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Houses of the Waco Tribe

On August 23, 1853, the expedition under command of Lieut. A. W. Whipple camped at, some point in the southwestern portion of the present McClain County, Oklahoma, and that evening were visited by two Indians, ” the one tall and straight, the other ill looking. Their dress consisted of a blue cotton blanket wrapped around the waist, a head-dress of eagles’ feathers, brass wire bracelets, and moccasins. The outer cartilages of their ears were cut through in various places, and short sticks inserted in place of rings. They were painted with vermilion, and carried bows of bois d’art three feet long, and cow-skin quivers filled with arrows. The latter were about twenty-six inches in length, with very sharp steel heads, tastefully and skillfully made. The feathers with which they were tipped, and the sinews which bound them, were prettily tinted with red, blue, and green. The shafts were colored red, and said to be poisoned.”1 Unable to converse with the two strangers, the interpreter proceeded to interview them by signs. The graceful motions of the hands seemed to convey ideas faster than words could have done, and with the whole operation we were highly amused and interested. Our visitors now said that they were not Kichais, but Huecos, and that they were upon a hunting expedition.” Referring to the same two Indians another member of the expedition wrote: “The newcomers belonged to the tribe of Wakos, or Waekos, neighbors of the Witchita Indians, who live to the east of the Witchita Mountains, in a village situated on the bank of a small river rising in that direction. They were...

Biography of William C. Kandt

William C. Kandt, a native of Kansas, and member of a pioneer family in the state, has been a banker all his active career, and while he maintains offices and has his home at Independence he is active cashier of the Wayside State Bank and president of the Citizens State Bank of Elk City. His birth occurred in Dickinson County, Kansas, August 24, 1877. His grandparents, John and Mary Kandt were German people who came to this country in the early ’50s and in 1857 pioneered into Dickinson County, Kansas, where they were among the first to break the virgin soil and where they lived as farmers the rest of their lives. A. F. Kandt, father of the Independence banker, was born in Germany in 1850 and was brought to this country when three years of age. His parents first lived in Wisconsin, and he was about seven when he came to Kansas. Reared and educated in Dickinson County, he has followed an active career as a farmer and stock raiser, but since 1906 has lived retired at Herington, in Dickinson County. He is a democrat and has filled various township offices, including the office of treasurer. He is a member and deacon of the German Lutheran Church. A. F. Kandt married Fannie Kux, who was born in Austria in 1852. Her father, Ignitz Kux, brought his family to America when she was very young, settling in Chicago and afterwards becoming an early farmer in Marion County, Kansas. A. F. Kandt and wife were married in Dickinson County, and their children were: William C.; Ida, wife of W. F....

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