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Biography of John C. Fox

Eighteen years have come and gone since John C. Fox arrived in Hailey. The town was then in its infancy, and throughout the intervening period he has been a prominent factor in the advancement of the commercial interests upon which the growth and prosperity of a village always depend. Widely known, his life history cannot fail to prove of interest to his many friends, and it is therefore with pleasure that we present this record of his career to our readers. Mr. Fox was born July 2, 1847, in Pennsylvania, a son of Daniel Fox, who was of German descent. The father married Mrs. Jane Titman, a daughter of Issachar and Elizabeth (Morris) Corson. The maternal grandfather of our subject was of French-Huguenot ancestry, descended from Cornelius Corson, who belonged to the religious sect so bitterly persecuted in France. The edict of Louis XIV, which resulted in the expulsion of all the Huguenots from the country, was dated October 18, 1685, and it must have been soon after that when Cornelius Corson fled from the land of his birth. He took up his residence on Staten Island, for his will was pro-bated there in 1693. His son, Benjamin Corson, emigrated to Bucks County, Pennsylvania, where several generations of the family have resided. Among those who have borne the name have been several prominent physicians and scholars of note, and the family history is one of which the descendants may well be proud. At an early day the Corsons became members of the Society of Friends, and in harmony with the teachings of that sect were opposed to warfare, so...

Biography of William Clinton Bardo

William Clinton Bardo, vice president of the Security National Bank of Arkansas City, was a pioneer in the Cherokee Strip of Oklahoma, was a homesteader and farmer there for a number of years, but finally moved across the line to Arkansas City, where he had become prominent in financial and business affairs. Mr. Bardo is of an old Pennsylvania family. The lineage goes back originally to France. Four brothers of the name during the turbulent times that led to the French Revolution came from France and landed in Pennsylvania, and from there their families became widely scattered. One of the number, Abraham Bardo, settled near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and left two sons, Abraham and Daniel. The latter was W. C. Bardo’s paternal grandfather and was born in Pennsylvania in about 1790. Daniel Bardo and his wife in about 1820 moved to that part of Pennsylvania later organized into Penn Township of Lycoming County, and he had to make a road through the forest to reach his homestead. The emigrants left the river bottoms, for the “hills, big trees, good lands” was their motto. Daniel Bardo lived the sturdy life of a farmer, and died there in 1863. His wife, Catherine (Sellers) Bardo, died in Lycoming County when ninety-six years of age. Seven children were born in the pioneer home of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Bardo. They were George, Sarah, Samuel, Anna, John G., Jacob and Mary. John G. Bardo was born in 1827, and married a school teacher, Savilla Baker, who was born November 11, 1828, near the Town of Hughesville, Pennsylvania, a danghter of Samuel and Hannah Baker. John...

Biography of Manasseh Stewart Knox

Manasseh Stewart Knox is one of the oldesb residents of Pottawatomie County. His own recollections of that district cover a period of sixty years, beginning in his early childhood. He knew Pottawatomie County when it was a virtual wilderness and when Kansas was still in the throes of the free stats struggle. Mr. Knox is one of the most substantial land holders and formerly one of the largest farmers in Northern Kansas and is president of the First National Bank of Havensville and had banking interests elsewhere. He was born in Cayuga County, New York, August 21, 1843. His ancestors were Scotch-Irish and English and were colonial settlers in Virginia, His grandfather, John Knox, was a native of Virginia and perhaps through disinclination to the institution of slavery he moved north into Pennsylvania, freeing his slaves. He became a farmer and millwright in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, where he died in 1845. His son, John Knox, Jr., served with the rank of colonel in the Civil war and was killed in battle. The founder of the family in Kansas was Charles S. Knox, who was born in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, in 1810. He grew up there and when a young man went to Cayuga County, New York, where he became a farmer and where he married. It was in June, 1857, that he joined the pioneers of Pottawatomie County, Kansas. His homestead of 160 acres, now owned by his son M. S. Knox, was two miles north of Havensville and close to the old and now almost forgotten town, America City. Charles S. Knox was one of the useful pioneers...

Biography of Henry Chase Bradbury

Henry Chase Bradbury. It is truly a fortunate man who can come to his seventy-third year with a record of so much good accomplished, with many responsibilities discharged and burdens bravely sustained as have been part and parcel of the life and experience of Henry Chase Bradbury, now living at Lincoln. Rev. Mr. Bradbury is the oldest active missionary of the Presbyterian Church in Kansas. For all the more than forty years of work he had done in Kansas Mr. Bradbury enjoys a vigorous old age and only his more intimate friends know that he had passed the three score and ten mile post. His early environment and inheritance probably predisposed him for the career and vocation he had followed. The Bradbury ancestors came from England to Maine in colonial times, his remote ancestor having acted as an agent of Ferdinand Gorges, 1620, who had extensive colonization rights from the Crown and made the first settlement along the coast of Maine. His father was Elbridge Bradbury, a prominent scholar, educator and minister and spent his last years in Kansas. Elbridge Bradbury was born at Medford, Massachusetts, August 2, 1805. He was a graduate of the Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire and in 1831 graduted from Amherst College. He taught in a classical school at New Lebanon, New York, and afterwards had charge of a classical and English school at Hudson, New York. In the fall of 1835 he entered Princeton Theological Seminary, and after three years was ordained as a Presbyterian minister in the New Brunswick Presbytery. His talents well fitted him for missionary work and he established...

Biographical Sketch of A. W. Kreamer

A. W. Kreamer, lumber merchant, was born in Center County, Pa., December 6, 1844. He attended school at Marklseville Normal Institute. Also attended the Union Seminary in Union County, Pa. He united with the Evangelical Church, and has been a minister of that denomination from 1867 until the present time. He came to Jewell City, Kan., in February 1879, when he had charge of the church at that place, until 1880. He then engaged in the lumber business. Was married in Montoursvilie, Lycoming Co., Pa., August 10, 1869, to Miss L. A. Strevey, and has two children – William E., born August 31, 1871 and Roland A., born November 4,...

Biography of John McEwen Ames

John Moewen Ames. One of the leading business institutions of Caney, Kansas, is that operating under the name of Kan-o-Tex Refining Company, an industry which has contributed materially to the importance of this city as a center of business activity. The credit for the success of this enterprise is largely due to its president, John McEwen Ames, a man of broad experience and marked business talents, who, until coming to Caney in 1915, had been identified with large business corporations in the East. Mr. Ames was born in New York City, New York, February 12, 1867, and is a son of John Hubbard and Sarah Lucy (Hyde) Ames. He belongs to a family which originally came from England to Weathersfield, Connecticut, during colonial times, and on his father’s side has Revolutionary ancestors, one being Ithiel Battle, the grandfather of his maternal grandmother, who enlisted in the patriot army from Tyringham, Massachusetts; while another was Josiah Harvey, a surgeon’s mate who enlisted from Connecticut, and who was the father of Mr. Ames’ grandfather’s mother. Mr. Ames is also directly descended from Mayflower ancestors, as is shown in the following genealogy: John Tilly and wife were on the Mayflower, and both died a little after coming ashore. Their daughter, Elizabeth Tilly, was married in 1620, when fourteen years of age, to John Howland, aged twenty-eight years, also of the Mayflower. Their daughter, Hope Howland, of Plymouth, was married in 1646 to Elder John Chipman, Boston, 1631; Barnstable, 1649; Sandwich, 1684-1708. Desire Chipman, daughter of Elder John and Hope (Howland) Chipman, born February 26, 1673-4, died 1705, married February 23, 1692, Col....

Biography of Rev. Dr. Michael M. Stolz

Rev. Dr. Michael M. Stolz. It would be impossible to do justice in a brief sketch to the life of this devoted follower of Christ and pioneer Methodist leader of Kansas. Doctor Stolz entered the ministry while the great Civil war was being fought. He served faithfully in Indiana and elsewhere, and for nearly forty years had been identified with the Kansas Conference. He is now retired from the active ministry, a resident of Salina, but though past eighty-one years of age still finds congenial employment as librarian of the Kansas Wesleyan University. He was born April 30, 1836, at New Berry, Pennsylvania, a son of William and Jane M. (Smith) Stolz. Both parents were natives of Pennsylvania and had nine children, six sons and three daughters: Michael M.; Alexander, deceased; William H.; David S., now a resident of Ellsworth, Kansas; Daniel S., living in Los Angeles, California; Joseph, of Los Angeles; Elizabeth M., of White Plains, New York, widow of Clinton Fish; Rebecca Jane, wife of George Leonard of Williamsport, Pennsylvania; and Caroline, deceased. The common schools of Pennsylvania furnished Doctor Stolz his early education until he was eighteen years of age. He then entered the Dickson Seminary at Williamsport, where he spent two years. Coming west to Indiana in 1859, he entered the old Asbury University, now DePauw University, at Greencastle, Indiana. He was a student in that old Methodist institution until he graduated in 1862. Of the class of twenty-four who at that time entered actively upon the duties of the world he is now the only survivor. In the year of his graduation he joined...

Fort Brady, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania

Fort Brady was the dwelling house of Capt. John Brady, at Muncy, stockaded by digging a trench about four feet deep and setting logs side by side, filling in with earth and ramming down solid to hold the palisade in place. They were usually twelve feet high from the ground, with smaller timbers running transversely at the top, to which they were pinned, making a solid wall. Capt. Brady’s house was a large one for the time; he had been a captain in the Scotch-Irish and German forces west of the Alleghenies under Col. Henry Bouquet in his expedition, which Dr. Egle tells us composed the Bouquet expeditions, and had received a grant of land with the other officers in payment for his services. He was a captain in the 12th Pennsylvania regiment in the Revolution and was wounded at the battle of the Brandywine. His son, John, a lad of fifteen, stood in the ranks with a rifle and was also wounded. Sam, his eldest son, was in another division and assisted to make the record of Parr’s and Morgan’s riflemen world famous. The West Branch, in its great zeal for the cause of the colonist, bad almost denuded itself of fighting men for the Continental army. Consequently, on the breaking out of Indian hostilities a cry for help went up from these sparsely settled frontiers. Genl. Washington recognized the necessity without the ability to relieve them. He, however, did all in his power by mustering out such officers as would be likely to organize such defense and restore confidence to these justly alarmed communities, distributing the men...

Fort Antes, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania

Fort Antes was erected by Lieut. Col. Henry Antes in 1778, about opposite Jersey Shore on the east side of Nippenose creek, and on the higher plateau overlooking it, and also the river. It was defended by Col. Antes, its builder, until ordered to vacate it by Col. Samuel Hunter, at the time the military authorities considered it unsafe to attempt to defend these forts. Col. Hunter sent word to Col. Hepburn, then commanding at Fort Muncy to order all above him on the river to abandon the country and retire below. Meginness’ Otizinachson says, “Col. Hepburn had some difficulty in getting a messenger to carry the order up to Col. Antes, so panic stricken were the people on account of the ravages of the Indians. At length, Robert Covenhoven and a young millwright in the employ of Andrew Culbertson, volunteered their services and started on the dangerous mission. They crossed the river and ascended Bald Eagle Mountain and kept along the summit till they came to the gap opposite Antes’ Fort. They then cautiously descended at the head of Nippenose Bottom and proceeded to the fort. It was in the evening and as they neared the fort the report of a rifle rang out upon their ears. A girl had gone outside to milk a cow, and an Indian lying in ambush fired upon her. The ball, fortunately, passed through her clothes and she escaped unhurt. The orders were passed on up to Horn’s Fort and preparations made for the flight.” Fort Antes was a refuge for the Indian land or Fair Play men, as well as for...
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