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Biography of Peter VanBibber

Peter and Isaac VanBibber, of Holland, came to America and settled in Botetourt Co., Va., previous to the revolution. Peter married Marguety Bounds, and they had Peter, Jr., Jesse, Jacob, James, Joseph, Matthias, Nancy, Sophronia, Ellen, and Olive. James married Jane Irvine, and settled in St. Charles County in 1803. He was Coroner at the time William Hays was killed by his son-in-law, James Davis. In 1817 he removed to Callaway County, and settled on the Auxvasse. His children were Joseph, Irvine, Frances. Lucinda, Melissa, Daniel and Minerva. Joseph was a surveyor and made the government surveys in range eight, west of the fifth principal meridian. Olive VanBibber married Nathan Boone. Isaac VanBibber, Brother of Peter, was Captain of a company in the battle of Point Pleasant, in 1774, and was killed there. He left, a widow and four children John, Peter, Isaac and Rebecca. John and Peter married and settled in Powell’s Valley, East Tennessee. Isaac was born in Greenbriar Co., Va., October 20, 1771, and was only two and a half years old when his father was killed. He was adopted and raised by Colonel Daniel Boone, and at the early age of thirteen years acted as a scout against the Indians in Virginia. In 1800 he came to Missouri with Nathan Boone, and settled first in Darst’s Bottom. During the Indian war he was Major of the militia under Col. Daniel M. Boone. He was married in 1797 to Susan Hays. In 1851 he settled at Loutre Lick, now in Montgomery County. The place was first settled by Thomas Massey, in 1813. The land was a...

Biographical Sketch of William S. Slavens

William S. Slavens was born in Greenbriar Co., Va., September 15, 1887. He was married five times; first to Anna Hawkins, by whom he had three children, second to Mary Riggs, third to Elizabeth Elsbury, by whom he had seven children, fourth to the widow Thomas, whose maiden name was Rebecca Stanley, by whom he had two children; and fifth to the widow Meyers, whose maiden name was Paulina Hunt. Mr. Slavens settled in Montgomery, on Brush Creek, in 1820, and removed to near Middletown in 1829. He owned part of the land that Middletown was built upon. Mr. Slavens came to Missouri in company with his brother Thomas and a Mr. McCarta, in a little horse cart. Their stock consisted of one cow, the property of William Slavens, which they drove before them and for which he was offered forty acres of land within the present limits of St. Louis; but thought his cow was worth more than the land, and kept her. Mr. Slavens had $640 in money, which he loaned to Mr. McCarter, who invested it in Irish potatoes, and planted them on ten acres of land in Illinois. The potato crop was a failure, and the money was never repaid. The names of Mr. Slavens’ children were James H., Sarah, Isabella, Lydia A., Martha A., Aaron, William N., Henry B., Euphemia, Louisa, Elizabeth, and Mary S. The youngest son, now in his 47th year, has sixteen children and ten...

Biographical Sketch of Andrew Hunter

This name in German is Yager, but when translated it means Hunter. Andrew Hunter, and his wife, of Germany, came to America and settled in Greenbriar County, Virginia, where they had John, Tobias, Philip, William, Peter, Elizabeth, and Sarah. Peter, who changed the family name from Yager to Hunter, married Margaret Wood, and settled in North Carolina in 1816, and in 1819 he and his family and his two sisters, Sarah and Elizabeth, came to Missouri and settled in Montgomery County. The change of the name was the cause of the family losing a large estate in Germany, as the heirs could not be traced after the change was made. Peter’s children were James, Robert, Andrew, Ephraim, William, John N., Neson, Nancy, and Elmira. All married and lived in Montgomery...

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