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Biography of William C. Gillihan

William C. Gillihan was born near McComb, McDonough county, Illinois, April 1, 1841. When he had reached the age of four years his parents removed to Arkansas, and settled near Crawfordsville, Crawford county, and there his father died after a two years residence. In 1847 his mother removed to Iowa, and after several changes, finally settled in Warren county, near Indianola, where they lived until 1855, when (his mother having become Mrs. M. R. Richardson) they removed to Daviess county, seven miles south of Gallatin, and here he lived until 1858. He then left home and began the struggle of life for himself, and obtained most of his education after that date, attending the common schools of Daviess county in 1858 and 1859, and the high school at Gallatin in 1860 and 1661. In February, 1862, he joined the Federal army, enlisting in Company A, First Regiment, Volunteer Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, and served three years, participating in the battles and skirmishes in which his command en: gaged, the most severe being the battles of Independence, Boonville, Mine Creek, Jefferson City and Big Blue, during Price’s last raid through Missouri in 1864. Receiving his honorable discharge from the service he re-turned to Gallatin, arriving February 11, 1865. He entered the office of Judge Samuel A. Richardson and began the study of law, and was admitted to the bar in 1867. He began practice in Gallatin, and in 1868, entered into. partnership with D. L. Kost, under the firm name of Gillihan & Kost, and they continued to practice until 1870, when Mr. Kost retired, and the pres=ent firm of...

Biography of Benjamin C. Bond, Hon.

Hon. Benjamin C. Bond. In the public service that frequently crowns the career of men of personal high standing in a community, very often is shown a great capacity for public usefulness that the opportunity presents. In electing Benjamin C. Bond, an honored citizen of Buffalo, Kansas, cashier of the State Bank of Buffalo, to the State Legislature, the people of Wilson County gave evidence of wise discrimination and intelligent judgment. Not only is Mr. Bond an exact business man, with those habits of mind that assure investigation and accurate decision concerning the important measures brought before the legislative assembly, but he is also a man whose life had ever been marked with unselfish devotion to duty and to fearless championship of causes he had believed to be just. Benjamin C. Bond was born April 21, 1878, at Mount Sterling, in Brown County, Illinois. His parents were John A. and Parthenia (Bush) Bond. One of the very earliest settlers in Brown County, Illinois, was Rev. Granville Bond, a Methodist preacher, a faithful pioneer in the cause of religion. He was the founder of the family at Mount Sterling and was the great-grandfather of Hon. Benjamin C. Bond, of Buffalo, Kansas. His son, Benjamin Bond, was born in the circuit rider’s cabin at Mount Sterling which he built after emigrating from Kentucky, and Benjamin became a farmer and doubtless was prosperous on the rich soil of Illinois, until the outbreak of Civil war led him to join with his loyal neighbors, in the effort to preserve the Union. He died in the army during the progress of the war. John...

Biography of Col. William Williams Chapman

COL. W.W. CHAPMAN. – It has frequently been remarked, that while many men of great fame, and a deservedly wide reputation, cannot lay their finger upon a single public act that they originated, others whose names are less known can county by the score the progeny of their brains, now alive and active in the affairs of the world. Of the latter class is Colonel Chapman of Oregon. There are few men in America, even among those esteemed great, who have originated and carried to completion a greater number of particular acts of large scope and general beneficence. Many whose names appear constantly in current literature can point to no policy or institutions established by themselves, while he has been the projector or formulator of measures which have become established from the Atlantic to the Pacific, having launched them in complete form upon the sea of political or judicial activities. This is a broad statement, but is fully borne out by an investigation of the facts. The Colonel is a man who works unostentatiously, relies little upon public enthusiasm, and never resorts to the noisy methods of the demagogue. He prefers to bring together forces already in operation, and to change their current not so much by agitation, or even by persuasion of public men, as by the inevitable movement of human tendencies. On account of this manner of working, what he performs may be accomplished before the public know anything of it; and his name may scarcely appear. While thus deep, it scarcely need be said of him that he has never reached his ends by the improper...

Biography of Col. W.W. Chapman

Among men now living there are none around whom clusters so much of the history of Portland as the one whose name heads this memoir. He is the strongest link between the infant days and the stalwart manhood of our city. But the results of his labors in behalf of Portland, great and far-reaching as they have been in good, by no means complete the record of his long and useful life. Years before American civilization had gained a foot-hold in this portion of the Pacific Northwest, he had borne a leading part in laying the foundations of the State of Iowa, projecting and formulating measures which have since become established to the western limits of the continent. As one of the earlier pioneers of Oregon he found a new arena for his powers, and here for nearly a half a century he has exerted an influence upon political and business forces eminently beneficial, while his whole public career has been singularly free from personal or selfish motives. A hard fighter in everything, a man of direct methods and perfect integrity, he has maintained his opinions fearlessly, honestly and sincerely. No one can read the story of his public endeavors without feeling his heart warm toward this venerable man of over four score years, who upon many occasions in days gone by, when others were timorous or doubtful, dared to stand alone, and with admirable courage, and at times with seeming obstinacy, to do valiant service for the city and State of his adoption. Preceding pages of this volume treat so largely of Col. Chapman’s part in the progress...

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