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Biography of William Mann

William Mann was born in Hancock, Washington county, Maryland, April 1, 1839. He is the son of Jonathan E. and Mary A. Mann, who came to Missouri in 1841 and settled at Gallatin, where the subject of this sketch was reared. His educational advantages were limited, only having the opportunity of attending school two or three months each year from the time he was eight until fifteen years of age. His mother died when he was nine, and his father just before he became of age. His father being a merchant, young Mann started for himself in the same calling, he and his brother, Elwood E., and Jonathan Brosins, forming the firm of Brosins, Mann & Co., in 1860, soon after his father’s death. They engaged in business until the disturbed condition of the county, caused by the war, compelled them to discontinue, which they did in 1863. Our subject then went to Nebraska City and engaged in the stove and tinware business, which he carried on until 1867, when, peace being restored, he sold out and returned to Gallatin, and in 1868 again engaged in the mercantile business, associating with him Thomas J. Crain as Mann & Crain. They dissolved in 1870, and in 1871 he became connected in the mercantile business with another brother, J. A. Mann, under the firm name of Mann & Brother. His brother retiring from the firm in 1873, John D. Coulson became his successor, changing the firm to Mann & Coulson, and under this name they continued until 1877, when Mr. Coulson retired; Mr. Mann remained only a year longer, when he...

Biography of Thomas J. Crain

Thomas J. Crain was born near the Ohio river, in Fleming county, Kentucky, September 4, 1830. He was reared and educated in his native place, and continued to reside there until 1855, when he migrated to Missouri and entered land in Holt county, improving the same and living upon it until 1864, in February of which year he rented his farm and went to Nebraska City, Nebraska. Here he was engaged in freighting to Denver, Colorado, for one year, when he opened a feeding stable, and carried on that business until the spring of 1866, then went to Hamburg, Iowa, and engaged in stock-feeding for one year. Returning to Gallatin in the spring of 1867, he engaged in the mercantile business with William Mann, under the name and style of Mann &. Crain, and transacted business until the fall of 1869, when they dissolved partnership and closed out business. He next engaged in the lumber trade, being the pioneer lumber dealer of Gallatin, and there being no railroad at that time, he had the lumber hauled by team from Hamilton, in Caldwell county. In 1871 he retired from the lumber trade and engaged in the grocery business with S. T. Hill, under the firm name of Hill & Crain, until 1875. We find him buying and shipping walnut lumber to Chicago in 1878, and he continued to buy and ship until 1880, when he entered into partnership with A. F. Barnett, forming the present firm of Crain & Barnett, lumber dealers. Mr. Crain was married to Miss Amanda M. Plumer, of Fleming county, Kentucky, on the 25th of January,...

Biography of Edward P. Ray

Edward P. Ray. Fortunate is the man who finds his work in the world early in life and concentrates all his energies upon discharging his duties and responsibilities with credit and efficiency. One of this fortunate class was Edward P. Ray of Arkansas City. His father and grandfather before him were in the produce business, established one of the early concerns of that kind in Southern Michigan, and the old house is still flourishing and doing a large business at Coldwater, Michigan, today. Edward P. Ray grew up in that business atmosphere and after breaking home ties and family associations he readily found places of responsibility with other concerns. In the course of his career he came out to Kansas, and for a number of years was manager of the A. S. Kininmonth Company, a produce concern whose activities are practically state wide in Kansas. Mr. Ray was born at Coldwater, Michigan, December 1, 1875, and came of old American Colonial stock. His paternal ancestors settled in New York in the early days. His grandfather, Henry Ray, was born at Oaks Corners in Ontario County, New York, in 1823. For a number of years he was a grocer at Phelps, New York, and organized the produce business which his son, E. F. Ray, still conducts. Henry Ray died at Coldwater, Michigan, in 1885. He came to voting age when the whigs were still a powerful organization, and from that party affiliation he gravitated into the ranks of the republicans. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and at one time served as a member of the New...

Biography of Jacob Jones

Jacob Jones, a pioneer property-owner, merchant, farmer, blacksmith and hotelkeeper at Montpelier, Idaho, and one of the most prominent citizens of the town, was born in Breconshire, South Wales, May 14, 1825. His parents were descended from old Welsh families and his father was a Methodist, and his mother was a Presbyterian. Of their ten children he was the youngest. He was educated and entered upon the active struggle of life in his native land and there married Miss Anne Collier on the Saturday before Christmas, 1852. As early as 1846 he had been converted to the faith of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and he had done much missionary work in its behalf, as a result of which many hundreds have embraced the faith. His wife had also been for some years a convert. In the spring of 1853 only a few months after their marriage, they set out for the United States, on board the sailing ship International, from Liverpool. There were six hundred passengers, and the voyage consumed eight weeks, at the end of which time they very gladly disembarked at New Orleans, Louisiana. Mr. Jones and his brother, Henry, went to Fillmore, Missouri, where the brothers engaged for a time in contracting and building. From there Mr. Jones went with his family to Nebraska City, Nebraska, where they lived eight years. In the spring of 1863 they removed to Salt Lake City, Utah, where Mr. Jones opened a blacksmith shop, having mastered the trade in Wales and being thoroughly familiar with the work in all its details. At that time the...

Biographical Sketch of Clarence Alexander Ambrister

Clarence Alexander Ambrister, engaged in the general practice of civil law at Muskogee, was born in Nebraska City, Nebraska, on the 10th of February, 1888, and is a son of Samuel Alexander and Sallie (Gillispie) Ambrister. The father was engaged in the operation of a cottonseed oil mill. The son was accorded liberal educational advantages, which he pursued at Norman, Oklahoma, following the removal of the family to this state. He supplemented his early training with a university course. He became a resident of Norman in 1892 and through the intervening period has resided in this state, where he has made for himself a creditable position in legal circles. In preparation for a professional career he matriculated in the law department of the University of Missouri, from which he was graduated in December, 1909. He then opened an office in Muskogee, where he has remained, giving his attention to general civil practice. His clientage has steadily increased in volume and importance throughout the intervening period and he has been connected with much of the leading litigations heard in the courts of the district as the years have passed. He belongs to the Oklahoma State and to the American Bar Associations. On the 11th of May, 1918, Mr. Ambrister was married to Miss Carrie Walton of Muskogee, and they have become the parents of a daughter, Caroline Walton. Fraternally Mr. Ambrister is a Mason and an Elk. In the former organization he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and is also a member of the Mystic Shrine. His life has ever conformed to the teachings and high...

Johnson, Mae – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Mae Johnson died at her home at Rt. 1, Box 37, Enterprise on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 1980, at the age of 83. She had been a resident of Wallowa County since 1941. Born in Nebraska City, Neb., on April 6, 1896, she was the daughter of Henry and Maryanne Seymour. On August 25, 1936, she was married to Charles J. Johnson in Reno, Nev. He preceded her in death on Oct. 3, 1964. A Rosary was said for Mrs. Johnson at 7 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 17, in the Bollman Chapel. A mass of Christian Burial was offered by Rev. Leo Weckerle at 10 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 18, in St. Katherine’s Catholic Church, Enterprise. Dorothy Gilbert was organist. Bearers were Larry McFetridge, Darrel McFetridge, Tim Sasser, Randy Anderson, Don Stein and C.G. McCormack. Internment was in the Enterprise Catholic Cemetery. Bollman Funeral Home was in charge of all arrangements. Survivors include numerous nieces and nephews. Those who wish may contribute to St. Katherine’s Catholic Church in her memory. Source: Wallowa County Chieftain, February 21, 1980, Page 2 Contributed by: Sue...

Biography of Colonel S. M. Barrett

Colonel S. M. Barrett, commandant of the Oklahoma Military Academy at Claremore and an author of note, is one of the most prominent men in northeastern Oklahoma. He is a native of Nebraska, his birth having occurred in Nebraska City on the 3rd day of March, 1865, a son of Robert W. Barrett, his father being an old plainsman. S. M. Barrett spent his early life in Nebraska but in youth he removed with his parents to Jackson County, Missouri, (near Kansas City) and at the age of twenty-one years went to Tulare County, California, where he became a freighter and bronco buster. He became an excellent shot and has perhaps never been so proud as on the occasion of shooting his first mountain lion, that kill being made in the Yosemite grant. His prowess as an expert gunman stood him in need at various times. Upon the entrance of the United States into the World war, Colonel Barrett was most anxious to get into active service, but because of his age and physical condition he was not admitted as a combatant. However, he was made special agent of the army for training drafted men. That was a sore disappointment to him, but like a true soldier he was determined to do the best he could for his country and he set about his work with a nerve and energy that won the respect of all under his command. Since 1919 he has been commandant of the Oklahoma Military Academy in Claremore and this institution is, indeed, fortunate in securing him for its head. The Oklahoma Military Academy is...

Wilkinson, Lydia – Obituary

Lydia Wilkinson, wife of Thomas Wilkinson, of High Valley, died Sunday night last of diabetes, and the fruneral took place at noon Tuesday, with services at the cemetery in Union. Mrs. Wilkinson was 56 years, 11 months and 26 days of age, and had been in a feeble state of health for some time. Lydia Rundall was born near Nebraska City, Neb., January 17, 1861. At the time of her death she was 56 years, 11 months and 26 days of age. Her early childhood was spent in the States of Nebraska, Iowa and Kansas. In 1876 she crossed the plains, coming to Kelton by train, then by team into the Grande Ronde Valley. In 1876 she was united in marriage to Thomas Wilkinson, who, at the age of 81, survives her, having been a pioneer settler of 1864. They resided in High Valley until her death. To this union was born four children-Matilda, Mary, Jacob and Edgar, all being with her at her death. Passing through the hardships of pioneer life only brightened her disposition. She was always found with those in sickness or sorrow, ministering to others needs with loving hands that will be missed not only by the family, but by all who knew her. Five sisters and two brothers survive her-Georgia Campbell, Emma Fisher, Minnie Buford, Grace Wilkinson, Hettie Bently and two brothers, John and Jas. Rundall. Later-Funeral services at the Union cemetery Tuesday p.m. were conducted by Rev S. E. Eels, pastor of the Presbyterian church. “Death of Lydia Wilkinson” Printed January 13, 1918 Obituaries and Other Vital Records of Union County, Oregon. 1890-1930....

Frederick P. Todd of Jamestown NY

Frederick P. Todd7, (Thomas Jefferson6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born June 24, 1837, in Thompson, Geauge County, Ohio, married, May 30, 1865, Mary A., daughter of George B. Ford, who was born Oct. 13, 1844. In early life he went to Nebraska with his parents in the year 1857, where he remained until 1860, when he went to De Wittville, N. Y., where he attended school during the winter of 1860-61, then he attended the spring and fall terms at the Westfield (N. Y.) Academy in the year of 1861. In the winter of 1861-62, he taught school on Chautauqua Hill. In the spring of 1862 he returned to Plattsmouth, Neb., where he studied law with Hon. T. M. Marquette the following summer. The next winter he taught school in Mills County, Iowa, and the summer of 1863, he was employed in the office of the County Treasurer of Cass County, Iowa. Thence in the fall he went to Jamestown, N. Y., and obtained work in A. M. Harrington’s Dry Goods store where he remained until 1866, when in June he returned to Plattsmouth, Neb., and during the following winter he taught school in the Stocking District in Cass County, Neb. From 1867 to 1874 he lived in Plattsmouth and Nebraska City, Neb., engaged in Merchantile and Sewing Machine business. In the fall of 1874, he returned to Jamestown, N. Y., where he has since resided having been engaged in the Dry Good’s business until about Jan. 1, 1880, when he became interested in the Insurance and Real Estate business. From 1880-84, he was Clerk of the town...

Biography of James H. Raley

JAMES H. RALEY. – Prominent among the pioneers of Eastern Oregon may be mentioned this gentleman whose name and portrait appear here with, and who now sits as joint senator in the Oregon legislature from Umatilla and Morrow counties. He was born in Nebraska City in 1855, and as a boy, in 1862, crossed the plains with his parents, arriving at Portland at a time so early in the history of that metropolis as to find an excellent spot for camping near the present site of the St. Charles Hotel. A year later the family found a location at Vancouver, but in 1864 selected the grassy, virgin hills of the Umatilla as their permanent home, thus antedating Pendleton, and even the organization of the county. James gave early attention to books, and occupied himself in teaching, and during vacations went on freighting expeditions to Idaho. He completed his education at the State University, and in 1877 became one of the early builders of Pendleton by removing to the then little village and opening out a drug business, operating under the firm name of Raley & Scott until 1880. To build or rather to protect a town in those days not only required much faith and enterprise, but even actual fighting. It was in 1878 that the Bannacks, whose numbers were augmented to nearly one thousand by renegades from several reservations, came sweeping through the country, and threatened the town with destruction. The alarm brought in July 5th by Foster, of La Grande, met with a prompt response from the citizens of Pendleton. Foster reported that two others, Coggin and...

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