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Biography of William S. McNeill

William S. McNeill was born in Hardy county, Virginia, November 1, 1837. His parents moved to this county in 1855, and his father, John H. McNeill, was president of the first fair held in this county in 1856, and had at that time the only herd of Short-Horn Durham cattle in northwest Missouri. When the war began his father raised a company of cavalry for the Confederate army, and died November 11, 1864, from a wound received in the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia, while at the head of his company, known as the Partisan Rangers. The command then fell to his son Jesse, brother of William S. McNeill, who with sixty men executed one of the most daring feats of the late war. Going into the Union lines at Cumberland, in Maryland, where there were 10,000 Union soldiers, he went to the hotel where Generals Crook and Kelley were sleeping, went to to their rooms, took them prisoners, and got them safe within his own lines. He rode ninety miles in twenty-four hours in performing the deed. William S. McNeill was educated in the common schools, supplemented by a ten months term at the State University, at Columbia, Missouri. He enlisted at the beginning of the war in his father’s company and served eight months, then returned home and served eight months in the Enrolled State Militia. In 1875 he made a trip to Oregon and the northwestern Territories. He is now one of Daviess county’s best sheep raisers, having given his attention to the husbandry of sheep for several years. In the summer of 1858 he was on the...

Biography of the See Family

The See family is of German origin. Three brothers, Adam, George, and Michael, with seven sisters, were raised in Hardy Co., Va. Their father, George, and a Negro man were all killed by lightning while stacking hay. The girls married and settled in Kentucky and Ohio. Adam was a prominent lawyer, and lived and died in Virginia. Michael married Catharine Baker, of Hardy Co., Va., by whom he had Mary, Elizabeth, Adam C , Barbara, Anthony, Jacob, John, Solomon, and Noah. Mr. See was a soldier of the war of 1812. He settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1837. His daughter Elizabeth married Hugh Hart, who settled in Montgomery County in 1839. Barbary married Thomas McCleary, who settled in Montgomery County in 1810 Jacob married Rachel Morrison, and settled in Montgomery County in 1837. He has been Justice of the Peace and Deputy Sheriff, and is now the Representative of his County in the State Legislature. He was also a prominent member and officer of the Evanix Society, in Danville. Mr. See is very fond of fine stock, and in 1871 he raised eighteen hogs that averaged from 700 to 1000 pounds each. He took them to St. Louis, had them made into bacon, and sent the hams to Memphis, Tenn. But they were shipped hack, with a statement from the commission merchant that they were not buying horse hams. Mr. See also raised, and still has in his possession, the largest ox in the world. He has made a good deal of money by exhibiting this mammoth brute in various parts of the United States, and everywhere he...

Biography of John Cravens

John Cravens, son of Dr. Joseph and Mary Cravens, was born in Harrisonburg, Rockingham county, Virginia, October 28, 1797, where he was reared and educated. He began the study of medicine under his father,, when in his nineteenth year, and began practice some six years later. After practicing with his father two years, he removed to Hardy county, Virginia now West Virginia, and began practice at Petersburg, but only remained one year, when he removed to Pendleton county, opened an office in Franklin, the county seat, and was an active practitioner in that county for ten years. In 1837 he removed to Missouri, and settled near Miami, where he lived eighteen months, and during that time gave up the practice of his profession. At the expiration of the time mentioned he changed his place of residence to Daviess county, locating near Gallatin in the spring of 1839, where he pursued farming and continued the practice of his profession until 1850, then moved to Gallatin, and gave his attention exclusively to his increasing practice. In 1857 he returned to his farm, one mile northwest of Gallatin, where he now lives. He continued the practice of medicine until the close of the war, when owing to his advanced age and impaired hearing,. he gave up practice entirely, devoting his attention to his farm. In 1842 he was elected presiding justice of the County Court, holding the office until 1846, and subsequently was twice elected to the same office. In 1861 he was appointed brigade-surgeon in the Confederate service under Gen. William Y. Slack, and was with that officer until his death...

Biography of Salem L. Ketterman

Salem L. Ketterman, one of the oldest residents of the village of St. Joseph, has been there continuously for forty-four years. He has all the time been closely associated with its welfare and has lived to see many changes recorded in the history of Champaign County. The only other man still living in St. Joseph who was there when he first settled is Mr. T. Jefferson Wooden. Mr. Ketterman is a native of the old State of Virginia, having been born in Hardy County, March 19, 1847, a son of John and Belinda (Full) Ketterman. His parents were also natives of Virginia and of German descent. The first American Ketterman was Christopher, who settled in Virginia in 1760. A son of this immigrant, Daniel Ketterman, a great-uncle of Salem L., was a Revolutionary soldier and was present at the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown, the closing scene of the war for independence. John and Belinda Ketterman had only two children, Salem and Hannah J., Salem being the older. The mother died when Salem was a child and the father married again, and altogether had seven children, two sons and five daughters. Salem L. Ketterman received his first advantages in the district schools of Virginia. He was ten years of age when, in 1857, his father came to Champaign County and he completed his education while living on the paternal farm in St. Joseph Township. He grew up here, made the best of his early advantages, and for twelve years was one of the successful teachers of the county. In 1875, at the age of twenty-eight, Mr. Ketterman married Miss...

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