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Biography of James S. Hudson

JAMES S. HUDSON. This gentleman is one of the substantial residents of Newton County, Arkansas, and is also one of the pioneers of the same, for he has resided here since his birth, which occurred on February 4, 1857. His uncle, Samuel Hudson, was the first white settler of the county, having come to this region in 1830, and his brother, Andrew Hudson, the father of James S., came here in 1835 from his native county of Jackson,Tennessee, where he was born in 1818. He settled on a farm about three miles west of where Jasper now is on Little Buffalo Creek, and so dense was the cane along that bottom that he was compelled to get out and cut a road through it. He lived on this farm for some years, but later moved to a farm one mile west of Jasper, on which his son William now resides, and where he died in the fall of 1891. He was quite successful in the accumulation of worldly goods, and was a substantial, law-abiding and public-spirited citizen. In his political views he always supported the principles of Democracy and at one time ably filled the office of county treasurer. Wild game was abundant when he first came to this section, and he and his brother Samuel became well known as hunters, for many were the deer and bears that fell victims to their unerring marksmanship. Mr. Hudson was married to Miss Sarah Holt, a native of Tennessee, who survived him about one year, having become the mother of the following children: Nancy, married I.J. Dum and died in California;...

Biography of Hon. M. T. Brisco

In reviewing the various professional interests of Newton County, Arkansas, the name of M. T. Brisco cannot be ignored, for he is one of her most successful legal lights. Although it is a known fact that, given the ordinary average education and good judgment, any man may make a success in the avenues of trade, yet in the profession of law he must be endowed with superior intelligence and have gone through years of careful study and training to be able to cope with the brilliant minds which do honor to the bench and bar. Mr. Brisco is a gentleman of well-known ability, and one who is an ornament to the profession. He owes his nativity to Searcy County, Arkansas, where he was born January 1, 1846, a son of Isham and Rebecca (Parker) Brisco, who were born in North Carolina in 1816 and Tennessee in 1823, respectively. The father was a lad of about twelve years when he became a resident of Washington County, Arkansas, coming thither with some of his elder brothers, and, as wild game was very plentiful in the region at that time, he and his brothers became quite noted hunters. He was a thoroughly self-educated man, was a successful school teacher, and was an exceptionally skillful penman, but the most of his life was devoted to tilling the soil, in which occupation he met with a good degree of success. In 1836 he took a trip to Texas, traveling over that country on horseback, but owing to the unsettled condition of the country he did not locate there, but returned to Arkansas, and for...

Biography of James Le Grand, M. D.

JAMES LE GRAND, M. D. In a comprehensive work of this kind, dealing with industrial pursuits, sciences, arts and professions, it is only fit and right that that profession on which, in some period or other of our lives (the medical profession) we are all more or less dependent, should be noticed. It is the prerogative of the physician to relieve or alleviate the ailments to which suffering humanity is heir, and as such he deserves the most grateful consideration of all. A prominent physician, who, by his own ability, has attained distinction in his profession, is Dr. James Le Grand, who was born in Dubois County, Indiana, December 26, 1843, the elder of two children born to John and Sophia (Hanks) Le Grand, the former of whom was born in the Old North State, but who, at an early day, became a resident of Indiana, in which State he married and made his home until 1848. He was the father of eight children by his first wife, whom he lost in the State in which he married her, and he afterward married the widow of Dillon Lynch, who bore him six children. He then wedded Miss Hanks, and by her became the father of two children; James and his sister Rebecca, who is deceased, making in all sixteen children born to him. John Le Grand removed to Missouri during the boyhood of his son James and made his home in St. Francois and Bollinger Counties, dying in the latter about 1872, having always been a prominent member of the Republican party. He held a number of official positions...

Biography of Capt. A. R. McPherson

CAPT. A. R. MCPHERSON. This worthy gentleman and old pioneer of Newton County, Arkansas, comes of fine old Virginia stock, although he, himself, was born in the State of Alabama, August 17, 1830, the seventh of eleven children born to the marriage of Reuben McPherson and Elizabeth Rash. The father was one of the early pioneers of Tennessee and took part in the War of 1812, under Gen. Jackson, with whom he participated in the battle of New Orleans. After the war he was married in Tennessee and moved with his young wife to Jackson County, Ala., where he was called from life, August 15, 1842. The following spring his widow sold the farm in Alabama and moved to Boone County, Arkansas, settling on Crooked Creek, seven miles south of Harrison, where she lived until October, 1848, when she came to Newton County and settled on the Hudson Fork of the Buffalo, where she has since made her home with the exception of the last four years. Her second husband was Rev. J. E. Casey, of Newton County, who died in 1863. She was born in 1799 and is now in her ninety-sixth year, and is by far the oldest person in this part of the country. Notwithstanding her advanced years she is in excellent health and enjoys the society of her children and grandchildren. Her children, eleven in number, were named as follows: S. R., who is living in Texas; Hiram, who died in Alabama at the age of thirteen years; Cynthia, who died in Boone County, Arkansas, the wife of Joseph Terry; Elizabeth, who resides in Marion...

Biography of Anthony Casey

ANTHONY CASEY. Anthony Casey is one of those men who faithfully served his country during the troublesome times of war and is now a prominent, law-abiding, public-spirited and patriotic citizen. He is a product of Tennessee, born in Morgan County, in 1826, and remained in that State until about eight years of age, when he came with his parents, Jesse and Martha (Coe) Casey, to Franklin County, Missouri About two years later the parents came to Johnson County, Arkansas, where they resided about five years and then moved to Newton County, making their home at the head of the Hudson River. There Mr. Casey purchased a farm and passed the remainder of his days, dying in 1863. He was a Southern sympathizer, but took no part in the war. For many years he was a Primitive Baptist minister, and a physician of more than ordinary ability. Although he never attended school more than three weeks in his life he possessed a naturally active brain and was a student all his days, being an eloquent speaker and an interesting conversationalist. His father, Jesse Casey, was of Irish origin and served through the Revolutionary war. The mother of Anthony Casey died about 1846. She was a daughter of Stephen Coe, who died in Tennessee. The twelve children born to this estimable couple were named as follows: Polly, deceased, was the wife of John Farmer; Tempa, widow of Thomas Farmer, of Texas; Elizabeth, widow of Zach. Beckam; Martha, wife of Lewis Daniel, of Newton County; Barbara, wife of Hijah Snow, of Texas; Steven, of Marion County; Elijah, of Indian Territory; Anthony; Levi,...

Biography of John Murphy

JOHN MURPHY. This prominent farmer and stockraiser of Harrison township, Boone County, Arkansas, was born in Miller County, Missouri, January 7, 1838, and probably inherits much of his push and energy from his Irish ancestors, his great-grandfathcr Murphy having been a native of the Emerald Isle. The latter came to America after the Revolutionary War and settled in the Palmetto State, where his last days were spent. His wife was a native of Wales. His son, John Murphy, grandfather of subject, was born in South Carolina, but at an early date settled near Murfresboro, Tennessee, where he died when his son, John J. Murphy, father of subject, was but a small boy. The latter was born near Murfresboro, Tennessee, in 1811, and was married in that State to Miss Perlinta Davis, a native of Tennessee, born in 1813. About 1837 this worthy couple removed to Miller County, Missouri, where they resided one year, and then came to Madison County, Arkansas Still later they removed to Newton County, Arkansas, and from there to Boone County in 1875, where Mr. Murphy died the following year. His wife passed away in 1877. They were Methodists for many years. Mr. Murphy was a successful farmer and stock dealer, owning many horses and mules, and was a public-spirited and enterprising citizen. Idiotically he was a Democrat until the war, but after that he affiliated with the Republican party. Our subject’s maternal grandfather Davis was probably a native Tennessee, but was of English origin. He was a farmer by occupation and died in Illinois. Our subject’s brothers and sisters were named as follows: Isaac N.;...

Biography of Daniel Phillips

DANIEL PHILLIPS. Among the honored and well-to-do tillers of the soil of Newton County, Arkansas, may be mentioned Daniel Phillips, whose many years of hard labor have been rewarded with abundant means. He is now in the enjoyment of a comfortable income, the result of intelligent management and undeviating industry, and enjoys the esteem and confidence of all with whom he has had business relations. He was born in Morgan County, Tennessee, August 27, 1846, being the sixth of nine children born to Jesse and Parmelia (Everage) Phillips, both of whom were born in the Old North State. The former died in Johnson County, Arkansas, in 1878, at the age of seventy-five years, in which section he had settled in 1859, and where he was successfully engaged in tilling the soil. During the lamentable Civil War he was a stanch Union man and all his sons were soldiers in the Federal Army. He became a strong supporter of the Republican party after the war, but being of a quiet and retiring disposition he never aspired to public preferment, choosing to leave the strife and turmoil of political life to others. He was a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as was his wife, who died in 1880 at the age of seventy-eight years. His father, John Phillips, was a North Carolinian. The children which he and his wife reared were as follows: Dinah, Miles H., Frances, Absalom, Margaret, Daniel, John, William, Tull, and one that is deceased. Daniel and Absalom are residents of Newton County, Arkansas, and the latter is a successful merchant of Marble City. Frances, who...

Biography of F. S. Baker

F. S. BAKER. This gentleman has been one of the wide-awake and enterprising citizens of Harrison, Arkansas, since 1873, but first saw the light of day in Smith County, Virginia, May 22, 1842, a son of Andrew and Mary (Hash) Baker, who were also Virginians. They came with their family to Fulton County, Arkansas, and there the father was successfully engaged in farming and merchandising up to the breaking out of the great Civil War, and they then moved to Jasper, Newton County. In 1862 the father enlisted as a lieutenant in the Confederate service, with which he served until the war closed, being a member of Company of the Fourteenth Arkansas Volunteers. He was in the battles of Pea Ridge, Port Hudson and others, but after the close of the war Mr. Baker returned to his native county of Grayson, Virginia, where he made his home for a number of years. He then returned to Arkansas, thence to Oregon, thence back to Arkansas, and is now living retired from the active duties of life in Harrison, being in the seventy-eighth year of his age. His wife has reached the seventy-sixth milestone of her life. They reared a family of six children: F. S.; Elizabeth, wife of E. Pugh, of Boone County; Levi, who is a miller at Bellefonte; Eli makes his home in the Indian Territory; Ietitia is the wife of William Cecil, of Harrison, and William is a resident of Oregon. Louisa and another child died when quite young. F. S. Baker attended the common schools and Liberty Academy of Smith County, Virginia, gaining thus a good...

Biography of William H. Cecil

WILLIAM H. CECIL. The calling of the merchant is one of the most hon-orable lines of industry, and one of its most worthy exponents at Harrison is William H. Cecil, who is a native of Jasper, Newton County, Arkansas, where he first saw the light of day July 9, 1854. His parents, Riley and Sarah (Harrison) Cecil, were born in Tennessee, and the former was a son of William Cecil, who became a resident of Newton County, Arkansas, during the early history of the county and settled on what is called the Cecil Fork of the Buffalo River. There the grandfather died at an early day, and his widow in 1857 started on the overland journey to California, and was in the wagon train that was massacred in Utah by the Mormons and Indians, known in history as the Mountain Meadow Massacre, but fortunately two days before that event she and her sons had left the train and taken another trail and thus escaped a horrible death. She was the mother of six sons and several daughters, of whom Riley was but a lad when his parents came to Arkansas. He was married in Newton County, and for some time thereafter lived on Big Buffalo River, the father dying there in 1856. He was a successful tiller of the soil, and to him-self and wife two children were born: William H. and Mary J., wife of John Wammock, of Harrison. The mother is still living and resides with the subject of this sketch. Her parents were Robert and Clarinda (Austin Harrison, who were early settlers of the county of...

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