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Biography of Capt. Enoch W. Pike

CAPT. ENOCH W. PIKE. – As a rule, the settlers of the Northwest have not passed through very much actual suffering in subduing the country; but their experiences have sometimes been severe, as is illustrated in the career of the subject of this sketch. Captain Pike is a native of Maine, and was born in 1842. Removing while a boy to Winona, Minnesota, he was led by the call for soldiers during the war to enlist in Company K. Ninth Regiment Minnesota Infantry Volunteers. His regiment was detached to subdue the Sioux, who were then at war with the settlers; but after this he served to the close of the war. Returning to his home in Minnesota, he was appointed postmaster at Lewiston, but learning of the opportunities in the far West, and having a soldier’s claim to public land, he crossed the continent, arriving at Salem in 1867. The expenses of the journey for himself and his young wife had exhausted his mans, but finding friends at the capital of Oregon, he was supplied with work and, in addition to making a living, was able to buy a lot and erect a dwelling. Being suited with Linn county he removed thither, and with his parents, recently from the East, engaged in agriculture. A back stroke, however, fell upon him there from having inconsiderately signed a note for a friend, who proved unreliable and left him to pay it. This ill-luck decided him to make use of his soldier’s claim as the nucleus of a new fortune. Repairing therefore in 1873 to Klikitat county, he located a claim in...

Biography of Leonard L. Thorp

LEONARD L. THORP. – This pioneer of the Yakima country is a native of Oregon, having been born in Polk county in 1845. He came to Klikitat county, at the present site of Goldendale, as early as 1858, and to the Yakima in 1861, engaging in stock-raising in the Moxee and Selah valleys until 1870, when he occupied his present place three miles from North Yakima, Washington territory, consisting of one hundred and twenty acres of very rich land. He also owns eighty acres somewhat nearer town, upon which he has an extensive orchard with a very fine exposure, and other requisites for the successful culture of fruit. His principal business is handling large lots of cattle, and delivering them to the various cities of the Sound. The early pioneer days of Mr. Thorp were eventful with the experiences relating to a frontiersman’s life. When he was but a boy of sixteen, the lonely family was surprised one morning by the appearance of an Indian war party bearing down upon the cabin. Hastily hiding the women in the feather beds, the father and son stationed themselves behind the fence out of sight of the Indians, who were approaching, with old Smohallah at their head, to reconnoiter. They were armed and mounted, and were decked with war paint. As they reached the fence, the elder Thorp sprang over the fence and seized the chief’s horse by the bridle, covering Smohallah himself with his revolver, and demanding the reason for such a warlike approach. Being quick-witted, the old Indian smiled and offered to shake hands in friendly fashion, saying, by way...

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