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Biography of Prof. George Bush

George Bush, one of the most eminent Biblical scholars and Orientalists of his time in America, was born in Norwich, Vt., June 12, 1796, a son of John and Abigal (Marvin) Bush, and grandson of Capt. Timothy Bush. The boyhood of George Bush was mostly passed in Hanover, New Hampshire, whither his father removed when he was quite young. The son gave early indications of superior intelligence. His eldest sister says “he had a ravishing love of books from her first remembrance of him.” He frequented the College library at Hanover and would bring home ponderous volumes, almost as large as he could carry. Old residents remember him riding to mill on horseback with his face hidden in the pages of an open book that he held before him. At the age of nineteen he entered Dartmouth College, graduating in 1818 with the valedictory and the highest honors of his class, which was of more than average ability, containing among others such scholars as Professor William Chamberlain of Dartmouth College, and the late Professor Thomas C. Upham of Bowdoin College. During a part of his college course, Mr. Bush was a private tutor in the family of Honorable Mills Olcott, and there probably was formed an intimate friendship between himself and Rufus Choate of the class of 1819. The two young men chummed together during the college course, and Mr. Choate ever after kept a high regard for and estimate of his college friend. After teaching one year in the Orange County Grammar School at Randolph, Vt., Mr. Bush commenced the study of theology at Princeton Seminary, where he...

Nading, Wesley – Obituary

Funeral services for Wesley Nading, former resident of the Flat Rock community, whose death occurred at Indianapolis yesterday [June 9, 1933], had not been completed today, pending word from a daughter, Mrs. William Marsh, of Detroit. The body was brought to the Charles M. Ewing funeral chapel yesterday from Indianapolis. Mr. Nading at the time of death was 74 years of age. He leaves several nieces and nephews in this City. The Shelbyville Republican, June 10, 1933 Contributed by: Shelli...

Biography of Ira M. Mulliken

Ira M. Mulliken, junior member of the well-known firm of Barr & Mulliken and one of the rising young business men of Newman, was born in Champaign County, Illinois, December 17, 1865. His father, James W. Mulliken, was a native of Johnson County, Indiana, and removed to Champaign County in about 1852. His mother Catherine was a daughter of Rev. Samuel F. Miller, who was horn in 1815, and at present resides in Arcola. (See sketch of W. H. Bush, of Hindsboro.) In about 1868 the father of I. M. Mulliken removed to a farm near Hindsboro, where the latter remained until he arrived at the age of twenty-one years, when he went to Arcola to reside, and there worked at the carpenter’s trade. He attended Lee’s academy at Loxa, Illinois, for six months, then subsequently attended the embalming college at Indianapolis. From 1893 to June 1, 1896, he was a member of the undertaking firm of Mike, Miller & Co., at Charleston, Illinois. In the latter year he removed to Newman to accept a partnership with James Barr (see sketch). On September 4, 1893, he was married to Miss Ida A., a daughter of John W. Allison, of Arcola. They have one child, a daughter, Frances Marie. He is a member and noble grand of the I. O. O. F. elder iii the Christian Church, and superintendent of its Sunday school. He is also chief patriarch of the I. O. O. F. encampment; member of the Masonic fraternity, and clerk of the school board of Newman. The firm of Barr & Mullikin own two large stores in Newman,...

Old Battleground Cemetery Records, Indianapolis, Marion County, Indiana

Marion County, Indiana 4720 E. 75th St. out of Indianapolis; 1 block W. of State road #37 on 75th St. ABELL Emeline E., d. 16 Oct. 1887, ae. 68 yrs., 10 mos. Wife to Harman Abell. Harmon, d. 29 June 1850, ae. 36 yrs., 1 mo., 9 days. Husb. to Emeline E. Abell. ALLISON Ruth,, b. 1815, d. 1902. Wife to William Allison. William, b. 1816, d. 1892. Husb. to Ruth Allison. ARMENTROUT Frankie W., dau. of James W. Armentrout and A. E., d. 10 Aug. 1871, ae. 10 mos., 16 days. ARMSTRONG James, d. 27 Feb. 1849, ae. 56 yrs., 5 mos., 25 days. William H. A., d. 15 July 1847, ae. 20 yrs., 3 mos., 1 day. ASHBROOK Cintha Ann, d. 8 Dec. 1868, ae. 50 yrs., 8 mos., 24 days. Wife to Thomas A. Ashbrook. Thomas A., d. 5 Sept. 1849, ae. 49 yrs., 21 days. Husb. to Cintha Ann Ashbrook. BAER Catherine, b. 22 June 1801, d. 4 Dec. 1878. Daniel M., d. 18 July 1852, ae. 18 yrs., 5 mos. John C., d. 17 Mar. 1862, ae. 88 yrs., 5 mos., 29 days. BRUNSON Asber C., b. 25 June 1825, d. 2 July 1905. Husb, to Julia A. Risen. Md. 29 May 1853 in Hamilton Co., Ind. Caroline, b. 4 Sept. 1828, d. 2 July 1904. Claudia D., b. 2 Jan. 1872, d. 8 Feb. 1902. Stone next to Ella Bronson. Elizabeth, b. 1828, d. 1905. Wife to Erastus Brunson. Erastus, b. 14 May 1832, d. 6 Apr. 1896. Husb. to Elizabeth Brunson. Esther, b. 29 Feb. 1824, Wife to Jonathan Bronson. Jane, b....

Slave Narrative of John Eubanks & Family

Interviewer: Archie Koritz Person Interviewed: John Eubanks Location: Gary, Indiana Place of Birth: Barren County, Kentucky Date of Birth: June 6, 1836 Age: 98 Archie Koritz, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project Lake County-District #1 Gary, Indiana EX-SLAVES JOHN EUBANKS & FAMILY Gary, Indiana Gary’s only surviving Civil War veteran was born a slave in Barren County, Kentucky, June 6, 1836. His father was a mulatto and a free negro. His mother was a slave on the Everrett plantation and his grandparents ware full-blooded African negroes. As a child he began work as soon as possible and was put to work hoeing and picking cotton and any other odd jobs that would keep him busy. He was one of a family of several children, and is the sole survivor, a brother living in Indianapolis, having died there in 1935. Following the custom of the south, when the children of the Everrett family grew up, they married and slaves were given them for wedding presents. John was given to a daughter who married a man of the name of Eubanks, hence his name, John Eubanks. John was one of the more fortunate slaves in that his mistress and master were kind and they were in a state divided on the question of slavery. They favored the north. The rest of the children were given to other members of the Everrett family upon their marriage or sold down the river and never saw one another until after the close of the Civil War. Shortly after the beginning of the Civil War, when the north seemed to be losing, someone conceived the idea...

Slave Narrative of Mittie Blakeley

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Mittie Blakeley Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: Oxford, Missouri Date of Birth: 1858 Place of Residence: 2055 Columbia Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana FOLKLORE MRS. MITTIE BLAKELEY-EX-SLAVE 2055 Columbia Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Mrs. Blakeley was born, in Oxford, Missouri, in 1858. Her mother died when Mittie was a baby, and she was taken into the “big house” and brought up with the white children. She was always treated very kindly. Her duties were the light chores, which had to be well done, or she was chided, the same as the white children would have been. Every evening the children had to collect the eggs. The child, who brought in the most eggs, would get a ginger cake. Mittie most always got the cake. Her older brothers and sisters were treated very rough, whipped often and hard. She said she hated to think, much less talk about their awful treatment. When she was old enough, she would have to spin the wool for her mistress, who wove the cloth to make the family clothes. She also learned to knit, and after supper would knit until bedtime. She remembers once an old woman slave had displeased her master about something. He had a pit dug, and boards placed over the hole. The woman was made to lie on the boards, face down, and she was beaten until the blood gushed from her body; she was left there and bled to death. She also remembers how the slaves would go to...

Slave Narrative of Rosaline Rogers

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Rosaline Rogers Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: South Carolina Date of Birth: 1827 Age: 100 Place of Residence: 910 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana FOLKLORE MRS. ROSALINE ROGERS-EX-SLAVE-110 YEARS OLD 910 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Mrs. Rogers was born in South Carolina, in 1827, a slave of Dr. Rice Rogers, “Mas. Rogers,” we called him, was the youngest son of a family of eleven children. He was so very mean. Mrs. Rogers was sold and taken to Tennessee at the age of eleven for $900.00 to a man by the name of Carter. Soon after her arrival at the Carter plantation, she was resold to a man by the name of Belby Moore with whom she lived until the beginning of the Civil war. Men and women were herded into a single cabin, no matter how many there were. She remembers a time when there were twenty slaves in a small cabin. There were holes between the logs of the cabin, large enough for dogs and cats to crawl through. The only means of heat, being a wood fireplace, which, of course, was used for cooking their food. The slaves’ food was corn cakes, side pork, and beans; seldom any sweets except molasses. The slaves were given a pair of shoes at Christmas time and if they were worn out before summer, they were forced to go barefoot. Her second master would not buy shoes for his slaves. When they had to plow, their feet...

Slave Narrative of John H. Gibson

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: John Henry Gibson Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Scott County, N. C. Place of Residence: Colton Street Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE JOHN HENRY GIBSON-EX-SLAVE Colton Street John Henry Gibson was born a slave, many years ago, in Scott County, N.C. His old master, John Henry Bidding, was a wealthy farmer; he also owned the hotel, or rooming house. When court was in session the “higher ups” would come to this house, and stay until the court affairs were settled. Mr. Bidding, who was very kind to his slaves, died when John Gibson was very young. All slaves and other property passed on to the son, Joseph Bidding, who in turn was as kind as his father had been. Gibson’s father belonged to General Lee Gibson, who was a neighboring farmer. He saw and met Miss Elizabeth Bidding’s maid; they liked each other so very much, Miss Elizabeth bought him from General Gibson, and let him have her maid as his wife. The wife lived only a short time, leaving a little boy. After the Civil war, a white man, by the name of Luster, was comming to Ohio, brought John Gibson with him. They came to Indianapolis, and Gibson liked it so well, he decided to remain; Mr. Luster told him if he ever became dissatisfied to come on to Ohio to him, but he remained in Indianapolis until 1872, then went back south, married, came back, and made Indianapolis his home. Interviewer’s Comment Mr. Gibson is very old, but does not...

Slave Narrative of John W. Fields

Interviewer: Cecil Miller Person Interviewed: John W. Fields Location: Lafayette, Indiana Place of Birth: Owensburg, KY Date of Birth: March 27, 1848 Age: 89 Place of Residence: N. 20th St., Lafayette, Indiana Cecil C. Miller Dist. #3 Tippecanoe Co. INTERVIEW WITH MR. JOHN W. FIELDS, EX-SLAVE OF CIVIL WAR PERIOD September 17, 1937 John W. Fields, 2120 North Twentieth Street, Lafayette, Indiana, now employed as a domestic by Judge Burnett is a typical example of a fine colored gentleman, who, despite his lowly birth and adverse circumstances, has labored and economized until he has acquired a respected place in his home community. He is the owner of three properties; un-mortgaged, and is a member of the colored Baptist Church of Lafayette. As will later be seen his life has been one of constant effort to better himself spiritually and physically. He is a fine example of a man who has lived a morally and physically clean life. But, as for his life, I will let Mr. Fields speak for himself: “My name is John W. Fields and I’m eighty-nine (89) years old. I was born March 27, 1848 in Owensburg, Ky. That’s 115 miles below Louisville, Ky. There was 11 other children besides myself in my family. When I was six years old, all of us children were taken from my parents, because my master died and his estate had to be settled. We slaves were divided by this method. Three disinterested persons were chosen to come to the plantation and together they wrote the names of the different heirs on a few slips of paper. These slips were...

Slave Narrative of Sarah C. Colbert

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Sarah Colbert Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: Allen County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1855 Place of Residence: 1505 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. SARAH COLBERT-EX-SLAVE 1505 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Mrs. Sarah Carpenter Colbert was born in Allen County, Kentucky in 1855. She was owned by Leige Carpenter, a farmer. Her father, Isaac Carpenter was the grandson of his master, Leige Carpenter, who was very kind to him. Isaac worked on the farm until the old master’s death. He was then sold to Jim McFarland in Frankfort Kentucky. Jim’s wife was very mean to the slaves, whipped them regularly every morning to start the day right. One morning after a severe beating, Isaac met an old slave, who asked him why he let his mistress beat him so much. Isaac laughed and asked him what he could do about it. The old man told him if he would bite her foot, the next time she knocked him down, she would stop beating him and perhaps sell him. The next morning he was getting his regular beating, he willingly fell to the floor, grabbed his mistress’ foot, bit her very hard. She tried very hard to pull away from him, he held on still biting, she ran around in the room, Isaac still holding on. Finally, she stopped beating him and never attempted to strike him again. The next week he was put on the block, being a very good worker and a very strong man,...
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