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Biography of Almon S. Senter

An eventful career was that of Colonel Almon S. Senter, who for some years figured conspicuously in connection with the mercantile and official interests of Lincoln County. At the time of his death, March 6, 1899, he was serving as district-court clerk and ex-officio auditor and recorder of Lincoln County, and he was also an enterprising and prominent merchant of Shoshone. A native of the old Granite state, he was born February 18, 1845, and is a representative of one of the old and honored families of New Hampshire, of English descent. His ancestors were early settlers of Londonderry, that state, and one of his great-granduncles served in the Colonial army during the Revolutionary war. The grandfather and father of our subject, both of whom bore the name of Thomas Senter, were natives of New Hampshire, the latter born in Petersboro. He wedded Miss Mary C. Giddings, a native of Temple, New Hampshire, and also a descendant of one of the prominent colonial families. Mr. Senter was an industrious farmer, who followed agricultural pursuits throughout his entire life. Both he and his wife were Methodists in religious belief, and the father lived to be sixty-four years of age, while the mother departed this life in her forty-seventh year, leaving a family of eleven children, the eldest but seventeen years of age, the youngest only three months old. Colonel Senter was at that time a little lad of five summers. He was reared to manhood in Hudson, New Hampshire, was educated in the public schools, and when thirteen years of age began to earn his own living by working on...

Biography of Samuel Hadlock

SAMUEL HADLOCK. – The people of the Pacific coast at present belong to that time in the history of their states and society when they do the things that the after-time lovers to look back upon and scrutinize. They are full of restless energy, and experience all that falls to the lot of man. The old free days, when the country was new and towns were built, will ever be regarded by the populous and crowded future as the golden days of our history, – mixed with severe toil and deprivation alternating with abundance. Samuel Hadlock, who founded Port Hadlock, Washington, of which we give a partial view, is one of the men who belong to and have made this age. He was born in Hudson, New Hampshire, in 1829. Both his parents were New Englanders of old family; and life on the farm developed in our subject the nervous, muscular and mental force which were his by inheritance. In 1850, the year of his majority, he went out to St. Louis, and in 1852 was on the plains for Oregon with Captain Morgan’s train. He reached The Dalles in September, and leaving behind him the fields and valleys of the Columbia went gold hunting to Southern Oregon. He was as far south as Yreka before the new year, and endured great hardships in the way of sickness and well0nigh starvation. Flour was a dollar a pound. Making his escape the next spring with his pair of blankets on his shoulder, he went afoot to the vicinity of Portland, finding employment with a farmer. In 1854 he found more...

Biographical Sketch of Nathan R. Marshall

Nathan R. Marshall, the father of Mrs. Collins, was born in Hudson N.H., in 1792. He removed to Bible Hill when a boy of fourteen, and six years later married Abigail Hawks, daughter of Farrington and Sarah Knowlton Hawks. He was a man of education and an especially good accountant, as shown by his old account books, kept in a neat, clear hand. He held town offices at different periods, being a most intelligent and valued official. He and his wife reared ten children, three sons and seven daughters. Two of these died in infancy. Joshua P. Marshall, the eldest son, a man of good mental attainments, for more than forty years was a manufacturers’ agent for the sale of glassware. He always kept his residence in Bradford, but spent his winters during his later years in Florida, where he had large interests in orange groves. He died there in 1893, aged seventy-six years. Joseph Addison, another son of Nathan R. Marshall, was a farmer in his earlier life. Later he became the proprietor of a market in Boston, and subsequently, in company with his brother Joshua, established himself as a dealer in glassware. They were burned out in the big fire of 1872, but resumed business after a time, and continued in it until Joseph’s health failed. His home Boston, and he died at the age of fifty-nine. Farrington H. Marshall resides in Boston. He and Mrs. Collins are the only surviving members of the family. The Collins family are quite numerous, and hold frequent reunions in Amesbury,...

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