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Slave Narrative of Marshall Mack

Person Interviewed: Marshall Mack Date of Birth: September 10, 1854 Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Age: 83 I was born September 10, 1854. I am the second child of five. My mother was named Sylveston Mack and my father Booker Huddleston. I do not remember my mother’s master, ‘came he died before I was born. My Mistress was named Mancy Mack. She was the mother of six children, four boys and two girls. Three of dem boys went to the war and one packed and went off sons what and nobody beard from him doing of the whole war. But soon as the war was over he come home and he never told whar he had been. I never saw but one grown person flogged during slavery and dat was my mother. The younger son of my mistress whipped her one morning in do kitchen. His name was Jack. De slaves on Mistress’ place was treated so good, all de people round and ’bout called us “Mack’s Free Miggars.” Dis was 14 miles northwest of Liberty, county seat of Bedford County, Virginia. One day while de war was going on, my Mistress got a letter from her son Jim wid jest one line. Dat was “Mothers Jack’s brains spattered on my gun this morning.” That was all he written. Jack Huddleston owned my father, who was his half brother, and he was the meanest man I ever seen. He flogged my father with tobacco sticks and my mother after these floggings (which I never seen) had to pick splinters out of his back. My father had to slip off a...

Slave Narrative of Henry Banner

Interviewer: S. S. Taylor Person Interviewed: Henry Banner Location: County Hospital, Little Rock, Arkansas [HW: Forty Acres and a Mule] “I was sold the third year of the war for fifteen years old. That would be in 1864. That would make my birthday come in 1849. I must have been 12 year old when the war started and sixteen when Lee surrendered. I was born and raised in Russell County, Ol’ Virginny. I was sold out of Russell County during the war. Ol’ Man Menefee refugeed me into Tennessee near Knoxville. They sold me down there to a man named Jim Maddison. He carried me down in Virginny near Lynchburg and sold me to Jim Alec Wright. He was the man I was with in the time of the surrender. Then I was in a town called Liberty. The last time I was sold, I sold for $2,300,—more than I’m worth now. “Police were for white folks. Patteroles were for niggers. If they caught niggers out without a pass they would whip them. The patteroles were for darkies, police for other people. “They run me once, and I ran home. I had a dog at home, and there wasn’t no chance them gettin’ by that dog. They caught me once in Liberty, and Mrs. Charlie Crenchaw, Ol’ John Crenchaw’s daughter, came out and made them turn me loose. She said, ‘They are our darkies; turn them loose.’ “One of them got after me one night. I ran through a gate and he couldn’t get through. Every time I looked around, I would see through the trees some bush or...

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