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Biographical Sketch of H. C. Tuchsen

It is probably true that the real estate operator has the opportunity as well as the responsibility of doing more actual good ‘for the county that he represents than any other profession. He brings settlers and home seekers and builds up the county in more ways than one. This is particularly true of Mr. Tuchsen whose election to serve as President of the Redwood City Board of Trade and San Mateo County Development Association as well as City Trustee of Redwood City, amply testifies. Mr. Tuchsen was born on February 11, 1864 in Germany. He came to America when comparatively a young man and has resided in California the last thirty-four years. Twenty-one of these years were spent in San Mateo County. Before settling in this county he tried successively San Luis Obispo, Monterey and Alameda Counties, but found none so much to his taste as the county of his choice. On March 31, 1897 he was married at Redwood City where his home is now located. There are two children to this union: Elena and Valentine. Mr. Tuchsen entered the real estate business in Redwood City and San Mateo County at a comparatively early period and participated in the substantial profits accruing therefrom to almost all who had the foresight to see the opportunities in this field of activity. He enjoys a most enviable reputation as an appraiser of real estate values and his opinion hats been accepted in difficult cases by the leading men in banks of San...

Biography of P. H. McEvoy

P. H. McEvoy, the subject of this sketch was born May, 9, 1848, in Sidney, Australia. He left Australia with his parents in 1849, for San Francisco, by way of Honolulu. After leaving Honolulu the vessel met with such adverse winds and weather, that it was six months before land was sighted at Monterey, California. This long voyage had depleted the stores of provisions and water to such an extent that for two weeks prior to sighting land, everyone on shipboard was put on an allowance of both food and water, passengers receiving such small rations that when land was sighted they compelled the captain to land them at Monterey, rather than take any further chances of landing at San Francisco. After a residence in Monterey of less than three years, he moved with his parents in March, 1852, to the Carey Jones ranch, south and west of what is now Redwood City, and now known as the Hawes ranch, which was at this time part of San Francisco county, San Mateo county being organized in April, 1856. He attended the first school in San Mateo county, which was located on the extreme corner of what is known as Redwood Highlands, continuing until 1863 when he entered what is now known as St. Mary’s College, on Mission Hill, San Francisco. At the age of eighteen we find him farming 320 acres on the Woodside Road near his parents’ home. He continued farming and contracting until 1914 when he retired to private life. Mr. McEvoy was naturalized in the 12th district court in August, 1869. He has been a life-long...

Biography of Loren Coburn

Although a resident of Pescadero, the active years of Mr. Coburn’s life have been spent in the mining regions of California and the growing cities of Oakland and San Francisco. Loren Coburn was born in Berlin, Orange County, Vermont, January 11, 1826, with New England blood, a promise of future success. When ten years of age, his home was changed to Massachusetts, where he remained until he started for California in 1851. He shipped from New York on the steamer Falcon, bound for Cuba. After passing over the Isthmus of Panama he took passage on the ship Panama, arriving in San Francisco on June 1, 1851. From there he went to the northern mines, by way of Sacramento, Greenwood valleys, and remained four months at the placers, on the middle fork of the American River. On returning to San Francisco, laden with the fruits of his successful mining experience, he was induced to enter a business life. He engaged in the livery business in Oakland where he remained four years, after which he disposed of his stable and bought another in San Francisco, continuing in active business for twelve years. While still in the city, Mr. Coburn purchased the Punto del Ano Nuevo Rancho, a Spanish Grant of four leagues. After the sale of his San Francisco business he leased his ranch to the Steele Brothers, and in 1866 took his long deferred trip back to the land of his birth. Returning in 1868, he spent the next four years in San Francisco and at the expiration of the Steele Brothers lease in 1872, he removed to Pigeon Point...

Biography of Warren P. Hunt

Warren Palmerton Hunt, who has been a highly respected citizen of Lewiston since 1862, and is numbered among the California pioneers of 1854, was born in Erie County, New York, March 13, 1832, a son of Isaac and Diantha (Allbee) Hunt, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of the Empire state. In 1852 the father went by way of the Cape Horn route to California, but returned to his farm in Erie County, where he made his home until his death, which occurred in the eighty-sixth year of his age. His wife passed away in her eighty-second year, and both died on the old family homestead in New York, where they had spent the greater part of their lives. They were honest, industrious farming people, highly respected by all. They held membership in the Christian church, and Mr. Hunt gave his political support to the Republican party. Warren P. Hunt was the eldest in their family of three children, and was reared upon the old homestead, attending the public schools through the winter months, while in the summer he assisted in the labors of field and meadow. In 1854 he sailed from New York for San Francisco, reaching the latter place after a month’s voyage. He then went directly to the mines in Sonora, Tuolumne County, California, and engaged in mining for about six years, meeting with only moderate success. While on the Stanislaus river with three partners, an incident occurred which terminated fatally to two of his partners, and Mr. Hunt and the other partner narrowly escaped with their lives. In the river they had...

Biography of Job Francis Dye

Among the figures who stand prominently forth on the pages of western history is the gentleman whose name introduces this review. His was a marvelous record of long connection with the events which go to make up the annals of the Pacific coast. He was one of those honored pioneers who blazed a path for future cavalcades to follow; who bravely turned their faces from the cities of the east, with all the advantages of wealth and civilization, and cast their fortunes with the western frontier, in all its wildness and primitive modes of life; who, rather than enjoy the comforts of their former homes, chose to endure the hardships of a wider and freer country; and who made out of those very obstacles, which, to a weaker class of men would have been stumbling blocks, the stepping stones to wealth and renown, none of these great men are more noted for untiring perseverance and steady progress which have resulted in the acquirement of wealth and the well merited esteem of their fellow men than the gentleman whose name heads this memoir. He realized with great prophetic foresight the magnitude of the prospects of the west, and that at a time when this section of the country gave but slight signs of her future greatness. If, as is maintained, the history of a country is best told in the lives of her prominent men, then certainly any history of Idaho or the Pacific coast would be incomplete without recognition of the salient points of the life record of this man, who was for many years a most influential and...

Rountree, Letha A. – Obituary

Leatha A. Rountree, Salinas resident Leatha A. Rountree of Salinas died Wednesday at Dominican Hospital in Santa Cruz following a brief illness. She was 80. A native of Oregon, Mrs. Rountree lived in Salinas since 1964. Mrs. Rountree is survived by her husband, George T. Rountree of Salinas; her son, Richard Parr of Henderson, Nev.; two grandchildren and one great-grandchild. At her request, no services will be held. A private burial will take place at a later date. Memorials may be made to the American Heart Association, 76 Stephanie Drive, Salinas, Calif. 93901. Arrangements are under the direction of Norman’s Family Chapel. Contributed by: Margaret...

Montgomery, James M. – Obituary

Following a brief illness J. M. Montgomery, one of Kittitas Valley’s oldest residents died at the Ellensburg General Hospital Friday afternoon [October 29, 1937]. Mr. Montgomery was born at Scio, Linn County, Oregon, June 30, 1852. Until 1881 he lived with his family in Salinas, Calif., when he moved to Kittitas County where he lived the remainder of his 56 years. Besides owning a farm in the Broadview District where he has made a home since 1881 he operated a freighting line from various supply points until the railroad was built into this section in 1886. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Louisa McCumber Montgomery; a stepdaughter, Mrs. David Bowles; a grandson, Lonnie Rasmussen; a sister, Mrs. Annie Wheeler, and a number of nieces and nephews. Rev. F. L. Pedersen of the Methodist Episcopal Church conducted the funeral services held at 2 o’clock from the Honeycutt Chapel. Burial was in the IOOF Cemetery. Contributed by: Shelli...

Montgomery, George – Obituary

George Montgomery, valley pioneer, passed away yesterday [April 29, 1934] at his home, 712 East 8th Street following a short illness. He was born in Jackson County, Oregon, Sept. 29, 1860, and came to the Kittitas Valley at the age of 21 from Salina, Calif. He was married to Deliah Davis, Feb. 14, 1890. Mr. Montgomery worked as early pioneers did and driving freight in from The Dalles, Oregon, and suffered many hardships. He has been gardener at the Normal School for 14 years where he was affectionately known as “dad.” He leaves a widow and two sons, Carl of Seattle and Frank of Ellensburg. Two brothers, James of Ellensburg and Ralph of McDermott, Nev., and one sister, Mrs. Geo. Wheeler of Ellensburg, survive. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m., Wednesday, at the Honeycutt Chapel. Burial will be in the IOOF Cemetery. Contributed by: Shelli...

Boesch, Ferdinand – Obituary

Muddy Creek, Baker County, Oregon Ferdinand Boesch, 103, of Haines, died Oct. 18, 2005, at Settlers Park in Baker City. His funeral will be Saturday at 10 a.m. at Gray’s West & Co. Pioneer Chapel, 1500 Dewey Ave. Pastor Robin Harris of the Cornerstone Baptist Church in North Powder will officiate. Visitations will be Friday from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Gray’s West & Co. Vault interment will be at Haines Cemetery. Ferdinand was born April 23, 1902, in West New York, N.J., to Frdiolinus “Fred” and Anna Wichser Boesch. The family left New Jersey when Ferdinand was three months old, residing in Salinas, Calif. They moved to Baker County in 1912 and lived in the Lone Pine district near Hunt Mountain. Ferdinand farmed in the Muddy Creek community for many years. He enjoyed photography, music, hunting and fishing. He was the first bow hunter in Baker County. He married Bertha Warfield of Haines in 1932. The couple had four children, Anna Belle, Bonnie Lee, Donald Glen and Dora Mae. Bonnie died in 1979. Bertha died in 1998. Survivors are Anna Belle Boesch of Beaverton, Donald Glen of Pendleton and Dora M. Gourley of Durham; grandchildren, Brenda Deskin of Tualatin, Melissa Paradis, Melinda Dickson, and Michele Cason, all of Texas, Jeff Boesch of Hermiston, Jerry Boesch of Walla Walla, Wash., and Janell Leake of Helix; 11 great-grandchildren; and two great-great grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made to the Foundation Fighting Blindness or to the American Heart Association through Gray’s West & Co., P.O. Box 726, Baker City, OR 97814. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City,...
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