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Earliest Records of All Saints’ Parish Frederick, Maryland, 1727-1781

* “These will probably seem meager and incomplete, but they are an exact and complete copy of the only records All Saints’ has for the period covered”-Emest Helfenstein. Barnhart, Benjamin m Rachael Wood, daughter of Joseph and Catharine Wood, April 3, 1773. Biggs, Benjamin m Hennaratta Prudence Deborah Margaretta Munday, daughter of Henry Munday, Sept. 26, 1745. Burroughs, John m Priscilla Rue, Mch. 17, 1760. Bushelle, Elizabeth daughter of Samuel Bushelle and Allatha his wife, Buried April 6, 1743. Byer, John m Ann Arnold April 3, 1743 Carmack, William and Jane. Children: Cornelius, b June 18, 1736. William, b Nov. 10, 1738. Evin, b Feb. 25, 1740. John, b May 12, 1742. Nathan, b Nov. 17, 1748. Levi, b Nov. 3, 1750. Quilah, b Jan. 13, 1754 Chapline, Joseph m Ruhamah daughter of Rev. William Williams, October 22, 1741. Children: William Williams, b Aug 20, 1742. Ruhamah, b Jan. 7, 1743-4. ” Ruhamah, Daughter of Joseph Chapline and Ruhamah his wife Buried Sept. 6, 1748. Joseph and Deborah, b Sept. 9, 1746. Jane, b Sept. 18, 1748. “Jane daughter of Joseph Chapline and Ruhamah his wife Buried July 19, 1754.” James, b Sept. 28, 1750. Ruhamah, b July 12,1752. Sarah, b July lo, 1754. Jeremiah, b June 24, 1756. Jane, b Mar. 23, 1758. Theodoras, b Mar. 14, 1760. Charlton, Arthur m Eleanor Harrison July 14, 1742. Children: Alice, b. Aug. 11, 1743. Thomas, b. Nov. 21, 1745. Elenor, b. June 25, 1748. Mary, b Jan. 31, 1750. John Usher, b June 21, 1753. Ann Phebe Penn, b. Feb. 6, 1756. Jane, b Dec. 23, 1757. Elizabeth Lettice, b...

Slave Narrative of Menellis Gassaway

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Menellis Gassaway Date of Interview: Sept. 1937 Location: M.E. Home, Carrollton Ave., Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Carroll County MD Date of Birth: 1850 or 52 Reference: Personal interview with Menellis Gassaway, ex-slave, on Sept. 22, 1937, at M.E. Home, Carrollton Ave., Baltimore. “My name is Menellis Gassaway, son of Owing and Annabel Gassaway. I was born in Freedom District, Carroll County, about 1850 or 52, brother of Henrietta, Menila and Villa. Our father and mother lived in Carroll County near Eldersberg in a stone and log cabin, consisting of two rooms, one up and one down, with four windows, two in each room, on a small farm situated on a public road, I don’t know the name. “My father worked on a small farm with no other slaves, but our family. We raised on the farm vegetables and grain, consisting of corn and wheat. Our farm produced wheat and corn, which was taken to the grist mill to be ground; besides, we raised hogs and a small number of other stock for food. “During the time I was a slave and the short time it was, I can’t remember what we wore or very much about local conditions. The people, that is the white people, were friendly with our family and other colored people so far as I can recall. “I do not recall of seeing slaves sold nor did the man who owned our family buy or sell slaves. He was a small man. “As to the farm, I do not know the size, but I know it was small. On the farm...

Slave Narrative of George Jones

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: George Jones Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Frederick County, Maryland Date of Birth: 1853 Age: 84 Place of Residence: 207 Aisquith St., Baltimore Md. Reference: Personal interview with George Jones, Ex-slave, at African M.E. Home, 207 Aisquith St., Baltimore. “I was born in Frederick County, Maryland, 84 years ago or 1853. My father’s name was Henry and mother’s Jane; brothers Dave, Joe, Henry, John and sisters Annie and Josephine. I know my father and mother were slaves, but I do not recall to whom they belonged. I remember my grandparents. “My father used to tell me how he would hide in the hay stacks at night, because he was whipped and treated badly by his master who was rough and hard-boiled on his slaves. Many a time the owner of the slaves and farm would come to the cabins late at night to catch the slaves in their dingy little hovels, which were constructed in cabin fashion and of stone and logs with their typical windows and rooms of one room up and one down with a window in each, the fireplaces built to heat and cook for occupants. “The farm was like all other farms in Frederick County, raising grain, such as corn, wheat and fruit and on which work was seasonable, depending upon the weather, some seasons producing more and some less. When the season was good for the crop and crops plentiful, we had a little money as the plantation owner gave us some to spend. “When hunting came, especially in the fall and winter, the weather was cold, I have...

Slave Narrative of James Wiggins

Person Interviewed: James Wiggins Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Anne Arundel County MD Date of Birth: 1850-1851 Place of Residence: 625 Barre St. Reference: Personal interview with James Wiggins, ex-slave, at his home, 625 Barre St. “I was born in Anne Arundel County, on a farm near West River about 1850 or 1851, I do not know which. I do not know my father or mother. Peter Brooks, one of the oldest colored men in the county, told me that my father’s name was Wiggins. He said that he was one of the Revells’ slaves. He acquired my father at an auction sale held in Baltimore at a high price from a trader who had an office on Pratt Street about 1845. He was given a wife by Mr. Revell and as a result of this union I was born. My father was a carpenter by trade, he was hired out to different farmers by Mr. Revell to repair and build barns, fences and houses. I have been told that my father could read and write. Once he was charged with writing passes for some slaves in the county, as a result of this he was given 15 lashes by the sheriff of the county, immediately afterwards he ran away, went to Philadelphia, where he died while working to save money to purchase mother’s freedom, through a white Baptist minister in Baltimore. “I was called “Gingerbread” by the Revells. They reared me until I reached the age of about nine or ten years old. My duty was to put logs on the fireplaces in the Revells’ house and...

Biography of Edward C. Simmons

Edward C. Simmons had passed the eightieth milestone when he was called from his activities to the world beyond. His career had indeed been a most active and useful one. He was numbered among those men to whom St. Louis attributes her development and her greatness. He entered the commercial circles of the city when a lad of sixteen years as an apprentice to the hardware trade in the store of Child, Pratt & Company on Main street, near Vine. From that time until his death his course was marked by a steady progression that ultimately gave him world leadership in connection with the hardware business until he stood at the head of the largest enterprise of this character not only in America but in all the world. It has been said that opportunity never knocks at the door of one who is not ready to receive her. At every point in his career Edward C. Simmons was watchful of those chances which would permit him to take a forward step and he was never afraid to venture when the way was open. The story of his life is certainly an inspiring one. Born in Frederick, Maryland, on the 21st of September, 1839, he was but seven years of age when brought by his parents, Zachariah T. and Louise (Helfenstein) Simmons, to St. Louis, where he became a public school pupil, passing through consecutive grades to his entrance to the high school, then located on Sixth, between St. Charles and Locust’ streets. When his textbooks were put aside he entered upon the apprenticeship previously indicated and after three years...

Biographical Sketch of Thomas S. Grasselli

Grasselli, Thomas S.; manufacturer; born, Cleveland, Nov. 14, 1875; son of C. A. and Johanna Ireland Grasselli; educated, Mt. St. Mary’s College, Emmitsburg, Md.; married, Rock Island, Ill., May 29, 1899, to Emilie Schmidt; issue, three boys; entered Troop A, O. N. G., 1893; appointed capt. and quartermaster First Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, May, 1898; resigned to accept appointment as captain and quartermaster U. S. V., and resigned after conclusion of war with Spain; engaged with Grasselli Chemical Co. in 1893; now first vice pres.; director Citizens Savings & Trust Co., Bank of Commerce, National Ass’n, Woodland Ave. Savings & Trust Co., Broadway Savings & Trust Co., member Union, and Chagrin Valley Hunt Clubs, and Chamber of...

Maryland Cemetery Records, Frederick to Montgomery Counties

Maryland Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Maryland county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MarylandMaryland Cemetery Records, Alleghany to BaltimoreMaryland Cemetery Records, Calvert to Dorchester CountiesMaryland Cemetery Records, Frederick to Montgomery CountiesMaryland Cemetery Records, Prince George to Worcester CountiesRocky Gap Veterans Cemetery Frederick County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Frederick County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Beaver Dam German Baptist Cemetery Benton Family Cemetery Bush Creek German Brethren Church Cemetery Catholic Church Cemetery Central Chapel United Methodist Church Cronise-Fundenburg Family Cemetery Elias Evangelical Lutheran Cemetery German Reformed Church Cemetery , aka St James Reformed Church Glade Reformed Cemetery Graceham Moravian Cemetery Grossnickle Church of the Brethren Cemetery House-Phillips Cemetery Ira Sears Cemetery Israel’s Creek Keedysville Cemetery Koontz Chapel Kramer-Jacobs Cemetery Linganore Cemetery McLain Family Cemetery McElfresh Burying Ground Mt. Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery Prospect United Methodist Church Cemetery Providence Methodist Church Cemetery Rocky Springs Cemetery Simmons Family Cemetery St. Ignatius Catholic St. John’s Lutheran Church Cemetery St. John’s Lutheran Church Cemetery St. Mark’s Lutheran Church Cemetery St. Matthews Lutheran Church St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church Summers Family Cemetery Tom’s Creek Cemetery Whitmore Cemetery Zimmerman Family Cemetery Zion Episcopal Cemetery Following Cemeteries (hosted at Interment) Hawbottom Johnson Family Cemetery Wolfesville Reformed Church Cemetery Garrett County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Garrett County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Deer Park Cemetery Hoyes United Methodist Church Cemetery Jesse Tomlinson Cemetery Zion Lutheran Church Cemetery Rose Hill Cemetery Bear Creek Church of the Brethren Burials...

Biography of Dr. Rodney Glisan

DR. RODNEY GLISAN. – Doctor Glisan is one of the few men of our state who have been original and productive in the literary field. His main works have been of a very substantial character, and upon recondite professional subjects, and have not, therefore, been brought to the notice of the general reader. But to those versed in the periodicals and literature of medicine he bears a name and reputation second to few in our national union. Essays, lectures and other emanations of his pen are to be met with in the leading medical journals. An extensive original treatise prepared by him upon a profound and difficult subject is a recognized manual in America, and is known even n the medical libraries of Europe. Without the avarice of fame possessed by many, and enjoying the confidence and opportunities of one high in the esteem of the members of his profession, Doctor Glisan passes the almost ideally happy life of the student and philanthropist, and has every honorable incentive to conduct the investigations in which is interest lies. His work gives permanent luster to our state. We now give briefly the data of his life. He was born at Linganore, Maryland, in 1827, being the son of Samuel and Eliza Glisan. His ancestry were among the first English settlers of Maryland. He graduated from the medical department of the University of Maryland in 1849, and after passing a severe competitive examination before a medical board was appointed a medical officer of the Untied States army in May, 1850. Having served in this capacity for about eleven years on the plains...

Biography of Rodney Glisan, M.D.

Rodney Glisan, physician of Portland, son of Samuel and Eliza Glisan, was born at Linganore, Frederick County, Maryland, January 29, 1827. His ancestors were among the first English settlers of Maryland. He was graduated in the medical department of the University of Maryland, in 1849, and after passing a severe competitive examination before a medical board, was appointed a medical officer of the United States Army, in May, 1850. Having served in this capacity for about eleven years on the plains, and in Oregon during her Indian wars, he resigned his commission and settled in Portland, where he has ever since been in the successful practice of his profession. In recognition of his services during the Indian hostilities in Oregon from 1855 to 1860 he was, in 1886, elected surgeon of the Grand Encampment of the Indian War Veterans of the North Pacific Coast, and still holds this honorary position. While stationed in Oregon as an army surgeon, Dr. Glisan had an excellent opportunity to ascertain the efficiency of volunteer soldiers and unlike a certain class of regular army officers, he has ever entertained the highest opinion of their soldierly qualities. Dr. Glisan was a professor in the first medical institution ever formed in Oregon, the Oregon Medical College, which subsequently assumed the name of The Medical Department of the Willamette University, in which he was for a long time a lecturer, and is still an emeritus professor. While an active member of this college, he felt the need of American text books in his department of obstetrics, none having been written for several years, and regretted the general...

Biographical Sketch of Joseph Rinehart

Hotel Rinehart was one of the hostelries of Battle Creek, Iowa, situated a short distance from the railroad depot. It had 14 bright, cheery, neat and comfortable rooms and was inviting to the dusty, fatigued traveler. There was a restaurant and lunch counter where the best of meals and all temperance drinks were provided. Mr. Rinehart was born in Frederick County, Maryland, February 21, 1859, son of Daniel and Margaret (Hyder) Rinehart, both natives of the same state. Joseph Rinehart joined the westward tide of emigration in 1882 and moved to Ida County, Iowa, where he entered the employ of the Bowman Lumber Co. After one year’s service there, he was transferred by the company to Holstein where he remained two years. He then moved to Ida Grove for the same company until March 1884. Then he was transferred to Arthur, Iowa, and took charge of that company’s yards there for 15 months. He then transferred to Battle Creek to superintend the same company’s yard there and stayed until June 1892 when the company sold out to other parties. Then he bought the hotel known as Hotel Hopkins. He married Elizabeth Estep, a native of Illinois, and the daughter of George W. and Sarah Estep. They had two children: Hazel Pearl and Jennie...

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