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Biographical Sketch of W. D. Martin

One half mile southeast from Harney is one of the finest small grain farms in the county. It consists of eighty acres of choice land and is well under cultivation. The improvements are of a quality and kind quite fitting such an estate and its owner is the subject of this article. Mr. Martin was about the first man to try raising grain in this locality and he has made a marked success in this direction. He raised in 1901 the largest crop of any one man in Harney county and he is classed as one of the leading agriculturists of middle Oregon. W. D. Martin was born in Walla Walla county, Washington, on February 13, 1865, being the son of John and Nancy (Owens) Martin. The parents came from the state of Iowa overland with ox teams direct to Walla Walla and the father took a ranch that joined Oregon, and within one hundred yards of the state line our subject was born. Soon after that event, the family removed to the Oregon side and dwelt in Umatilla county until 1885. W. D. was educated in the common schools there and grew up on a farm, developing both his mental and physical powers in a becoming manner to a western born son. In 1885 he came to Baker county, near North Powder and on June 8, of that year, he married Miss Leorah, daughter of Jason and Margaret Wyatt, who were pioneers from the state of Indiana to Baker county in 1876. Mrs. Martin was born in Indiana. They removed to Walla Walla county and thence in 1891...

Biographical Sketch of George M. Stanclift

Surely the subject of this review has passed the various stages of all kinds of pioneer work, with its hardships, deprivations and dangers, while he has met each point with a calm determination to overcome and make his way through it all, which he has done in a most commendable manner, being now one of the stanch and upright men of Harney and one of its well-to-do citizens, having his home on one of the finest pieces of soil in central Oregon, the same being one hundred and fifty-three acre, one mile north from Burns, which forms the family home and is a good dividend producer. Mr. Stanclift was born in Erie county, New York, on April 25, 1837, being the son of Reuben and Elvira (Adams) Stanclift. At the age of fifteen he went with the family to Cass county, Michigan, and thence to Berrien county, where his mother died. In February, 1855, he came via New York and Panama to San Francisco, crossing the Isthmus with the first through passenger train. On the sea they encountered great storms that made the passage unpleasant. Upon landing in California he went to the Poor creek country, and thence to Plumas county and mined. Yuba county he later took up mining and dairying together and in the spring of 1860 he went to the vicinity of Virginia City. But the second winter there his partner was killed by the Indians, and all the stock driven off by them, entailing a loss upon Mr. Stanclift of seven thousand dollars. He went to work for wages again and on January 8, 1867,...

Biographical Sketch of James T. Simmons

Among the arrivals in Harney county who have come from native places to identify themselves with this progressive region, we must not fail to mention the gentleman whose name is at the head of this article and who has wrought here with untiring energy and unflagging zeal in the line of stock raising, and in addition now handles the mail and stage line from Diamond to Andrews. Mr. Simmons was born in Berryville, Arkansas, on March 22, 1862, being the son of Isaac and Sarah Simmons. He grew up on a farm and received his education from the public schools and in 1877 went to Millville, California, afterward returning to Arkansas. It was in 1888 that he came to the Harney valley, and here at the Narrows, on January 1, 1893, he married Mrs. Mary A. Burneson, daughter of Albert and Mary Hembree, who are mentioned in this volume. To this happy union there were born two children, Alice Esma and Rose Alliene. By her former marriage Mrs. Simmons had two children, Charles Albert and Ira D. P. Mr. Simmons engaged in raising stock and handles the stage line in addition. His father was a captain in the Union army and died soon after the war was over. Mr. Simmons is a man of sound principles and has won friends in his walk, being well known and respected by...

Biography of Melvin Fenwick

A true pioneer, a man of exemplary standing and life, possessed of capabilities and qualities of worth, the estimable gentleman of whom we now speak, is entitled to representation in the volume of Harney county’s history. His parents, Alexander and Nancy (Long) Fenwick, were natives to Kentucky, and his father crossed the plains to California in 1849. He was a blacksmith and carried his tools on a pack horse and wrought at his trade, shoeing horses, and so forth, all the way. In 1851 he returned via Panama, and with his wife and seven children he came in 1852 to Amador county, California. There our subject was born on May 18, 1855, being the ninth child. The family removed to Napa county in 1858, and in August, 1863, came thence to Lane county, Oregon. There the father remained until his death in 1883. It was in February of that year that Melvin came to the Harney valley. He entered land at his present home place four miles north from Burns, and has engaged in farming and raising stock there since that time, being favored with abundant success on account of his industry and perseverance. He now owns five hundred acres of land, well improved and skillfully tilled. He formerly handled hogs, but is now devoting his attention to cattle mostly. When Mr. Fenwick came here there was but one house where Burns now stands, and settlers were very few in the country. Bacon cost thirty-five cents per pound and flour ten cents. Mr. Fenwick put up the first barbed wire fence in the valley, the year being 1884 when...

Biographical Sketch of N. E. Duncan

It is with pleasure that we are enabled to write concerning the estimable gentleman whose name is at the head of this article, since he has been one of the potent factors in the development of Harney county, has manifested wisdom and enterprise in all his ways here, has labored as a true pioneer in many other sections of the country and has always manifested the same unswerving integrity, moral uprightness and sound principles, having sustained a reputation as an exceptionally reliable man, and ever arraigned on the side of right. Mr. Duncan was born in Williamson county, Illinois, on March 27, 1838, being the son of Dudley W. and Elizabeth Duncan. On April 16, 1859, Mr. Duncan started to New Orleans on the Panama route to California. He had an adventurous spirit and was ready to grapple with the hard problems of pioneer life and has since proved himself of the right kind of stuff. He stopped five days on the way, at Havana, and then landed in San Francisco on May 16. He worked for wages until the fall of 1861, then went by steamer to Portland, Oregon. On April 16, 1863, he started to Auburn, Baker county, arriving there on the 16th of May, and for fifteen years he was numbered with the hardy and worthy miners of that vicinity. It was 1878 that he came to upper Willow creek and took up ranching. In 1884 he came thence to the vicinity of Drewsey, and there engaged in farming and stock raising. He took raw land, two hundred and forty acres, and made of it a fine...

Biographical Sketch of Martin V. Smith

A veritable pioneer of the pioneers is Mr. Smith, having come to the Pacific coast in the early fifties and continued here in worthy labors in various lines since that time, ever displaying the same courage, capabilities, tenacity of purpose, and integrity, that have made the pioneers such a noble class of people. Mr. Smith was born in Kennebec county, Maine, on January 10, 1833, being the son of James and Hannah Smith, natives also of Maine, the father being born near Portland. His death also occurred in that state. Martin V. received a good schooling and remained with his parents until 1853, when he went to New York and stepped aboard of one of the Vanderbilt ships, that took him to Nicaragua, whence he went to San Francisco and soon we see him in the mines delving with the vigor and strength of young manhood for the hidden gold. Five years he labored there and then went to Yuba county and took up farming and raising stock. The hard winter of 1861-62 killed all his stock and he went to freighting from Marysville to various points in California and Nevada. In 1873 he went to Butte County and settled on one of Judge O. C. Pratt’s grants and went to farming. His landlord was the first territorial governor of California. Mr. Smith was successful in this venture and continued until 1880, when he went to the foot hills in Butte county and engaged in gardening and fruit raising until 1884. Then he freighted until 1886 and came overland to Silver Creek, Harney county. He entered land and took...

Biographical Sketch of George W. Page

Among the leading stockmen of the country, the subject of this article also stands with the prominent and substantial citizens of the county of Harney and is one of the real pioneers of this section, being also a westerner by birth. He owns Sonoma county, California, as his native place and February 13, 1858, is the date thereof. His parents were Joseph W. and Nancy (Johnson) Page. In 1867 they all came overland to Lane county, Oregon. The father had been operating a large dairy in California, and in Oregon he devoted his attention to farming, also raised stock. In 1884 our subject came to Harney county and operated a sawmill. After this he roved about in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon and in 1893 came to Harney county and engaged in the sheep business, entering into partnership with G. W. Bartlett. Later he sold out and then went into partnership with James Campbell. They divided up in 1901 and Mr. Page sold one-third interest to his brother Edward N., and his nephew, Claud Hendricks. They own several thousand head of sheep and are prosperous in this business, being skilled in handling them. Mr. Page is a member of the I. O. O. F., Drewsey Lodge, No. 147. He is a man of public spirit, has always labored for the advancement of the county and is one of the promoters of substantial...

Biographical Sketch of Isadore L. Poujade

This prominent citizen and leading stockman of Harney county is one of the men who deserves to be accorded space in the history of the county because of his worth, because of his uprightness, integrity and probity, and because of the excellent work that he has accomplished in the upbuilding and progress of the county. Mr. Poujade was born in Marion county, Oregon, on December 8, 1857, being the son of Andrew and Matilda (Clinger) Poujade. At the age of fifteen he went to Jackson county with his parents, with whom he resided until 1880. He gained his education in these places and also a wealth of excellent training in the practical walks of life and in raising stock and in farming. In 1880 he came to Harney valley and engaged as foreman for Todhunter & Devine. Six years were spent in this responsible position, and then he engaged in partnership with Charles W. Jones, in the stock business. They purchased what is known as the Cow creek ranch. This estate consists of eight hundred acres of fine meadow land, six miles east from Harney, and is improved with a fine dwelling of twelve rooms, good shop, barns, corralls, fences and all implements for handling a first-class stock and hay ranch. After the death of Mr. Jones Mr. Poujade purchased all the stock, but owns the ranch in partnership with Mrs. Jones, the widow of his late partner. Mr. Poujade is one of the prosperous stockmen of the county, and has demonstrated his ability to so conduct the affairs of business that a crowning success is his to enjoy....

Biographical Sketch of Wallace McClain

This well-known and representative business man and patriotic citizen of Harney county is one of the firm of McClain & Biggs, liverymen and dealers in horses and mules in Burns, where their stables are, being also owners of a fine stock ranch. Our subject was born in Scotland county, Missouri, on September 16, 1854, being the son of Martin and Sarah (Childers) McClain. The father was in the confederate army and in the battle of Pea Ridge lost his right arm. He served under Price. In 1866 the family removed to Schuyler county and our subject was educated in these two localities and he remained with his parents until 1875, when he went to Waterloo, Iowa, and took up the grocery business. In 1877 he went to Elk City, Kansas, and the next year he came to San Francisco, and thence by steamer, George M. Elder, to Portland and soon he was in Linn county. He was engaged in a flouring mill until 1881 and then came to Summerville, Union county, and freighted from Umatilla to Idaho. It was 1883 when he came to the Silvies valley, engaging with Lux & Miller, stockmen. He took a train of twenty-one cars of cattle to Chicago and another to Omaha and was foreman of the company until he met with an accident of falling under a wagon, which unfitted him for the arduous labors of a stock foreman. This was 1886, and he went into business in Drewsey and in 1889 Mr. McClain married Mrs. Eva (Robertson) Whittle and then moved to Umatilla county. He took up the business of making...

Biographical Sketch of Jackson A. Bartlett

This well known and representative business man of the town of Drewsey has a fine hotel, where he does a thriving business and also a large livery and feed stable, being a man of excellent capabilities and one of the prominent figures in this part of Harney county. He was born in Owen county, Indiana, on August 31, 1847, the son of James and Sarah (Alexander) Bartlett. He was reared on a farm and gained his education from the public schools of the vicinity and when he heard the call for troops in the times of fratricidal strife he enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Company B. He was largely on post puty, being in Louisville, Kentucky; Nashville, Tennessee; and Decatur, Alabama. The date of his enlistment was February 14, 1865, and his honorable discharge occurred in October, 1865. He at once returned to his home in Indiana. In 1868 he migrated to Scotland county, Missouri, and there on December 25, 1870, occurred his marriage with Miss Arminta J., daughter of William and Margaret Myers. He followed farming there until 1887, and then with his family of wife and seven children he made the trip across the country to Union county, Oregon. The following year he came to the agency, in the vicinity of Beulah, Malheur county, entered a homestead, improved it and settled to raising stock. It was in 1896 that he came to Drewsey and bought a hotel and embarked in that business. He did a good business from the start, but in 1899 the entire property was destroyed by fire. He immediately...
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