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Biography of Samuel Smith Page

Samuel Smith Page, who for more than forty years was one of the most esteemed residents of Hopkinton, was born September 30, 1822, in Dunbarton, N.H. He is a descendant of Benjamin Page, who was born in 1640, in Dedbam, fifty-seven miles north-east of London, England. In 1660, on account of religious differences, Benjamin came to America, locating in Haverhill, Mass., where on September 21, 1666, he married Mary Whittier, who belonged to the family from which the poet, John G. Whittier, sprung. Their son, Jeremiah, the eldest of a family of sixteen, born September 14, 1667, was the next ancestor. He married Deborah Hendrick, of Newburyport, Mass., July 2, 1696; and they reared seven children, Caleb and Joshua. He died in 1752. Caleb Page, the next in line of descent, was born August 16, 1705, and died in 1785. He married in 1728 or 1729 Ruth Wallingford, of Boston, who died in 1738. In 1740 he married a widow Carleton, of Newburyport, who weighed three hundred and fifteen pounds. She, together with a huge arm-chair, now in the possession of the Stark family, had to be carried to meeting on an ox sled. In 1749 Caleb Page removed from Haverhill, Mass., to Atkinson, N.H., where he is said to have owned land measuring one mile in opposite directions from the site of the present academy. In 1751 he sold his lands in Atkinson for his wife’s weight in silver dollars, and located in Dunbarton, this county. The country was then infested with Indians; and his daughter Elizabeth, who later became the wife of General John Stark of Revolutionary...

Biography of John Shackford Kimball

John Shackford Kimball was an enterprising lawyer of Boston and a business man of Burlington, Ia. A son of David and Abigail (Perkins) Kimball, Pembroke, N.H., April 28, 1812. His descent from Michael Kimball, who married Bettie Runnells, came through David Kimball of the second generation and David Kimball of the third, who married Abigail Perkins. The fifth generation is now represented by John Stevens Kimball. Mr. Kimball’s parents died at Pembroke when he was thirteen years old, leaving nine children-Betsey, Asa, Perkins, John Shackford, Abigail, Sarah Towle (widow of Timothy Colby, of Concord ), Joseph, Mary Lewis (widow of Samuel B. Wright, of Burlington, Ia. ), and Harriet. Of these Sarah and Mary are living. Mary, who was about five years old at the death of her parents, subsequently lived in the family made famous at that time by the noted Prescott murder. Perkins, after spending some time in the printing business, was later employed in the Boston custom-house, and then kept a store in partnership with J. Frank Hoyt in Concord. On retiring from business, he returned to Hopkinton, and died there December 15, 1876. He first married Lydia Reed Wilde, of Boston, a sister of Joseph Wilde, of the well-known firm of Lawrence, Wilde & Co., furniture dealers, Cornhill, Boston. His second marriage was made with Savalla Mason, of Grafton, N.H., who survived him with one daughter, Sarah Underwood Kimball. Mother and daughter are now residents of Hopkinton, the latter being the present librarian of the Hopkinton Free Library. When a young man, John Shackford Kimball went to Concord and worked in a bakery. Afterward he...

Biography of Norman A. Deming

Norman A. Deming, a leading farmer of Cornish, Sullivan County, N.H., is a native of the town. He was born July 18, 1824, son of Harvey and Eunice (Ford) Deming. His paternal grandfather, Ebenezer Deming, came to this State from Connecticut. He was a school teacher of great success, and taught for forty-six consecutive winters. Harvey Deming, son of Ebenezer, was born at Cornish, December 6, 1769. He owned a farm of four hundred acres, and carried on farming on an extensive scale, raising a large amount of stock, and producing great quantities of hay and grain. In politics he was a strong Democrat and in religious views a Baptist, and he was one of the Deacons of the church. He died in February, 1835. His wife, whose maiden name was Eunice Ford, bore the following children: John Milton, born October 27, 1799; Judah Solon, born March 10, 1801; Eliza Emily, born February 19, 1803; Harvey Ford, born June 17, 1809; Stephen Bial, born November 3, 1812; Daniel Philander, born May 3, 1816; Eunice Jane, born July 22, 1818; and Norman A., the youngest. John Milton Deming, the eldest son, received his education in the public schools of the town of Cornish. He became a farmer, and married Charlotte Huggins, and had five children, four of whom-Harvey F., John, Emily, and Alvery O. -are living. Judah Solon became an extensive farmer, and for miles around was noted for his piety. He married Matilda Jackson, who bore him four children-M. J. Deming, Elizabeth, Bell, and Susan. Harvey Ford was educated in the town schools, and then became a school teacher....

Biography of John W. Daniels

The public-school system of Boise is a monument to the character and labors of Professor John W. Daniels. There is no nobler profession to which man may devote his energies than that of the teacher. What man prominent in public life does not attribute his success in a considerable measure to the influence of some teacher whose instruction he enjoyed in youth? The thoughts implanted in the young minds grow and develop, and largely shape the destinies of those by whom they have been received. It is therefore of the utmost importance that the training of the young shall be entrusted to those who have a just appreciation of the responsibilities that rest upon them, who realize the value of physical, mental and moral development, who can instruct the children how best to use their powers, and, while promoting intellectual activity, neglect not to sow the seeds of character that will produce high ideals of manhood and womanhood. Such is the mission of the teacher, and such has been the life work of John W. Daniels. Professor Daniels was born in England, on the 1st of January, 1846, and when five years of age was brought to America by his parents, Thomas and Margaret (Sullivan) Daniels, who crossed the Atlantic with their five children, and located near Boston, Massachusetts. The father had learned the dyer’s trade in England and had become very proficient in that line of work, which he successfully followed during his residence in this country. He departed this life in the sixty-third year of his age, his wife having died ten years previously. Their son, John...

Biography of Dr. Clark W. Sylvester

Dr. Clark W. Sylvester, one of Riverside’s wealthy and most esteemed citizens, was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, in 1850, son of Sewell and Mary J. (Foster) Sylvester, both natives of Maine. The father was an iron founder by trade, and although a hard-working man, with nothing but his daily labor to depend upon for the maintenance of his family, he was possessed with the innate sense of honor and the principles of a gentleman. He toiled assiduously and took upon himself liabilities to give a good education to his son, who, during vacations, worked respectively in a grocery, paint shop, machine shop and iron foundry, and even during his terms of study often supported himself by such work as he could find to do during spare hours. His college course he never quite finished, for at the age of twenty-one he became imbued with the conviction that the expenses attendant upon his course of studies and his graduation was more than his father, whose health had recently suffered, could bear, and that his father, in reality, was more in need of assistance than able to give it. Dr. Sylvester being a youth of studious habits and of an ambitious disposition, mastered the leading branches of study in the high schools of North and South Andover, Massachusetts, then entered the Maine State Academy, in Lewiston, Maine, after which he passed through, a course of study in the Nichols Latin School and Lewiston, Maine, and then graduated from the New Hampton Institute, New Hampton, New Hampshire, and prepared himself for Dartmouth College, but being unable to carry out this design he...

Biographical Sketch of Timothy Earle Hopkins

The grandparents of Mr. Hopkins were Timothy Hopkins, born in 1751, and Sarah Carver, daughter of Captain Joseph Carver. His father was Carver Hopkins, born October 26th, 1799, who married Abby K. Manchester. Their children, seven in number, were: Israel M., Florinda A., Sarah C., Abby E., Ann E., Timothy E. and Lillian P., of whom all but the eldest son are still living. Timothy Earle Hopkins was born in Burrillville, R. I., December 5th, 1835, of which place he continued a resident until 1562: His education was received in the public schools and at New Hampton, N. H., where a year was spent in study, after which he served an apprenticeship as a spindle maker in his native town. He then engaged for two years in mercantile business, and at the expiration of this time removed to Providence, where three years were spent as a merchant. In 1865 Mr. Hopkins removed to Thompson and embarked in the manufacture of cotton goods, remaining at this point until 1870, when Burrillville again became his home. Here he continued the business of a manufacturer, the product of his mills being woolen fabrics. In 1876 he suffered disaster and loss as a consequence of the severe flood of that year, and soon after removed to Fitchburg, Mass., where until 1880 he continued the manufacture of woolens. Mr. Hopkins then became a: resident of Danielsonville, his present home, where he is still engaged in the production of woolen goods in the town of Killingly. He is also treasurer of the Jesse Eddy Manufacturing Company, of Fall River, Mass., and one of the promoters...

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