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Establishment of Fort Smith in 1817

The white population in Arkansas in 1817 had increased to several thousand, whose protection, as well as that of the Cherokee people living in that territory, from the continued hostilities of the Osage, required the establishment of a military post at the western border dividing the white settlements from the Osage. From Saint Louis came further news of threatened hostilities by the Osage near Clermont’s Town, and a report1 that Major William Bradford with a detachment of United States riflemen, and accompanied by Major Long, topographical engineer, had left that city for the purpose of establishing a military post on the Arkansas near the Osage boundary. Major Stephen H. Long, at “Post of Ozark fifty miles up the Arkansas,” reported2 that he was ordered on a mission to the Forks of the Arkansas thence across country by land to Red River; thence to return by land to Saint Louis. “On the Arkansaw near the place where the Osage line strikes this river, I am to select a position for a military post to be under the command of Major Bradford, who is now at this place with his company, destined for that command. This business I am in hopes to accomplish by the first of December.” The point chosen by Long and Bradford for a military post was at the junction of the Poteau and Arkansas rivers called by the French, Belle Point, and after some years known as Fort Smith, after General Thomas A. Smith.3 On this expedition, Long ascended as high as the falls of the Verdigris, and made an observation of the longitude and latitude at...

Biographical Sketch of Edward M. Ruttenber

Journalist and historian, was born in the Town of Bennington, Vt., July 17, 1824. He entered the office of the Vermont Gazette as an apprentice to the printing business in 1837, and removed to Newburgh in 1838, where he became an indentured apprentice in the office of the Newburgh Telegraph, of which he became the owner in 1850. He was thereafter connected with Newburgh journalism as editor and publisher during his entire life, dying at the advanced age of 83 years on December 4, 1907, at Newburgh, N. Y. As a historian he was thorough and exhaustive, and to him, more than to any other local historian, is perhaps due the credit of preserving for future generations the vast mass of historical data relating to Orange County and the Hudson River Valley. He is the author of the following works: History of the Town of Newburgh, 1859; History of the Flags of New York Regiments, 1865; History of the Obstructions to the Navigation of the Hudson River, 1866; History of the Indian Tribes of the Hudson River, 1872; History of Orange County, 1881. All of these works are universally regarded as standard authorities on the subjects treated and show ample evidence of his exhaustive research and ability as a...

Biography of Joel Tyler Headley

Historian and journalist, was born Dec. 30, 1813, at Walton, Delaware County, N. Y. He died at Newburgh, N. Y., in 1897. He was the son of a Presbyterian minister settled at Walton. Early in life he determined to follow the ministry as a life work, and after graduating at Union College in 1839, he took a course in theology at Auburn Theological Seminary. After being admitted to the ministry he was settled over a church at Stockbridge, Mass. His health failing shortly after he was compelled to relinquish his chosen profession, and in 1842 traveled in Europe. His “Letters from Italy” attracted wide attention, and on his return Horace Greeley, the veteran editor of the New York Tribune, induced him to become an associate editor of the Tribune. After a year with the Tribune he severed his connection with that paper and thereafter pursued the path of authorship, residing continuously at Newburgh until his death. His published works are: Napoleon and His Marshals, which appeared in 1846, and was followed at various periods by Washington and His Generals; History of the War, 1812; Life of Cromwell; Life of Havelock; Life of Scott and Jackson; Sacred Mountains; Sacred Heroes and Martyrs; Headley’s Miscellanies; The Imperial Guard; Chaplains and Clergy of the Revolution; The Great Rebellion; Grant and Sherman; Life of Farragut and Our Naval Commanders; History of the Great Riots, and many other works of lesser note. During his long life he did not lay down his busy pen until 1854, when he was elected to the New York State Assembly from the First District of Orange County. In...

Biography of Major Edward Carlisle Boynton

Major E. C. Boynton, a graduate of West Point Military Academy, and for many years an instructor in that institution, is chiefly distinguished as the author of the “History of West Point and the Origin and Progress of the U. S. Military Academy,” and several technical works, all of which are regarded as standard authorities on the subjects of which they treat. He was appointed as a cadet at the United States Military Academy, July 1, 1841. After graduation in 1846, he was assigned to the Second Artillery as Brevet Second Lieutenant and ordered to join the army in, Mexico, where he served with General Taylor at the front of the invading force. He served at Monterey and at the seizure of Saltillo in 1846. He participated in the siege of Vera Cruz, the battles of Cerro Gardo, Contreras, Churubusco, in the seizure and occupation of Puebla and in the skirmishes at Amazoque and Oka Laka in 1847. He was severely wounded in the action at Cherubusco. He was promoted Second Lieutenant February 16, 1847, and First Lieutenant, August 20, 1847, and Brevet Captain at the same time for “gallant and meritorious services in the battles of Contreras and Cherubusco, Mexico.” In 1848 he was assigned to the Military Academy at West Point as Assistant Acting Quartermaster. From August, 1848, to September, 1855, he was Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology. In 1855-56 he accompanied the expedition against the Seminole Indians in Florida. The degree of A. M. was conferred on him by Brown University in 1856. In 1856 he was appointed Professor of Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology...

Biographical Sketch of Benjamin Barker Odell

Benjamin B. Odell, thirty-seventh Governor of the State of New York, was born at Newburgh, N. Y., January 14, 1854. He was the son of Benjamin Barker and Ophelia (Bookstaver,) Odell. He graduated from Newburgh Academy in 1874, and entered Bethany College, in Bethany, W. Va., the same year. He remained there one year, after which he entered Columbia College, New York City, where he continued until 1877. He married Estelle Crist, of Newburgh, April 25, 1877; she died in 1888. His second wife was Mrs. Linda (Crist,) Traphagen, a sister of his first wife, whom he married in 1891. He was a member of the Republican State Committee 1884-96; Chairman of the Republican State Executive Committee 1898-1900; Member of the 54th and 55th Congresses 1895-9, 17th New York District; Governor of New York, two terms, 1901-5. He died at Newburgh, N. Y., May 9, 1926, aged 72...

Biographical Sketch of Robert L. Ireland

Ireland, Robert L.; with M. A. Hanna & Co.; born, Stratford, Conn., Aug. 20, 1867; son of John B. and Adelia Duane Ireland; educated, Stamford, Conn., Newburgh, N. Y., and Yale, graduating in 1890; married, May 2, 1894, Kate Benedict Hanna; issue, Robert Livingston Ireland, Jr., born Feb. 2, 1895, and Elizabeth Ireland, born Oct. 30, 1898; business career, with the Cleveland Hardware Co., Hackney Bicycle Co., Globe Iron Works, Ship Owners Dry Dock Co., Cleveland Dry Dock Ca.; instrumental in the consolidation of the shipbuilding interests of the Great Lakes; organization being known as the American Ship Building Co.; was vice pres. until 1903; partner in the firm of M. A. Hanna & Co.; identified and officially connected with many corporations; member advisory board of The Citizens Savings & Trust Co., and the Cleveland Trust Co.; member Union, Tavern, Athletic. Hunt, Roadside, Gentleman’s Driving, and Mayfield Country Clubs, of Cleveland, and University, and Yale Clubs, New York...

Biographical Sketch of G. T. Kilner

G. T. Kilner, druggist, Mattoon; was born in Manchester, Eng., Nov. 18, 1820; at the age of 15 years, he was left an orphan, and, in 1836, emigrated to America, and first settled in Waterbury, Conn.; here he engaged in the sale of drugs six years; he then moved to Newburgh, N. Y., where he engaged in the same business; in the spring of 1860, he came West and located in Mattoon, opened up his business here; his is the first drug store established in the city; he took a partial course in medicine and practiced some years in connection with the drug business. He was married in January, 1845, to Sarah Kilner, a native of England. Has four children – Albert, Walter, Eddie and Annie. Owns eighty acres adjoining the city corporation; has been a member of the City Council three...

Biography of Job W. Massey

Job W. Massey, farming and stock; P. O. Charleston; the subject of this sketch was born in Cheshire, England, June 28, 1822. He married Miss Sarah Gould Dec. 4, 1847; she was born in North Molton, Devonshire, England, Feb. 23, 1827, and died Aug. 8, 1877. They had six children, viz., William H., now living; Job Francis died at the age of 17, child died in infancy, Nannie now living, George E. died at 18 months of age and Joseph Charles died in his 18th year, from the kick of a horse. He lived in England about six years, when, with his parents, he came to the United States and settled in New Jersey, at Bellville, where his father engaged at his business of contracting machinist, he contracting to furnish machinery for some large calico print works located there; he also took extensive contracts for cotton-mill machinery in Tennessee. In 1835, they moved to Wappinger’s Falls, Dutchess Co., N. Y., where he lived eighteen years, except one year (1844), when he traveled in England with his brother, who was an invalid. His parents died during his residence at the Falls. In 1853, he went to Newburg, and engaged in model making, remaining three years, though part of the time he worked in New York City. In 1856, he and his brother, Henry, came West, looking Mr a location for a general merchandise business. After visiting several points, Dubuque, Iowa, was selected, but owing to the death. of his brother, the business was not opened, and he determined to go into the farming and stock business, and after looking around,...

Biography of Frank L. Travis Hon.

Hon. Frank L. Travis. A resident of Kansas since early boyhood, Frank L. Travis had been a farmer, public official and insurance man at Iola, but his name is most familiarly known over the state at large through his active leadership in the Legislature of Kansas. During the recent session of the Lower House he was the accepted leader of his party, and some of the most beneficial legislation enacted in recent years had been largely shaped and influenced by Mr. Travis of Iola. The ancestry of the Travis family goes back to Ireland. There were men of the name who immigrated to America in colonial days and settled in New York. The first point of settlement was near Delhi in Delaware County. The branch of which Frank L. Travis is a member subsequently removed to Otisville, New York. Mr. Travis’ great-grandfather was Rensselaer Travis, who was born in New York, followed the occupation of farming and hunting, and died at Otisville in that state. The grandfather was Silas L. Travis, whose mother was an own cousin of Gen. Joseph W. Warren, the hero of the Battle of Bunker Hill. Silas L. Travis was born at Otisville, New York, in 1819, for many years was associated with his son Henry F. as a merchant, and finally retired from business and removed to Allen County, Kansas, where he died in 1895. He married Rosanna Hare, who was born at Wigton, Scotland, and died at Iola, Kansas. Frank Lomas Travis was born at Newburgh in Orange County, New York, July 28, 1868. His father was Henry Francis Travis, who was born...

From West Point to Newburgh along the Hudson River

The steamer passes too near the west bank to give a view of the magnificent plateau with parade ground and Government buildings, but on rounding the point a picture of marvelous beauty breaks at once upon the vision. On the left the massive indented ridge of Old Cro’ Nest and Storm King, and on the right Mount Taurus, or Bull Hill, and Break Neck, while still further beyond toward the east sweeps the Fishkill range, sentineled by South Beacon, 1,625 feet in height, from whose summit midnight gleams aroused the countryside for leagues and scores of miles during those seven long years when men toiled and prayed for freedom. Close at hand on the right will be seen Constitution Island, formerly the home of Miss Susan Warner, who died in 1885, author of “Queechy” and the “Wide, Wide World.” Here the ruins of the old fort are seen. The place was once called Martalaer’s Rock Island. A chain was stretched across the river at this point to intercept the passage of boats up the Hudson, but proved ineffectual, like the one at Anthony’s Nose, as the impetus of the boats snapped them both like cords. Some years ago, when the first delegation of Apache Indians was brought to Washington to sign a treaty of peace, the Indians were taken for an “outing” up the Hudson, by General O. O. Howard and Dr. Herman Bendell, Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Arizona. It is said that they noted with cold indifference the palaces along the river front: “the artistic terraces, the well-kept, sloping lawns, the clipped hedges and the ivy-grown walls...
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