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Biography of Charles Mortimer Bingham

Charles Mortimer Bingham, a former well-known merchant of Claremont, Sullivan County, N.H., was born in New London, Conn., February 22, 1804, son of Nathan Bingham. His father settled in Claremont in 1809. He was a hatter by trade, and carried on a large and successful business here. He was a musician, and played the bass-viol in the Episcopal church for years. He died at the age of seventy-eight. He had six children. His daughter Lucretia married Ralph Metcalf, who became the governor of New Hampshire. Her sister Elizabeth married Luther S. Porter, and Maria became the wife of Henry W. Galpin. Silas L., one of the three sons, was a professional voice teacher. He died in Cleveland, Ohio. George, the only surviving member of the family, resides in Minneapolis, Minn. Both Elizabeth and Silas Bingham had remarkable voices. In 1818, at the age of fourteen, Charles Mortimer Bingham began to fit himself for a business career by entering the employ of Josiah Stevens & Sons, dealers in general merchandise, his father, Nathan Bingham, having made an agreement with the firm that, under certain conditions, he should remain with them until twenty-one years of age. We copy, with a few verbal corrections, the following well-told story of his life and character: “A typical New Englander, having completed his term of service with Josiah Stevens, he struck out for himself. He left Claremont with little capital, but with a good deal of honest purpose, and engaged in business in Greenbush, Vt. From thence he went to Chester, where he did a thriving business until 1837, when he was induced by friends...

Biography of Willis G. Weaver

Willis G. Weaver, former clerk of the District Court of Wabaunsee County, had for many years been engaged in the abstract, real estate, loan and insurance business at Alma. He is one of the most widely known men in the county. Mr. Weaver was born at New London, Connecticut, January 7, 1864, but had lived in this part of Kansas since he was a small child. The Weaver family were identified with New England from the earliest period of settlement. It is said that they came out of England and settled in Massachusetts in 1636. Mr. Weaver’s father was the late Dr. Lathrop P. Weaver, the first physician to locate and carry on a regular practice at the Town of Wabaunsee. He was born at Enfield, Connecticut, in 1823, grew up and married there, entered his profession as a physician and surgeon, and during the war he offered his services to Governor Buckingham of Connecticut as a surgeon but was never called out for duty. In April, 1868, he came to Wabaunsee, Kansas, and handled a large practice there until his death in 1874. He also filled the office of postmaster and was a justice of the peace. In politics he was a republican and was an active supporter of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Doctor Weaver married Amy A. Kinne, who was born at Voluntown, Connecticut, in 1827, and died at Wabaunsee, Kansas, March 3, 1872. W. G. Weaver was the fourth of five children. Ellen F. the oldest, died at Manhattan, Kansas, in October, 1913. She was first married in 1870 to A. C. Cutler, a farmer, and...

Biography of Otis T. Dyer

No historical work claiming to he a true record of the growth and prosperity of Riverside for the decade of years preceding 1890, and claiming to record the establishment of many enterprises, industries and incorporations that have been the leading factor in placing her in the ranks of the leading cities and colonies of Southern California, could be considered as anything but glaringly incomplete without a more than passing mention of the gentleman whose name heads this sketch. His association and connection with Riverside’s leading enterprises form an interesting chapter in the annals of the city and county. Mr. Dyer’s life, since Riverside received its first impetus, has been closely interwoven with every important enterprise or movement that tended to benefit the city and add to the welfare and prosperity of the community. The few facts obtained relating to his life and successful career are of interest. He was born in Portage, Genesee County, New York, in 1844. His parents were Leman W. and Philena (Green) Dyer. His father was a native of the Green Mountain State, and was a mechanic, a marble and granite worker by calling. When the subject of this sketch was four years of age his father moved to New London, Connecticut, and it was there where young Dyer received his early education, in the public schools. In the winter of 1857-’58, his father becoming dissatisfied with his success in the East, moved to Illinois, where he located in Stark County. The family were commencing to get settled and accustomed to their new home, and everything progressing in an even tenor, when the father, in...

Biography of William L. Learned

WILLIAM L. LEARNED AN ALBANY jurist whose long and interesting career has reflected no little credit upon himself as well as upon the city of his adoption, is the Hon. William Law Learned, of the supreme court. He was born on the 24th of July, 1821, at New London, Connecticut, and is the son of Ebenezer Learned and Lydia Coit, his second wife. His ancestry is of English origin. His ancestors emigrated to this country at an early day, and settled in Charlestown, Mass. The first admission to the First church of Charlestown was that of his ancestor, William Learned, in 1632. Both his grandfathers, Amasa Learned and Joshua Coit, were men of excellent character, learning and ability in their day; and both of them were members of congress about the beginning of the present century. The father of the present judge was for many years a practicing lawyer, and later in life became a cashier in one of the state banks of Connecticut. He was a man of sound and excellent judgment, and of the purest integrity. At an early age he was graduated from Yale College, and after teaching school for a few years he entered in the practice of his profession at New London. In the pleasant town of New London, William L. Learned spent his earliest years, under the careful and tender instruction of intelligent and loving parents. He early manifested a strong taste for learning, and the highest ambition of his boyhood was to become, like his father, a good lawyer. He first attended the union school at New London, where he enjoyed the...

Pequot Tribe

Pequot Indians (contr. of Paquatauog, ‘destroyers.’- Trumbull). An Algonquian tribe of Connecticut. Before their conquest by the English in 1637 they were the most dreaded of the southern New England tribes. They were originally but one people with the Mohegan, and it is possible that the term Pequot was unknown until applied by the eastern coast Indians to this body of Mohegan invaders, who came down from the interior shortly before the arrival of the English. The division into two distinct tribes seems to have been accomplished by the secession of Uncas, who, in consequence of a dispute with Sassacus, afterward known as the great chief of the Pequot, withdrew into the interior with a small body of followers. This body retained the name of Mohegan, and through the diplomatic management of Uncas acquired such prominence that on the close of the Pequot War their claim to the greater part of the territory formerly subject to Sassacus was recognized by the colonial government. The real territory of the Pequot was a narrow strip of coast in New London County, extending from Niantic River to the Rhode Island boundary, comprising the present towns of New London, Groton, and Stonington. They also extended a few miles into Rhode Island to Wecapaug River until driven out by the Narraganset about 1635. This country had been previously in possession of the Niantic, whom the Pequot invaded from the north and forced from their central position, splitting them into two bodies, thenceforth known as Eastern Niantic and Western Niantic. The Eastern Niantic put themselves under the protection of the Narraganset, while the western branch...

Biographical Sketch of Christopher Avery

Christopher Avery, the founder of this family, was born in England, about 1590, and died in New London, Connecticut, March 12, 1679. There are several traditions as to his place of origin, one that he came from an old Cornish family, another that he was a native of Salisbury, county Wilts. According to one statement, he accompanied Governor Winthrop to Boston, on the “Arbella” in 1630, and a second account says he emigrated with the younger Winthrop, in 1631 and on the voyage formed a close friendship with the latter, which eventually led to his settling in Connecticut. Whether, as has been said, he spent several years at first in Boston is uncertain, but he was in Gloucester about 1644, and was selectman there 1646, 1652 and 1654. He was made freeman at Salem June 29, 1652, and was also clerk of the band, constable, and clerk of the market there. In 1658 be sold his Gloucester land and removed to Boston, where he purchased, March 18, 1658-59 a house and lot. This he sold again a few years later, and followed his son to New London, where he bought property August 8, 1665, and finally settled. His wife, and possibly his children with the exception of his son James, referred to below, did not come to this country, as in 1654, the court passed a resolution relieving him of the fine for not living with...

Biographical Sketch of James Avery

(II) James, son of Christopher Avery. the only child of whom there is any record in America, and the founder of the Averys of Groton, was born in England about 1620. He accompanied his father to the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and lived with him for several years in Gloucester, and then removed to New London, Connecticut, where the first entries in the town book are the births of his three eldest children, who were born in Gloucester. He took up many land grants and built the Hive of the Averys “at the head of Poquonnock Plain in the present town of Groton, about one and one-half miles from the River Thames.” He was a prominent public character, was ensign, lieutenant and captain of the train band, deputy to the general court. Indian commissioner and agent, and townsman from 1660 for twenty years. He married, November 10, 1643, Joanna Greenslade, of Boston. Children : 1. Hannah, born October 12, 1644, married, June 20, 1666, Ephraim Miner. 2. James, born December 16, 1646, died August 22, 1748: married, February 18, 1669, Deborah Stallyou. 3. Mary, born February 19, 1648, died February 2, 1708, married, October 28, 1668, Joseph Miner. 4. Thomas, born May 6, 1651: died January 5, 1737; married, October 22, 1677, Hannah Miner. 5. John, born February 10, 1653-54. married, November 26, 1675, Abigail Cheeseborough. 6. Rebecca, born October 6. 1656, married, August 5, 1678, William Potts. 7. Jonathan, born January 5, 1658, buried September 15, 1681. 8. Christopher, born April 30, 1661, died December 8, 1683. 9. Samuel, referred to...

Biography of Kinney, Asa, Hon.

Kinney, Asa Hon. The parents of Mr. Kinney were Abel and Freelove Kinney, of Cortland County, N Y.; their place of nativity being New London, Conn. They were among the early settlers of Cortland County, N. Y., and the father was a man of influence and prominence. His grandparents were of revolutionary stock, having served their country in the struggle for liberty. Asa Kinney was the fourth son of the family, and was born at Homer, Cortland County, N. Y., May 21, 1810. He received a common school education; was also noted as a debater when a young man. He resided in Homer, N. Y., Preston City, Conn., and Cattaraugus County, N. Y. Previous to coming West, he went to Milwaukee, Wis., in 1836, and settled at Oak Creek on the 5th of July of the same year, where he followed farming. Previous to coming West he had been identified with several town offices, and was promoted Lieutenant Colonel of his regiment in New York. He was one of the first Justices of the Peace in Milwaukee County; was a member of the last Territorial Legislature of Wisconsin, and he was elected as a Representative from Milwaukee County to the Constitutional Convention of 1846, and served on the committee on the organization and affairs of counties and towns, and their powers and duties. He was noted for good, solid sense, but not for speech making. He served in the State Senate in the sessions of 1848 and 1849. In 1852 he went to California and was a member of the Legislature of that State State (sic) Senate in the...

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