to Chas. L. Blakeslee, May 12, 1850, and lived in Battle Creek, Mich., until 1865, when they crossed the plains to Union, where she lived until 1910. Since that time she has loved with her daughter, Mrs. Oliver. Mr. Blakeslee passed away June 1, 1905. She is survived by one son, Dr. L. K. Blakeslee, of Pendleton, and two daughters, Mrs. W. A. Hall, of Union, and Mrs. J. R. Oliver, of La Grande. Funeral services were held in Union at the Episcopal church of which she was a member since 1869, having helped to organize the church at Union. January 28, 1918 Contributed by: Larry...

John Todd of Middleport NY

John Todd7, (David6, Abraham5, Abraham4, Jonah3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Sept. 5, 1806, in Peekskill, N. Y., died in 1884, married Eliza Agor. He moved to Middleport, N. Y., in the early thirties and bought land of the Holland Land Purchase from which he developed a good farm. Children: *1491. William Agor, b. March 28, 1833. *1492. Kelsey, b. Feb. 11,...

Charles Henry Todd of Lockport NY

Charles Henry Todd8, (Justus B.7, William6, Yale5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Sept. 6, 1847, died Dec. 30, 1908, married July 22, 1868, Marilla Augusta Willard, of Lockport, N. Y., who was born Sept. 3, 1849. He, too, was a miller and lived in Lockport, N. Y. He was shipping clerk at the Thompson Milling Company for over 25 years. Also, he was an Elder, Trustee and Treasurer of Calvery Presbyterian Church, in Lockport, N. Y. Children: 2285. Helen Hortense, b. Sept. 24, 1869, d. March 21, 1896, m. June 14, 1894, Charles C. Campbell. 2286. Harry Willard, b. Aug. 16, 1878, d. Nov. 24, 1894. 2287. Roland Beilamy, b. Dec., 1890, d. July 24,...

William Todd of Lockport NY

William Todd8, (Justus B.7, William6, Yale5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born June 30, 1845, married June 12, 1865, Delina Hollenbeck, of Lockport, N. Y., who was born Aug. 18, 1848. He was a miller and lived in Lockport, N. Y. Children: 2282. Charles A., b. June 30, 1866, d. Oct. 14, 1872. *2283. Frank C., b. Sept. 22, 1874. 2284. Frederick Bellamy, b. Dec. 23, 1879, d. Sept. 23,...

Kelsey Todd of Royalton NY

Kelsey Todd8, (John7, David6, Abraham5, Abraham4, Jonah3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Feb. 11, 1835, in Royalton, Niagara County, N. Y., died July 20, 1897, married Mary Janette Sawyer. He was a farmer, owning and operating the same farm which his father bought of the Holland Land Purchase. Children: *2215. Jennie L., b. Dec. 11, 1860. 2216. Jessie E., b. April 2, 1863, d. Jan. 18, 1883. 2217. Frank E., b. Oct. 6, 1871; he is engaged in the grain and produce business in Middleport, N....

Tuscarora Tribe

Tuscarora Indians, Tuscarora Nation (Skurū’rěn’, ‘hemp gatherers,’ the Apocynum cunnabinum, or Indian hemp, being a plant of many uses among the Carolina Tuscarora; the native form of this appellative is impersonal, there being no expressed pronominal affix to indicate person, number, or gender). Formerly an important confederation of tribes, speaking languages cognate with those of the Iroquoian linguistic group, and dwelling, when first encountered, on the Roanoke, Neuse, Taw (Torhunta or Narhontes), and Pamlico Rivers., North Carolina.

Osteological Remains

“In the town of Cambria, six miles west of Lockport, a Mr. Hammon, who was employed with his boy in hoeing corn, in 1824, observed some bones of a child, exhumed. No farther thought was bestowed upon the subject for a time, for the plain of the Ridge was supposed to have been the site of an Indian village, and this was supposed to be the remains of some child who had been recently buried there. Eli Bruce, hearing of the circumstance, proposed to Mr. Hammon that they should repair to the spot, with suitable instruments, and endeavor to find some relics. The soil was a light loam, which would be dry and preserve bones for centuries without decay. A search enabled them to come to a pit but a slight distance from the surface. The top of the pit was covered with small slabs of the Medina sandstone, and was twenty-four feet square, four and a half feet deep, planes agreeing with the four cardinal points. It was filled with human bones of both sexes and ages. They dug down at one extremity and found the same layers to extend to the bottom, which was the dry loam, and from their calculations, they deduced that at least four thousand souls had perished in one great massacre. In one skull two flint arrow-heads were found, and many had the appearance of having been fractured and cleft open by a sudden blow. They were piled in regular layers, but with no regard to size or sex. Pieces of pottery were picked up in the pit, and had also been plowed up...

Biography of Green Arnold

GREEN ARNOLD. – One of the earliest pioneers of the country lying east of the Cascade Mountains is the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. He was born in Niagara county, New York, in 1919, and received his education at his native place. In 1833, he moved to Michigan with his parents, where he remained until 1850, when hearing of the wonderful stories of the rich discoveries of gold in California, he buckled on his armor of faith and started across the plains, landing in Hangtown (now Placerville) on the 6th day of August of the same year. He remained in California till June 1, 1851, and then returned to Michigan, where he remained till 1852. He then recrossed the plains, landing in Milwaukee, Oregon, in October of the same year, where he went into the hotel business, and remained there until May, 1853, when he went to Champoeg. Here he again went into the hotel business, remaining until July, when he went to The Dalles, and from thence to Butter Creek, on the old emigrant trail in Umatilla county, with a pack train of goods, for the purpose of trading with the Indians and the emigrants then en route to the Willamette valley from across the plains. He remained at Butter Creek until October, when he returned to Champoeg, and in the spring of 1854, returned to Eastern Oregon and established a trading post in Grande Ronde valley, at the foot of what is now known as the Ladd hill, for the purpose of supplying the incoming emigrants with provisions. In October, 1853, he returned to the Umatilla...
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