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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Jay Paul Brown

Brown, Mrs. Jay Paul (See Grant and Foreman)—Alma Ramona Taylor born in Hanford, California, July 16, 1884, educat­ed in Missouri Valley College, Marshall, Missouri and Fairmont Seminary, Weatherford, Texas, graduating from the latter in 1905, specialized in instrumental music. She married at Chouteau November 27, 1917, Jay Paul, sons of Paul Jay and Martha A. Browns, born October 15, 1874 in Wood County, Ohio. They are the parents oh Martha Sue Brown, born at Muskogee, December 28, 1919. Mr. Brown is a merchant at Chouteau. Ann Olivia, daughter of Isaac and Catherine (Rathiff) Bushyhead was born in Georgia, November 27, 1830, educated at Dwight Missions. Married October 4, 1846, John Brown Choate, born March 5, 1824. She died April 29, 1877 and he died February 16, 1893. They were the parents of Susie Jane Choate, born November 29, 1853. Married December 14, 1882 Robert Stewart Taylor, born November 27, 1830 in Washington County, Pennsylvania and graduated from Jefferson College, Pennsylvania. He died September 1897 and she married January 1, 1902, Valentine Gray. She died February 10,...

Biography of Thomas Harper Cobbs

Thomas Harper Cobbs, lawyer and senior member of the firm of Cobbs & Logan, 1111-1116 Third National Bank building, St. Louis, Missouri, was born August 26, 1868, on a farm in Fairview township, Lafayette county, about six miles southeast of Napoleon, Missouri. His father, Thomas T. Cobbs, was a native of Tennessee. His grandfather, Thomas Cobbs, was a native of Virginia and a descendant of EnglishWelsh parents. His grandfather was among the pioneer settlers of Lafayette county, having come to that county in 1830, and having built the first gristmill in that section. After his grandfather’s death, his father operated the old water power gristmill until it became out of date and then devoted himself to farming until 1890, when he retired and moved to Marshall, Missouri, where he died in 1913. His mother, Catherine Harper Cobbs, was a native of Woodford county, Kentucky, and a member of the Harper family, one of the best known families in the “blue grass” region. They were breeders of fine horses and were the owners of “Longfellow” and “Tenbroek,” two of the most famous race horses of their day. His mother died at Marshall, Missouri, in 1910. He has one brother, William S. Cobbs, of Norborne, Missouri, and one sister, Mrs. Ethel Hyland, of Marshall, Missouri, now living and has lost two sisters, Mrs. Catherine Chinn and Mrs. Sarah Drysdale. Thomas Harper Cobbs was reared on the home farm and attended the Fairview district school and the Pleasant Prairie Cumberland Presbyterian church until he reached the age of seventeen years. In the fall of 1885 he entered Odessa College at Odessa, Missouri....

Biography of George W. Dailey

Few men can recite the story of Kansas since statehood from their own recollection. One of these men is George W. Dailey, now a resident of Topeka. Mr. Dailey is a true pioneer of Kansas. He arrived when this and all the country west of the Missouri River was a wilderness. He bore the hardships and difficult circumstances of the frontier settler. He helped defend the country when there was danger, and a public spirit and willingness to sacrifice himself for the benefit of others had been one of the distinguishing traits of his character. In March, 1860, he arrived in Topeka on horseback, he having traveled that way from Marshall, Missouri. He went direct from Topeka to Mission Creek, now called Dover, and with his cousin Charles W. Dailey acquired 800 acres of land in Wabannses county, just across the Shawnee County line. Thus he entered upon his life in Kansas on a comparatively large scale even for those days. After two years on that land he moved to Mission Creek and bought the Doty farm, now known generally as the Dailey farm. On March 7, 1862, Mr. Dailey married Eliza J. Doty. For a quarter of a century Mr. Dailey found all his time and energies absorbed in the management of his extensive farming and stock raising interests in the vicinity of Dover. In 1885 he moved to Topeka, and that city had since been his home, though his interests are still represented in the country districts of Shawnee County. George W. Dailey was born April 6, 1835, in Monroe County, New York, and grew up and...

Biography of Sidney Thorne Able

(Sketch written by Judge Nelson E. Lurton, Commissioner of the United States Court, at Shanghai, China, who served in Mr. Able’s law office as his assistant from 1912 to 1916.) It is so unusual to find read merit displayed in a man until he has been put through some of the trying experiences of life that it is a pleasure to find such in one born and reared as Sidney Thorne Able was, surrounded with all the comforts of life, the son of a southern banker and cotton planter. In order to know a man well we must know something about his boyhood days. The photograph of his boyhood home reproduced from a small kodak picture, shows Sidney Thorne Able, a bare legged boy about to enter the Mississippi home in which he lived until he was seventeen years of age, when he came to St. Louis to enter Washington University. In the pony cart is his sister, Elise, now Mrs. George Doling Haynes of Kansas City. Much to the delight of the boy, the home was equipped with a complete gymnasium and with bowling alleys. As a boy he spent much time riding horses and upon Chatam plantation at Erwin, Mississippi, a plantation that extended almost the entire length of and along the north shore of Lake Washington and required over one hundred and twenty-five mules and a hundred negro families for its operation. He also spent many summers in Asheville, North Carolina, and about his mother’s odd home in Airlie, Halifax county, North Carolina. Sidney Thorne Able was born in Water Valley, Mississippi, February 24, 1889. His...

Biography of Raymond William Moore, M. D.

Raymond William Moore, M. D. Medicine embraces a vast field of knowledge and the successful physician must be a man of varied learning. Never at any time has the healing art demanded more in its practioners than at the present day and never has the profession given so fair an account of itself. Find the leading physician in a community and this acquaintance will indicate, with few exceptions, the man of most intellectual attainments, the keenest mind, the most progressive spirit. In this category stands Raymond William Moore, president of the Crawford County Medical Society, who since 1899 has been engaged in practice at Arcadia. Doctor Moore was born at Marshall, Saline County, Missouri, September 22, 1872, and is a son of Levi J. and Nancy Priscilla (Horsman) Moore. The family originated in Ireland and settled at an early date in Ohio, probably during colonial times, and the doctor’s grandfather, a farmer of the Buckeye State, died there in 1858. Levi J. Moore was born May 1, 1842, in Hocking County, Ohio, where he was reared and educated and where he resided until young manhood, when he removed to Iowa. While living in the latter state the Civil war came on and in 1861 he enlisted in the Third Iowa Cavalry, with which he fought in a number of severe engagements, including the battle of Pea Ridge. Shortly after that engagement he received a severe injury which incapacitated him for further duty at the front, and he was accordingly transferred to the One Hundred and Sixty-ninth Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, and did hospital duty during the rest of the...

Biography of Edward S. Rea

Edward S. Rea. One of the largest milling concerns in Southern Kansas is the Rea-Patterson Milling Company of Coffeyville. The plant was established at Coffeyville in 1894, and at that time the daily capacity of the mill was 400 barrels. Since then, by gradual additions and improvements, the daily capacity is now 1,800 barrels of uour and 600 barrels of meal, while the elevator capacity is 700,000 bushels, this being one of the largest mills in the state. In fact the product from the Rea-Patterson Milling Company has a very wide distribution, particularly over the South and Southwest, and the company sends flour to Cuba and the Eastern states. The original capital of the company was $50,000, and it is now $300,000. The plant is conveniently situated with respect to the tracks of the Missouri Pacific, Missouri, Kansas and Texas and Santa Fe railroads. The officers of the Rea-Patterson Milling Company are: H. W. Read, of Coffeyville, president; Edward S. Rea, treasurer and manager; and F. H. Patterson of Fredonia, secretary. Edward S. Rea was born at Marshall, Missouri, August 16, 1872. His father, P. H. Rea, a veteran business man and miller still living at Marshall, was the founder of the Rea-Patterson Milling Company at Coffeyville, and is still its largest stockholder. P. H. Rea was born in Carroll County, Missouri, May 3, 1840. Reared in Missouri, and of Southern antecedents, he sided with the South in its struggle during the ’60s, and was in the Confederate army with Gen. Joe Shelby under Gen. Sterling Price. His home district was closely divided between Northerners and Southerners, and naturally...

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