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Foster Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

The Fosters of Milbridge, Cherryfield, Sullivan, etc., are descended from a Mr. John Foster, who, with his wife, came to the Narraguagus river valley from Cape Elizabeth soon after the close of the Revolutionary War. He and his wife were English born; came to Halifax, thence to Cape Elizabeth and thence here. He had three sons, James, Robert and John.

Biography of Dr. Isaac R. Goodspeed

For fifty-six years-more than half a century, Dr. Isaac R. Goodspeed has been one of the foremost citizens of San Mateo County; coming here when a young doctor with the ink on his diploma hardly dry, he remained in the county ever since. During this time he has been identified with many successful business enterprises and has faithfully filled the various offices he has held for both San Mateo City and County. Dr. Goodspeed was born in China. Maine, on May 30, 1831. In 1854 he graduated from Bowdoin Medical College, one of a class of nineteen. Today he is the only living member of that class. He began the practice of medicine at Milwaukee, and in 1854 he was married to Miss Elizabeth P. Woodcock at Gardiner, Maine. A short time after his graduation he went west to Chicago, and in 1858 came to California. He tried mining in Nevada for a while, but with indifferent success; and soon came to San Francisco and opened an office on Kearny street, where he remained until 1860. In the Spring of this year he decided to try his luck down the peninsula. He liked the climate of Pescadero so well that he settled in this town and remained there for the next ten years. For two years he taught school. and practiced medicine. Then he went into the merchandise business and later on tried ranching, all the time keeping up the practice of medicine. His other activities while at Pescadero were, serving as Justice of the Peace, ex-officio Coroner, and Associate County Judge with one of the justices of the...

Biography of Chancey Adams, M.D.

Chancey Adams, M.D., a successful medical practitioner of Concord, was born in North New Portland, Me., March 15, 1861, son of Benjamin and Eliza Briton (Sawyer) Adams. He belongs to a branch of the famous old Massachusetts family of the same name. Henry Adams, the founder of the Massachusetts family, was an English emigrant, who came over to this country in the year 1630, with his eight sons, and settled in Braintree, in the Colony of Massachusetts. Of these eight sons, one subsequently returned to England. The names of the others, according to the records of Massachusetts, were: Peter, Henry, Thomas, Edward, Jonathan, Samuel, and Joseph. Samuel was the father of two sons, one of whom was Joseph Adams, who lived in North Chelmsford, Mass. Joseph was the father of Benjamin Adams, who was the father of William Adams, who was the father of Solomon Adams, who was the great-grand-father of Dr. Adams. Solomon Adams migrated from North Chelmsford, Mass., his native town, to Farmington, Me., at the close of the Revolutionary War. The record shows that he had served his country during that war from May 15, 1777, to May 15, 1780, in Captain James Varnum’s company, of Colonel Michael Jackson’s regiment; but his active military service actually extended beyond these dates. William Adams, son of Solomon and grandfather of Dr. Adams, was a native of Farmington, Me. He passed his entire life in that town, engaged in farming, and died June 12, 1862, at the age of seventy-three years. He married Nancy Hiscock, and had a numerous family of children, of whom three died in infancy. The...

Descendants of Nathan Coffin

Nathan Coffin (1) married Sarah Dole. Their child was Enoch (2), born Feb. 17. 1696. Enoch (2) married Jane Claghorn. They had a child, Beulah (3), born Oct. 10, 1748; died Jan. 29. 1773. Beulah (3) married Jonothan Pease, Jan. 6, 1769. They had a son, Paul (4), married Elizabeth Folger. She died Nov. 25, 1795. (See Descendants of John Folger) Paul (4), and Elizabeth (Folger) Pease had three children: Paul, Jr. Noah Judith (5) (5) Judith married John Kelley. Their children were: Noah Paul Catherine (6), b. Nantucket, Feb. 12, 1778; d. in Winthrop. Me., May 1, 1840; m. at Nantucket, to Consider Sturtevant, Nov. 24, 1802. (6) Consider Sturtevant and his wife, Catherine (Kelley) Sturtevant. For their issue seeĀ Descendants of Samuel Sturtevant in this...

Descendants of Joseph Stevens

Joseph Stevens, born Billerica, Mass., Oct. 20, 1720. Died in Winthrop, Maine, Oct. 2, 1791. Married Elizabeth Emery, born Billerica, 1723. Died Winthrop, Maine, Feb. 28, 1798. They moved to Winthrop, Me. from New Ipswich, N. H. in 1769. The names of their children were: Elizabeth, b. Oct. 10, 1744. Joseph, Jr., b. April 8, 1746. Joseph, Jr., b. Oct. 31, 1747. Ames, b. July 16, 1749. Samuel, b. April 28, 1751. Mercy, b. Nov. 23, 1752. Abel, b. April 27, 1755. Esther, b. Oct. 6, 1756. Ephrain, b. June 29, 1758. (2) William, b. July 4, 1760; d. Winthrop, Me., Sept. 17, 1823. Jonas, b. April 20, 1763. (2) Captain William Stevens, Joseph (1) and his wife, Susanna Whiting; she was born April 23, 1763 (twin to Joanna). She was daughter of Sargeant Jonathan Whiting, Revolutionary War. (See Mass. S. & S. Rev_ War. Page 172.) Married at Wrentham, Mass.. Oct. 29, 1750, Elloenai Thurston, daughter of Daniel and Debora (Pond) Thurston, born in Wrentham, May 19, 1728, died Jan. 23, 1770. (See Whiting Genealogy, Page 39.) William was Captain in Col. Lambs (Artillery) Reg., Jan. 1. 1777 to December 31, 1779. Also Jan. 1, 1780 to December 31, 1780. (See Mass. soldiers and Sailors in War of Revolution, Vol. XIV, Pages 986-7). Capt. William and Susanna (Whiting) Stevens had children as follows: Asenath, b. July 11, 1784. Susanna, b. Oct. 19, 1785. Martha, b. May 31, 1787. Elioenai, b-. Feb. 17, 1789; m. Alfred Chandler. Jane, b. Dec. 20, 1790. John, b. Sept. 22, 1793. Joanna, b. March 21, 1795; m. Samuel Morrill. William, Jr., b. July...

Descendants of Samuel Sturtevant

(1) Samuel Sturtevant, the immigrant ancestor of the family, was at Plymouth, Mass., as early as May 3, 1642; married in Plymouth in 1643, to Ann (surname unknown). ISSUE: Ann, b. June 4, 1647. John, b. Oct. 17, 1650. (2) Samuel, Jr., b. April 19, 1654; d. April 21, 1736. Hannah, b. Sept. 4, 1658. John, b. Sept. 4, 1655. James, b. Feb. 11, 1660. Joseph, b. July 16. 1666. Mary, b. Dec. 7 , 1668. Lydia, b. Dec. 13, 1670. (2) Dacon Samuel Sturtevant, Jr., b. April 19, 1654: d. April 21. 1736. His will is recorded at Plymouth Probate Court 1736, as of Halifax, Mass., in which he mentions his wife, Elizabeth, and children, but the records do not give many of the dates of deaths or marriages. Married Elizabetht 1676 (surname unknown). ISSUE William b.1678. Marcy, b. 1680. Samuel, b. 1682; m. Mary Price, Jan. 20, 1706. Hannah, b. 1684. Nehimiah, b. 1686. James, b.1688. Josiah, b. 1690. John, b. Feb. 10, 1692. (3) Moses, b. June 15, 1695. (3) Moses Sturtevant of Wareham, Mass., b. June 15, 1695; m. Elizabeth Howell, June 16, 1720, daughter of Thos. Howell of Mansfield, Mass. ISSUE Abigail, b. 1721. Joseph, b. 1723. Moses, b. 1725. Marcy, b. 1729. (4) Consider, b. April 5, 1733; d. Feb. 10, 1805. (4) Consider Sturtevant of Wareham, Mass., served as a soldier during the Revolutionary War, as Private in Capt. Nathaniel Hammond’s Company; enlisted July 17, 1775; Company stationed at Wareham and Rochester for defence of the sea-coast. Discharged Dec. 23, 1775. Re-enlisted in Capt. Timothy Child’s Company, Capt. David Wells Regiment. Raised...

Biography of F. H. Penley

Fortunate is the community which had citizens with the substantial conservatism of practical business men and yet are forward looking in matters of new development and improvement. In the matter of towns and communities there is perhaps more truth in Ingalls’ statement that opportunity knocks but once at the door, than in its application to individuals. Recently the oil district of Southern Kansas was extended into Butler County. By the good sense and public spirit of several local citizens, prominent among whom is F. H. Penley, president of the First National Bank of Augusta, this sudden development of great natural wealth and resources was utilized to the distinct advantage of what had been merely a country village, and Augusta is now on a fair way to become one of the thriving centers of population and industry in the state. Mr. Penley represents a pioneer family in Butler County and he had been personally identified with the business and civic life of this section of Kansas for forty years. He came to Kansas when a boy. He was born in the State of Maine at Bethel in Oxford County in 1856. His parents, Charles Freeland and Abbie (Locke) Penley, were also natives of Maine. They came to Kansas in 1870, locating about two miles north of Augusta. Charles F. Penley took up a homestead claim and was engaged in farming and stock raising there the rest of his active career. The Penleys were early comers and what they did and the influenee they exercised had its marked impress upon the subsequent development of the county. Mr. F. H. Penlcy was...

Biographical Sketch of Martin V. Smith

A veritable pioneer of the pioneers is Mr. Smith, having come to the Pacific coast in the early fifties and continued here in worthy labors in various lines since that time, ever displaying the same courage, capabilities, tenacity of purpose, and integrity, that have made the pioneers such a noble class of people. Mr. Smith was born in Kennebec county, Maine, on January 10, 1833, being the son of James and Hannah Smith, natives also of Maine, the father being born near Portland. His death also occurred in that state. Martin V. received a good schooling and remained with his parents until 1853, when he went to New York and stepped aboard of one of the Vanderbilt ships, that took him to Nicaragua, whence he went to San Francisco and soon we see him in the mines delving with the vigor and strength of young manhood for the hidden gold. Five years he labored there and then went to Yuba county and took up farming and raising stock. The hard winter of 1861-62 killed all his stock and he went to freighting from Marysville to various points in California and Nevada. In 1873 he went to Butte County and settled on one of Judge O. C. Pratt’s grants and went to farming. His landlord was the first territorial governor of California. Mr. Smith was successful in this venture and continued until 1880, when he went to the foot hills in Butte county and engaged in gardening and fruit raising until 1884. Then he freighted until 1886 and came overland to Silver Creek, Harney county. He entered land and took...

Biographical Sketch of Ulmer Stinson

ULMER STINSON. – Mr. Stinson is among the most successful of the lumbermen of the Snohomish, and like the most of his compeers in this business is a native of Maine, having been born in Kennebec County in 1836. He lived, was educated and gained his business head in his native town, leaving it only at the age of twenty-seven. From his youth he was a lumberman and logger. But in 1863 he determined to try business upon a somewhat larger scale, and selected this coast as his field. He mined a year in Nevada county, California, but tiring of the unaccustomed life of that region sailed up to the Sound on a bark, and found his first home at Port Gamble. Soon he saw the inducements of living at Snohomish, Washington Territory, and after twelve years for others engaged in logging on that river for himself. To be a successful logger one requires extreme prudence. The was of breaking up are numerous, and the path to a competence narrow. Our subject, however, has not lost the way, but for a number of years has been operating and laying by a surplus at each clean up. He employs some twenty-five men. His timber and farm lands embrace fifteen hundred acres; and he owns a fine residence in the city. He was married at Clinton, Maine, in 1856, to Miss Christina Stewart, a native of Maine, and a lady of intelligence and refinement. They have three children, George Edgar, Charlotte E., the wife of James B. Cole, and Marette E. Mr. Stinson is a very large man physically, and is...

Biography of Samuel B. Varney

Samuel B. Varney. As told on other pages of this work, the founding and early growth of Champaign was largely due to the construction of the Illinois Central Railway. One of the first active settlers in the community was Samuel B. Varney, a pioneer whose influence did much for Champaign in its formative stages and whose name is one to be spoken with respect and cherished with honor. He died when Champaign was a small and struggling town, and the only one of his children still living is Mrs. L. V. Crane, who resides at 412 West Church Street in Champaign. The late Samuel B. Varney was born in Albion, Maine, April 27, 1812. He spent many years in his native state, engaged in farming, in the strenuous endeavor to coax a living from the rocky soil, and was also a merchant, manufacturer and hotel proprietor. When the Illinois Central Railway was built large bodies of land were granted to the company as a bonus, and the company sold this land to investors in many parts of the country. One of the buyers was Samuel B. Varney, who acquired a quarter section four miles from the then new town of Champaign. After making this investment Mr. Varney came to Illinois in 1859, when the railroad had just been completed, and at the same time he bought four lots in the J. P. White Addition, the first addition made to the town of Champaign. On one of those lots he erected his home in 1859, and that old residence is still standing as a landmark of the larger city which...
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