Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Noyes B. Holbrook

Mr. Holbrook dates his residence in Idaho from 1862, and is therefore one of its pioneer settlers. He has witnessed almost the entire growth and development of the state, and has largely aided in its progress and advancement, neglecting no duty of citizenship and withholding his support and cooperation from no measure for the public good. He is now proprietor of the roller-process flouring mill at Juliaetta, and is an enterprising business man whose honorable methods commend him to the confidence and secure him the patronage of a large portion of the community with which he is connected. Mr. Holbrook was born in New Haven, Connecticut, March 29, 1830, and is of English descent, a representative of one of the early New England families. John Holbrook, his great-grandfather, was a native of the “merrie isle,” and thence crossed the Atlantic to the New World, taking up his residence in New Haven County, Connecticut. He had a family of five sons, four of whom served in the war which brought to America her independence, being loyal members of the Colonial army. The youngest served under General Harrison in the war of 1812. One of these sons, Abel Holbrook, was the grandfather of our subject. He was born in New Haven County, and during the Revolution served as captain of a company. By occupation he was a farmer, and operated his land with the aid of slaves, but becoming disgusted with the institution of slavery he freed his Negroes and was active in promulgating an abolition sentiment throughout the community. He was a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and lived...

Biographical Sketch of Lewis Deck

Lewis Deck, of Redlands, is a native of the “Keystone” State. His father, Henry Deck, was one of the pioneers of Waukeha County, Wisconsin, and had a family of nine children, of whom our subject is the oldest. He left home at the age of fifteen, and went to New York, and from there by the Panama route to California, in 1857. He had the measles while on board the vessel, and when he got on land had not money enough to buy his dinner. He first worked in the vegetable gardens at Marysville, for $20 a month. After this he mined in both quartz and placer mines from 1862 to 1883, all along the coast, but principally in Nevada, and some in Mexico. No man in Southern California, perhaps, has had a more varied experience, nor can they give a fuller history of early mining days than he. He made and lost many fortunes, but in 1883 gave up mining and turned his attention to horticulture. He is a true pioneer and has an extended knowledge of the...

Biography of Theron H. Palmer

Theron H. Palmer, architect and builder, and a worthy representative of the business men of Southern California, was born February 14, 1849, in Joliet, Illinois, to which place his parents emigrated from New York State several years previous. In his early childhood they removed to the young city of Chicago, where young Palmer attended school, and upon entering his teens started in to learn the drug business. Soon after the war of the Rebellion broke out, though considerably under the required age, fired by youthful patriotism, he attempted to enter the army, and was twice thwarted in his purposes by paternal interference. But not discouraged by failures, he made the third trial, which resulted in his becoming a member of Company G, Nineteenth Illinois Infantry, which afterwards became Battery B, of the First Illinois Light Artillery, and upon the reorganization of the army formed a part of the Third Division of the Fourth Army Corps, General O. O. Howard commanding. Mr. Palmer participated in twenty battles, was once slightly wounded, and was honorably discharged in Chicago, July 8, 1865, having served over four years. On retiring from the army he resumed the drug business for a few months, when, the mining excitement having attained its height in Montana, he and two room-mates, after reading the glowing accounts in the papers one evening, resolved to try their fortunes in the lottery of gold-seeking, and started for the mines the next morning, in May, 1866, and reached Salt Lake July 8. They spent about a year in Montana and Utah mines, then visited a number of different mining districts, and were...

Biography of Eli K. Anderson

ELI K. ANDERSON. – There is no pioneer of whom volumes might be written with more propriety than he whose name appears above. Miner, Indian fighter, relentless pursuer of horse thieves, pioneer of the great fruit industry of Southern Oregon, and sterling temperance man, and singular, almost passing belief, in this age of defilers of themselves of tobacco, a total abstainer his whole life long from the use of the weed, – such is our subject. He was born in Indiana in 1826; and, after various transferences of residence in that state, during which he learned the carpenter’s trade, he came to California with the Owen’s train in 1849, – being one of the Argonauts who steered their vehicles across the seas of grass and alkali deserts. They were afflicted with cholera and lost cattle on the way, but were not otherwise annoyed. Mr. Anderson stopped near the present site of Shasta City, and made the descent of the Sacramento river the next year in a skiff constructed of lumber, whip-sawed by himself with the help of three other young men. At Sacramento, they sold their boat for five hundred dollars, and went to San Francisco, where they bought a sail boat, and returned with a cargo of flour, which they disposed of at Marysville to good advantage. Anderson thereupon began working at his trade for sixteen dollars a day. In 1850, he came to the mines in Northern California, and was so fortunate as to be one of the original discoverers of the famous Scott bar, on Scott river, where for ten days they were unmolested by the...

Biography of Capt. John Harford

CAPT. JOHN HARFORD. – This distinguished captain, whose portrait is given here, is now a resident and one of the principal owners of the townsite of Pataha City, Washington, and was born in Westchester county, New York, February 14, 1828. In 1842 he removed to Kendal county, Illinois, and in 1850 journeyed westward to the city of San Francisco. In 1852 he located in Placer county, California, on a ranch where now stands the little city of Lincoln. He removed thence to Marysville, where he engaged in the butcher business until 1855. There he purchased a band of sheep at ten dollars per head which had been driven from Ohio. After the investment, he again became a rancher, and soon afterwards married Miss Maggie Harris, a woman who has proved herself a model wife and mother, and whose kind and winning ways have ever made for her household a home of happiness and love. In 1862 the captain removed to San Louis Obispo, where he erected the first wharf and the first warehouse building in that now Port Harford. He also became a member of the firm of Schwartz, Harford & Co., lumber dealers. With a capital of but five hundred dollars each, the partners retired in nine years with a nice little fortune. Captain Harford then commenced building a railroad from Port Harford to the city of San Luis Obispo, and after completing one mile associated himself with the noted steamship firm of Goodall, Perkins & Co. under the firm name of the San Luis Obispo & Santa Maria Valley Railroad Company. This fir constructed a railroad from...

Biography of Samuel M. McCurdy, M.D.

SAMUEL M. McCURDY, M.D. – This venerable deceased pioneer of the Lower Sound, whose name will ever be held in honorable regard by the people of this coast, was born near Londonderry, Ireland, in 1805. In his youth and early manhood he was favored with the best of educational advantages, and before crossing the water to America held the degree of M.D. from Trinity College, Dublin. In 1836 he had reached St. Andrews, New Brunswick, and was engaged in the practice of his profession. In 1849 he sought to begin life anew in the Golden state, and in the spring of 1850 was established at Marysville, California, still practicing medicine. With the penetration which enabled him to perceive the great future of a northern country, he decided to make Washington his home, and came in 1854 to the deep-wooded and rugged site of the present port of Washington, and in those solitudes erected the first house constructed of boards on the present site of the elegant McCurdy Block. Upon the outbreak of the Indian war, he enlisted as surgeon in the Northern Battalion, and served until the end of hostilities. Returning to his home he was appointed surgeon of the Marine Hospital, holding the position until 1859. Relieving himself in this year of that somewhat confining work, he associated himself with Traverse Daniels in the establishment and publication of the Port Townsend Register, the first newspaper published in Port Townsend, thus becoming one of the pioneers of journalism in Jefferson county. He was also one of the organizers of St. Paul’s church, and was ever foremost in urging forward...

Biography of Tyler Woodward

Tyler Woodward was born in Hartland, Windsor county, Vermont, in 1835, and is of Puritan descent. His grandfather fought in the war of the revolution, while his father, Erastus Woodward, participated in the war of 1812. He was educated in the common schools and the academies at Kimball, Union and Meriden, New Hampshire, and Thilford, Vermont. When he reached his majority, he taught school in his native town for one term during the winter. He lived at home until 1860, when he came to Marysville, California, and for one year served as clerk in a hotel of which his brother was proprietor. In the summer of 1861, he went to Washoe county, at the time the gold excitement had broken out in that region. Here for some months he was interested in a saw mill, located on the Truckee river, at the foot of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, where the Central Pacific railroad starts up the mountains. In the spring of 1862, he sold out and came to Oregon, spending the summer prospecting and mining in the vicinity of the Florence mines. The following winter he clerked in a store in John Day’s mines, where Canyon City is now located. He then located at Umatilla and for several months was engaged in stock feeding. In the spring of 1864, he purchased a stock of goods consisting of general merchandising and miners’ supplies; chartered a train and started for Stinking Water mines in Montana. He joined forces with a train in which L. H. Wakefield was interested, and together they started on the long and toilsome journey which was beset...

Pin It on Pinterest