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Biography of George E. Gray

The profession of the law, when clothed with its true dignity and purity, and strength, must rank first among the callings of men, for law rules the universe. The work of the legal profession is to formulate, to harmonize, to regulate, to adjust, to administer those rules and principles that underlie and permeate all government and society and control the varied relations of man. As thus viewed, there attaches to the legal profession a nobleness that cannot but be reflected in the life of the true lawyer, who, conscious of the greatness of his profession, and honest in the pursuit of his purpose, embraces the richness of learning, the profoundness of wisdom, the firmness of integrity and the purity of morals, together with the graces of modesty, courtesy and the general amenities of life. The leading attorney of Malad, and a worthy representative of his calling is George E. Gray. Born in Sparta, Wisconsin, July 26, 1867, he is of Scotch, Irish and German descent. His father, P. D. Gray, was born in New York and when a young man removed to Wisconsin, where he married Miss Harriet L. Nash, a native of Vermont. Both parents are still living in Wisconsin and are well-to-do and respected citizens of that state. They had three children, George E. being the eldest. Having acquired a good preliminary education, he entered the University of Wisconsin, wherein he pursued both a literary and law course, graduating in the law department with the class of 1891. He was then admitted to the bar of his native state, and coming to Idaho soon afterward, at Boise,...

Biography of Henry Peck

The first settler of the city of Malad was Henry Peck, who, in the year 1864, came to Oneida county and established his home upon the present site of the county seat. For many years he was prominently identified with the development and progress of the county, and his name is inseparably associated with the advancement, which has wrought a great transformation here, making the once wild region a fertile section of fine farms and pleasant homes. Mr. Peck was born in Greene County, New York, February 26, 1823, and was a representative of one of the old families of the Empire state, his parents being Charles and Sarah (Gosley) Peck. He was reared to manhood in New York, and having arrived at years of maturity was there married, in October, 1845, to Miss Julia E. North, a native of Connecticut and a daughter of Jonathan and Rachel (Bissell) North. Seven children were born to them ere they removed from New York to Nebraska, in the year 1857. For six years Henry Peck engaged in farming in that state and then went with his family to Farmington, Utah, whence he came to Malad the following year. This country had not then been surveyed, and he secured a squatter’s claim of one hundred and sixty acres, upon which he built a little log cabin, becoming the pioneer settler of the town. From that time until his death he was an active factor in the movements which have led to the upbuilding and improvement of this section of the state. When Mr. and Mrs. Peck came to Idaho they brought with...

Biography of Alice A. Thews

The lady whose name introduces this sketch needs no introduction to the residents of southeastern Idaho, for she is well known in this section of the state, and also in the capital city of Boise, where she has many friends. Her superior culture and ability have won public recognition through the honors that have been bestowed upon her by means of the public franchise, and she is now capably filling the office of county treasurer of Oneida County, making her home in Malad. Miss Thews is a native of Rock Island County, Illinois, and is a daughter of William and Charlotte (Innes) Thews, both of whom were born in England, the former of Irish parents. They were married in that county, and in 1850 emigrated to America, locating in Illinois, whence they removed to Boise, Idaho, in 1869, at which time the now beautiful capital was a small village giving little promise of the changes which the future was to bring to it. The father was a stonemason by trade, and had a small quarry in Boise. In 1891 his life labors were ended, and he passed away at the age of seventy-one years. His good wife still survives him, and is now in the eightieth year of her age. They were the parents of seven children, but the eldest son, Thomas I., volunteered in the service of his country during the civil war, and was killed in the battle of Trevilian’s Station. Only three of the children are now living: Mrs. H. C. Branstetter, of Boise; William B., formerly auditor of Oneida county and now a resident of...

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