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Native American History of Monroe County, Georgia

Monroe County is located in central Georgia and is part of the Macon, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA.) It is named after President James Monroe of Virginia (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831.) Its county seat is Forsyth. Monroe County for several years became tourist destination after the popular movie, “Fried Green Tomatoes,” was filmed at the village of Juliette in 1991. Monroe County is bounded on the north by Butts County and the northeast by Jasper County. Jones County is located to the east, while Bibb County forms its southeastern boundary. Crawford County forms a section of its southern boundary, while Upson County adjoins a short section on the west-southwest. Lamar County is located to the west of Monroe. Geology and hydrology Monroe County is located in the Lower Piedmont geological region. The county contains two faults, the Towaliga and the Goat Rock, which apparently are inactive, although some minor tremors do occasionally occur in the region. The northern edge of the county contains several mineral springs, which were frequent camping locations by Native Americans. The Lower Piedmont is characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The terrain consists of rolling hills and, stream valleys. Seasonal or permanent wetlands parallel many of its streams. These are relatively narrow bands of soggy terrain that provide ecological diversity for animal and plant life. The top soils are thin over most hills and steep slopes, while much deeper near streams. Short-sighted cultivation techniques in the 19th and early 20th century caused much of the best top soil to be eroded; thus exposing red clay sub-soil. Sandy...

Slave Narrative of George Eason

Interviewer: Edwin Driskell Person Interviewed: George Eason Location: Georgia Mr. George Eason was born in Forsyth, Ga., on the plantation of Mr. Jack Ormond. In addition to himself there were six other children, one of whom was his twin brother. He and his brother were the oldest members of this group of children. His mother, who was the master’s cook, had always belonged to the Ormond family while his father belonged to another family, having been sold while he (George) was still a baby. It so happened that Mr. Ormond was a wealthy planter and in addition to the plantation that he owned in the country, he also maintained a large mansion in the town. The first few years of his life were spent in town where he helped his mother in the kitchen by attending to the fire, getting water, etc. He was also required to look after the master’s horse. Unlike most other slave owners who allowed their house servants to sleep in the mansion, Mr. Ormond had several cabins built a short distance in the rear of his house to accommodate those who were employed in the house. This house group consisted of the cook, seamstress, maid, butler, and the wash woman. Mr. Eason and those persons who held the above positions always had good food because they got practically the same thing that was served to the master and his family. They all had good clothing—the women’s dresses being made of calico, and the butler’s suits of good grade cloth, the particular kind of which Mr. Eason knows nothing about. He himself wore a one-piece...

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