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Biographical Sketch of Dr. John Martin

John Martin was born in Morgan county, Kentucky, February 15, 1819, and is the son of Lewis Martin, a native of Kentucky. Our subject moved with his parents to Lawrence county, Tennessee, while an infant, and lived there during fifteen years, and there received the greater part of his education. From Tennessee he moved to Illinois, and was married in Hancock county, that State, September 8, 1839. He came to this State in 1845 and has lived in various counties of Missouri since, engaged in the practice of medicine and other branches of business. He came to Jamesport about ten years ago and has built up an extensive and profitable business in grain and lumber. Dr. Martin was surgeon of the Seventh Regiment of Missouri Volunteers for a time during the Civil War. He was elected to a seat in the State Senate from Sullivan county, in 1865, by a majority of her citizens, but the election returns were so handled and such a number of voters disfranchised and their votes rejected that he was not allowed to take his seat. He has eight children: Martin T., Harriet, Edmund B., A. S., Vic., Isaiah, F. L., and Philanda. Dr. and Mrs. Martin are members of the Baptist Church. He is, also, a member of Jamesport Lodge No. 201, A. F. & A. M. He is well esteemed by all, and in politics is a...

Biography of John Davis

John Davis, of Jonesburg, familiarly known as “Uncle John,” is the oldest son of the late Thomas Davis, of Shenandoah Co., Va. John was born October 30, 1791, in Shenandoah County, and is now nearly 85 years of age. When he was about sixteen his parents removed to Bourbon Co., Ky., and when the war of 1812 began, he enlisted in the army and served under Generals Winchester and Payne. He was stationed at Forts Wayne and Laramie, in Ohio, for some time. In 1820 he came to Missouri, and stopped a short time in St. Louis, which then had only one principal street, and most of the houses were made of square posts set upright, with the spaces between filled with straw and mud, the chimneys being built of the same material. The court house was surrounded by a post-and-rail fence, and young Davis was sitting on this fence when the announcement was made that the Territory of Missouri had become a State. From St. Louis Mr. Davis went to Pike County, and settled in Clarksville, where he lived forty-six years. In those days rattlesnakes were much more abundant than they are now, and the old pioneers would occasionally go on “snaking” frolics. They always came back vomiting from the effects of the poisonous smell of the snakes. On one occasion Mr. Davis and his neighbors went to a knob near Clarksville, and killed seven hundred rattlesnakes in one day. This is a pretty large snake story, but it is nevertheless true. Mr. Davis had failed in business in Kentucky before his removal to Missouri, but he worked...

Biography of Enos Fitterer

Enos Fitterer was born in Baden, Germany, July 28, 1835, and lived in his native land until 1846, when his parents emigrated to America. They settled on a farm in Butler county, Ohio, and there the subject of this sketch lived and grew to manhood. In 1856 he went to Hamilton, Ohio, to learn the baker’s trade with Messrs. Nutts & Sivers, remained with them some fifteen months, and then located in Carthage, Hancock county, Illinois, where he established himself in the bakery business and carried it on until 1861. In that year he joined the Union army, enlisting in. Company B, Thirty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served during the war, participating in the battles of Pittsburgh Landing, Hatchie River, and numerous skirmishes; and was with Sherman in his famous “March through Georgia, from Atlanta to the sea.” He was mustered out of the service at Leavenworth, Kansas, in September, 1865, and received his honorable discharge at Springfield, Illinois. From Springfield he went to Trenton, Missouri, the following November, and there, in connection with C. A. Hoffman, opened a bakery and grocery establishment, under the firm name of Hoffman & Fitterer. This firm continued business until 1867, when Mr. Hoffman retired, and Mr. Fitterer continued to carry on the business until 1873, when his brother became associated with him, under the name and style of Fitterer & Bro., and they remained in partnership until the following fall, then sold out to Messrs. Hyde & Crandall. He was employed working at his trade from that time until 1877, when he removed to Gallatin and established himself in the bakery and...

Biographical Sketch of Edmond H. Madison

Edmond H. Madison, of Wichita, who died while serving his third term in Congress, was of the younger generation of the energetic and able members of the bench and bar in Kansas. He was born at Plymouth, Hancock County, Illinois, December 18, 1865, educated in the common schools and at the age of eighteen years began teaching. In 1885 he went to Wichita, Kansas, where he studied law in the office of G. W. C. Jones; and in 1888 was admitted to the bar. The same year he was elected county attorney of Ford County, which office he held for two terms. On January 1, 1900, he was appointed judge of the Thirty-first Judicial District and served in that capacity until September 17, 1906, when he resigned to enter the race for Congress. He was elected as the representative of the Seventh Congressional District that year, re-elected in 1908 and again in 1910, but died suddenly from apoplexy while seated at the breakfast table on the morning of September 18, 1911, before completing his third term. While in Congress Mr. Madison was a stanch supporter of President Roosevelt’s policies and was a member of the committee to settle the Ballinger-Pinehot eontroversy. He was president of the Kansas League of Republican Clubs in 1896-97, was a active member of the Sons of Veterans; was frequently called upon to serve as delegate to conventions, and his services were in great demand as a campaign...

Biography of Raymond Griffin Barnett

Raymond Griffin Barnett, who had the well earned title of captain of the American army in the World war and who is now engaged in the practice of law in Kansas City, was born at Carthage, Hancock county, Illinois, October 8, 1882, and is a son of Fred P. and Adele (Griffin) Barnett, the former a native of Missouri and the latter of Illinois. The father went from this state to Iowa and afterward returned to Kansas City. He is by profession a court reporter and is now the vice president of the Shorthand Reporting Company, with offices in the Temple building of Kansas City. To him and his wife were born three children but one has passed away, the surviving daughter being Edith Barnett. After completing a course in the Central high school of Kansas City, Raymond G. Barnett attended the University of Missouri and then went to the coast, where he entered the Stanford University of California, winning his Bachelor of Arts degree as a member of the class of 1905. Subsequently he studied law there and in 1906 was admitted to the bar of Kansas City, where he has since engaged in practice. He is thorough in his work, energetic in his tasks and capable in handling the legal business entrusted to his care. His professional career is characterized by the thorough preparation of his cases and he is preeminently a business man’s lawyer. He belongs to the Kansas City and Missouri State Bar Associations. In 1918 Mr. Barnett was married to Miss Martha Jones, daughter of R. B. Jones, a prominent insurance man of Kansas...

Biographical Sketch of Noble L. Prentis

Noble L. Prentis, a leading Kansas editor for twenty-one years, and for the last decade of his life identified with the Kansas City Star, was born on April 8, 1839, in a log cabin three miles from Mount Sterling, Brown County, Illinois. His parents were natives of Vermont, descended from English settlers, and on both sides of the family came of brave Revolutionary stock. His parents died at Warsaw, Illinois, of cholera during the epidemic of 1849, leaving him an orphan at the age of ten years. He went to live with an uncle in Vermont and remained there until he was eighteen, when he moved to Connecticut and served an apprenticeship at the printer’s trade. He then came west and worked for a time in a newspaper office at Carthage, Illinois. At the opening of the Civil war he enlisted as a private in the Sixteenth Illinois Infantry and served four years, when he was honorably discharged. He published a paper at Alexandria, Missouri, until Capt. Henry King of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat induced him to come to Topeka in 1869 and assist him on the Record. During the succeeding eight years he was engaged on the Junction City Union and the Topeka Commonwealth, and about 1877 began to work on the Atchison Champion. He remained with that paper during Colonel Martin’s term as governor and in 1888 took charge of the Newton Republican. In 1890 he accepted a position on the editorial staff of the Kansas City Star, which he held until his death. In 1877 he went to Europe, and his book, “A Kansan Abroad,” was...

Biography of Holmes Dysinger, Rev.

Rev. Holmes Dysinger has for the past twelve years been connected with the Western Theological Seminary of the Lutheran Church at Atchison, and since 1910 had been dean of the seminary. He had spent more than thirty years in the work of the church as a minister and as an educator, and had been connected with prominent schools and pastorates in nearly all parts of the country. Mr. Dysinger is of an old Pennsylvania family and was born at Mifflin, that state, March 26, 1853. The Dysingers’ original home was in Southern Germany. They came across the ocean and settled in Pennsylvania not long after William Penn planted his colony there. Joseph Dysinger, father of Rev. Dr. Dysinger, was born in Juniata County, Pennsylvania, in 1824, and for seventy years was a resident of Walker Township in that county. In early years he followed contracting but later was a farmer. He finally retired to Mifflin and died in that Pennsylvania city in November, 1904. Politleally he was a democrat and a very active member of the Lutheran Church. Joseph Dysinger married Mary A. Patterson, who was born in Walker Township, Juniata County, near Mifflin, in 1831. She is now living at the venerable age of eighty-six, at Atchison. A brief record of the seven children is: Austin, who was a teacher and died at Ottawa, Illinois, in January, 1905; Holmes; George W., a practicing dentist at Minneapolis, Minnesota; James H., a teacher living at Los Angeles, California; William S., pastor of the First Lutheran Church at Los Angeles; Sarah Catherine, who died in infancy; and Samuel P., manager of...

Biographical Sketch of Henry King

It is not the rule for men to follow the trade or profession to which they are best adapted and to achieve the dominant ambition of their lives. This inclination and result can in absolute truth be said of Capt. Henry King. He learned the printer’s trade because the attraction was irresistible, and advanced from the composing room and hand press to the editorial desk because he must have foreseen the work he was best fitted to do. His taste and capacity were for writing, a natural force impelling him to reduce the workings of his mind to written form–and it was real writing, for he never used a stenographer or typewriter, and his “copy” was the perfection of chirography. As a young man he published and edited a weekly newspaper at his home town, LaHarpe, Illinois. This work was interrupted by a four years’ service in the army in 1861-65. Returning from the army, he engaged in a profitless mercantile business, and studied law, but all the time there was a ceaseless call to write, and he was soon working on the Daily Whig, at Quincy, Illinois, of which he became editor. Later, in 1869, he removed to Topeka, where in turn he edited the State Record, the Commonwealth and the Capital. From the latter post he went to the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, in 1883, first as contributing editor, and for the last eighteen years of his life as managing editor. Conducting a metropolitan newapaper gave him the broad field for which he had prepared himself, and in which he gained a reputation that was conspicuous and a fame...

Biography of James P. Stephens

JAMES P. STEPHENS. – This original owner of a large portion of the townsite of East Portland, Oregon, was born in 1806 in Virginia, and removed to Indiana when but a boy of eight, and came still farther west to Hancock County, Illinois, in1832. In 1830 he married Miss Elizabeth Walker of Ohio, and passed on to Missouri, and in 1843 made preparations to come to Oregon. Failing, however, to reach the rendezvous in time, the journey was postponed until the next year. Crossing the plains in 1844, he endured the hardships of that toilsome year, and reached Oregon City as late as December 24th. The year following he bought a squatters right to the site of East Portland, which was held by Doctor McLoughlin as administrator of one Porier, a Frenchman. Living there and working at cooperage for the Hudson’s Bay Company, Mr. Stephens availed himself of the Donation land law to secure his claim, thereby acquiring a property which stood him in stead during all his vicissitudes. As early as 1846 he established a ferry between East and West Portland, using a simple flatboat propelled with oars, and with this passed the few horsemen and occasional teams that traveled in those days to and fro. In that year he also laid out the city of East Portland. In 1848 he, with all the rest of the Oregonians, tried his luck in California. Projecting a large business plan, he bought a site for a bridge across the American river, making the structure of hewed timbers, some of which were ninety-five feet long, set upon heavy buttresses. An ox-team...

Biography of David S. Lamme

The history of the pioneer settlement of Payette would be incomplete without the record of this gentleman, who from the earliest founding of the town has been a prominent factor in its substantial growth and improvement. When Idaho was cut off from the advantages and comforts of the east by the long, hot stretches of sand and the high mountains, he made his way across the plains, braving all the trials and hardships of pioneer life in order to make a home in the northwest rich in its resources, vet unclaimed from the dominion of the red men. Mr. Lamme is a native of Hancock County, Illinois, born February 11, 1842, and is of French and Irish descent. The Lammes were of French origin, and at an early period in the history of the east crossed the Atlantic. Representatives of the name participated in many of the leading events mentioned in the annals of the country, and in the Revolutionary war they aided in the struggle for independence. Jonathan Lamme, father of our subject, was born in Sangamon County, Illinois, and married Lydia Hamilton. One of her ancestors also was a Revolutionary hero, and her family is of Irish lineage. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lamme were born six children, of whom four sons and a daughter are living. Both parents died when about forty-five years of age, and the children were left to make their own way in the world. David S. Lamme spent the days of his boy-hood and youth in the County of his nativity, and provided for his own livelihood by working as a farm hand...
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