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Biography of Elias W. Pike

Elias W. Pike, of Goshen, an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature and a veteran of the Civil War, was born in this town, October 12, 1838, son of Wilson S. and Julia G. (Martin) Pike. His grandfather, Jarvis Pike, who resided in Newport, N.H., was a prosperous farmer. Wilson S. Pike, who was reared to farm life in Newport, removed when about twenty-one years old to Goshen, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits for the greater part of his active period, and died in September, 1866. The maiden name of his first wife was Harriett Currier. Her five children by him were: Mary, now the widow of Ezekiel Bates, late of Cohasset, Mass.; Mahala, the widow of James Homer, who was formerly in the livery business in Boston; Lodema, the wife of William Morgan, a retired jeweller of Providence, R.I.; Julia, who died in 1849; and Cyrus F., born in 1833, who died at the age of twenty-two years. Wilson S. Pike’s second marriage was contracted with Julia G. Martin, of Alexandria, N.H., who became the mother of eight children. These were: Elias W., the subject of this sketch; William Henry; Martha, Ezra G., Harriet, and James Homer, who are deceased; Ruth G., the wife of Eben A. Purington, a prosperous farmer and a Selectman of Goshen; and Ezra G. (second), who married Emma L. Purington, and is engaged in agricultural pursuits in this town. Mrs. Wilson S. Pike is still living, and resides in Goshen. Elias W. Pike was educated in the district schools and at the New London Academy. He was engaged in farming until...

Biography of Harvey Graves McIntire, M.D.

Harvey Graves McIntire, M.D., formerly one of the leading physicians of Concord, was born in Lyndeboro, N.H., July 2, 1824, son of Elias and Elizabeth (Buxton) McIntire. Elias McIntire, son of Elias, Sr., and Bethiah (Hayward) McIntire, was a native of Reading, Mass., and belonged to one of the oldest families of that town. Removing to New Hampshire after marriage, he lived for a time in Amherst, and then settled in Lyndeboro. He followed the occupation of farmer throughout his active period, and was ninety-six years old when he died in Lyndeboro. His wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Stephen and Phebe (Stearns) Buxton, of Reading, Mass., bore him six children. The only one now living is Deacon Nathaniel McIntire, of Lyndeboro. Harvey G. McIntire, the youngest of the family, received his education in the district schools and at the academy of Francestown. After graduating from the latter institution, he decided to enter upon the medical profession. In accordance with this design he became a pupil, first, of Dr. Campbell, of Francestown and subsequently of Dr. Elliot, of Manchester, N.H. Later he attended lectures at Harvard University Medical School in Boston, where he received the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1848. He began the active practice of his profession in Goshen, N.H., where he remained some seventeen years. Feeling the need of a larger sphere, he then removed to Concord. Here he continued in practice until his death, which was occasioned by an accident, complicated with pneumonia. He married Margaret, daughter of John and Hannah (Dowst) McCrillis; and his children were: H. E., Harvey, and Nathaniel. Harvey married C. J....

Biography of Andrew Jackson Kelley

Andrew Jackson Kelley, Postmaster of Dimond Hill, Hopkinton, a successful agriculturist of this town, and one of the brave men who fought in the late war, was born January 22, 1835, in Webster, Merrimack County, son of Timothy and Jane (Burbank) Kelley. Timothy Kelley was born December 25, 1778, in Kilcoloman, County Waterford, Ireland. He New York. Making his way from that city to Massachusetts, he lived for a time in Newbury, Mass., where he wooed and won his wife. Subsequently, removing to Webster, N.H., he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, July 15, 1854, aged seventy-five years and six months. His wife survived him many years, dying in May, 1873, at the venerable age of eighty-six years. Andrew J. Kelley spent the days of his boyhood and early manhood in Webster. Soon after the commencement of the late war he enlisted in Company E, Burdan’s sharpshooters, under Captain Amos B. Jones, being mustered into service September 9, 1861. He spent the ensuing winter in Washington on guard duty. In the spring he went to Fort Smith, Virginia, and afterward took an active party in thirty of the more important engagements, including those of Falls Church, Yorktown, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Petersburg, Manassas, and Mine Run. He remained with his company to the end of the contest, serving forty-seven months, and, though he was continually on the skirmish line, was neither wounded nor captured. After the capitulation of the Confederates he saw Lee’s men stack their guns, and he was present at the Grand Review in Washington with his comrades. At Kelly’s Ford the sharpshooters captured the Tenth...

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