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Biography of Alexander M. Dockery

Alexander M. Dockery was born in Livingston county, Missouri, February 11, 1845. His father is a distinguished minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Sarah E. McHaney, his mother, was a native of Kentucky; of their family of three children, the subject of this sketch is the only survivor. He received a thorough classical education in Macon Academy, Macon, Missouri. In 1863 he entered the St. Louis Medical College, from which he graduated in March, 1865, receiving his diploma. Dr. Dockery then located for the practice of his chosen profession in Linneus, Missouri, where he pursued the practice of medicine until the year 1867, when he removed to Chillicothe, Missouri, and there practiced successfully for six years, and from 1870 to 1874 filled with acceptance the office of county physician for Livingston county. In March, 1874, he abandoned the pracive of medicine and removed to Gallatin and, associated with Thomas B. Yates, Esq., established the Farmer’s Exchange Bank, now recognized as one of the solid financial institutions of the State, of which bank he has been cashier since its organization. Dr. Dockery certainly has few equals as a business manager and financier ; he is vigilant, tireless and energetic; is methodical in his habits and in all business transactions of whatever character coming under his supervision; is careful in forming opinions and is a man of decision and great force of character. He has, by skill; industry, and discreet management, accumulated quite a competency, and at this time is the second largest taxpayer in Daviess county. He has always been the friend and advocate of popular education, and deeply...

Biography of Sol. E. Waggoner

Sol. E. Waggoner, president of the Masonic Home of St. Louis, has long been a recognized leader in the Masonic fraternity of Missouri and has contributed much to the growth and success of the order in the state. A native of Ohio he was born March 8, 1851, and is justly proud to trace his descent from General Waggoner of Revolutionary war fame who was a resident of Virginia. His father, William Waggoner, lived for some time in Ohio and in 1858 established his home in Macon, Missouri. He was one of only eight in the entire county who supported Abraham Lincoln for the presidency in 1860 and the political antagonism which he thus engendered rendered it so uncomfortable for him that he removed to Iowa in 1861, where he later engaged in the contracting business. He married Malinda Small, a native of Pennsylvania, and she, too, came of Revolutionary war ancestry. Her death occurred in 1874, while William Waggoner long survived his wife and had reached the venerable age of ninety-two years when he passed away in 1902. Reared in Oskaloosa, Iowa, Sol. E. Waggoner there attended the public schools and after leaving the high school became a student in Oskaloosa College, from which he was graduated in due course of time. He was early identified with the Western Union Telegraph Company as circuit manager on the old overland route, accepting that position in 1867. He assisted in the transfer of the old line from Julesburg to Salt Lake City, which was completed in 1869, and as a result thereof the rail route supplanted the stage route of...

Biography of Harry C. Bohrer, M. D.

Dr. Harry C. Bohrer, a St. Louis surgeon, who though among the younger representatives of the profession, has attained a prominence that many an older physician might well envy, was born in Macon, Missouri, October 8, 1890. His father, the late George W. Bohrer, was also a native of this state and a representative of an old Pennsylvania family that was established in Missouri in pioneer times. The grandfather was David Bohrer, who came to Missouri long prior to the Civil war and devoted his life to agricultural pursuits here. George W. Bohrer was reared and educated in Kansas and Missouri and after attaining his majority took up educational work, which he followed to the time of his death, passing away at Brookfield, Missouri, in 1906, at the comparatively early age of thirty-eight years. He was also a graduate in medicine but never engaged in practice. He married Fannie Lankford, who was born in Shelbina, Missouri, and belonged to one of the pioneer families of Indiana. She still makes her home in St. Louis. Dr. Bohrer, the only child of the family, was educated in the public schools of Chicago, in the Bleese Military Academy at Macon, Missouri, and in the St. Louis College of Pharmacy, from which he was graduated in 1912, having pursued a two years’ course there which won for him the Ph. G. degree. He next entered the St. Louis University of Medicine and was graduated with the class of 1916. He afterward became an interne in the St. Louis Baptist Hospital, where he thus served for a year and was resident physician for two...

Biography of J. Carroll Montgomery, M. D.

J. Carroll Montgomery, M. D. In the office of Doctor Montgomery at Manhattan is a large map of Riley County showing in detail all the features of the county and particularly those which are the work and evidence of man’s activities. A number of different colored pegs or pins are usually found dotted about over this map. It is in this way that Doctor Montgomery as county and city health officer of Manhattan and Riley County keeps track of the district under his jurisdiction, a glance at one of these charts indicate the location of all infectious diseases prevalent in the county at the time, and other pegs show the status of sanitary conditions as to drainage, sanitary equipment, etc. By means of this and other methods Doctor Montgomery has a complete and immediate record or census of health conditions in the county. He has himself inaugurated many measures for the protection and safeguarding of public health and has introduced other systems which have been tried and approved elsewhere in the state or in other states. His own work may be credited with an important share in the reduction of the death rate of the county. At the same time a campaign of education has been carried on not only among the older but particularly among the younger generations. Many of the facts of hygiene and sanitary standards are now familiar knowledge where a few years ago they were either unknown or ignored. It was Doctor Montgomery who originated the so-called “Junior Health Officer System” in the public schools of Riley County and in the state at large. Under...

Enyart, Lora Gertrude Halley Mrs. – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Mrs. E. B. Enyart passed away Friday evening, January 12, 1940, at the family home in Enterprise, about four hours after she had a stroke. She was active as usual thru the day and was preparing supper in the evening when she was taken ill, and sat down for relief. In a few minutes she became unconscious, and she passed away at about nine o’clock. Funeral services were held Monday afternoon in the Booth chapel conducted by E. E. Callahan of the Christian church, and burial was in Enterprise cemetery. The pall bearers were Ben Tucker, Robert Resse, Sam White, Vester Doran, William Bennett and Cecil Patten. Lora Gertrude Halley was born at Macon City, Missouri, February 3, 1869 and was married in that city to E. B. Enyart, July 11, 1885. They came west in 1890 and located at Dayton, Washington. In 1899 Mr. Enyart came to Wallowa county and settled in Paradise, and his wife followed the next year. The remained on their farm until 1937 when they sold out and moved to town. Surviving are Mr. Enyart and six children; Mrs. Lulu Victor, Walter Enyart, and Mrs. Edna Pratt of Enterprise, Vollie Enyart of Lowden, George Enyart of Ontario and Lester Enyart of Grangeville, Idaho, and there are eight grandchildren. One sister, Mrs. Pearl Stigall, lives at Eldorado Springs, Missouri, and a brother, Austin Harris, lives at Moberly, Missouri. Source: Enterprise Chieftain, Enterprise, Oregon, January 18, 1940 Contributed by: Sue Wells Transcribed by: Belva...

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