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Narrative of Marie Le Roy and Barbara Leininger

The Narrative of Mary le Roy and Barbara Leininger. Who for four and a half years were captive among the Indians, and on the 6th May 1759 arrived happy in this city. From her own lips never written and promoted to the Press. This manuscript gives an account of the captivity and escape of these two girls, whose families lived on Penn’s Creek, in the present Union County, Pennsylvania. It also provides a lengthy list of names of other prisoners met by the two ladies in their captivity.

Narrative of the Captivity of Maria and Christina Manheim – Indian Captivities

Frederick Manheim, an industrious German, with his family, consisting of his wife, a daughter of eighteen years of age, and Maria and Christina, his youngest children, (twins,) about sixteen, resided near the river Mohawk, eight miles west of Johnston. On the 19th of October, 1779, the father being at work at some distance from his habitation, and the mother and eldest daughter on a visit at a neighbor’s, two hostile Canasadaga Indians rushed in and captured the twin sisters. The party to which these savages belonged consisted of fifty warriors, who, after securing twenty-three of the inhabitants of that neighborhood, (among whom was the unfortunate Frederick Manheim) and firing their houses, retired for four days with the utmost precipitancy, till they were quite safe from pursuit. The place where they halted on the evening of the day of rest was a thick pine swamp, which rendered the darkness of an uncommonly gloomy night still more dreadful. The Indians kindled a fire, which they had not done before, and ordered their prisoners, whom they kept together, to refresh themselves with such provisions as they had. The Indians eat by themselves. After supper the appalled captives observed their enemies, instead of retiring to rest, busied in operations which boded nothing good. Two saplings were pruned clear of branches up to the very top, and all the brush cleared away for several rods around them. While this was doing, others were splitting pitch-pine billets into small splinters about five inches in length, and as small as one’s little finger, sharpening one end, and dipping the other in melted turpentine. At length, with...

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Biography of Jacob Newman

JACOB NEWMAN. – In the person of the subject of this sketch we have one of the heaviest real estate holders and most progressive agriculturists of the county, and one that has well earned the name of pioneer, having wrought here for forty years. In all this extended time he has displayed stanch, manly characteristics, while his sagacity and untiring labors for the good of all and especially for the advancement of the principles of Christianity in the upbuilding and nourishing of the early church are well known to our citizens. Mr. Newman is the son of George and Barbara (Hammond) Newman, and was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1826, whence his parents removed to Ohio for about twelve years, and thence to Indiana for twelve years, and thence to Iowa and there passed the remaining days of their service on earth and went hence to their rewards. Our subject came from Iowa to this section in 1862. He soon homesteaded a quarter-section twenty-five miles from Baker City on the Powder river, and for seven years he gave his attention to cultivating the soil and raising stock. Then he sold out and removed to the Grande Ronde valley, settling one mile east from Old Town on a quarter-section of land. He followed general farming and raising stock steadily, handling his business with care and thrift and the result was that prosperity in unbounded measure attended him, and he was enabled to add to his realty holdings by purchase until he is the proprietor of a generous estate of two thousand acres in the vicinity of his home place...

Biography of Samuel Walker

Samuel Walker, for nearly forty years one of the most stirring figures in the military and civil commotions which centered in the Lawrence region, was a Pennsylvanian, born in Franklin County, October 19, 1822. In 1848 he moved to Ohio and followed his trade as a cabinet maker, and in April, 1855, settled permanently in Kansas. He came with a large party of emigrants and located near Lawrence, with other pronounced free-soil settlers. About six weeks later he was urged by the sheriff of Douglas County to leave the country, but his answer was made the next day, in the organization of a company of eighty-six free-soilers under the name of the Bloomington Guards. Mr. Walker was first sergeant of the body. In the following year he was elected colonel of the Fourth Kansas Cavalry, which participated in all the campaigus of the free-state men. In that capacity he was at the sieges of Lawrence and Fort Saunders and in command at the capture of Fort Titus. In 1856 Mr. Walker served as a member of the Territorial House of Representatives under the Topeka constitution, and it was he who, in February, 1858, found the returns of the election under the Lccompton constitution hidden in a candle box near the office of Surveyor General Calhoun at Lecompton. From June, 1861, until May, 1862, he served in the Civil war as captain of Company F, First Kansas Volunteer Infantry, and was afterward promoted to major of the Fifth Kansas Cavalry, serving in the latter post until the regiment was mustered out. In October, 1864, he became colonel of the Sixteenth...

Biography of Mrs. A. C. Stich

Mrs. A. C. Stich by her inheritance of some of the best of old American stock and as head of the home over which she presided for so many years, is a Kansas woman of whom some special note should be made. Her great-grandfather William Henry Stoy was the founder of the family in America, having emigrated from Germany. He was a ministor of the Episcopal Church, and spent many years in preaching in Pennsylvania, where he died. Her paternal grandfather Heury William Stoy was born in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, in 1782 and died in West Virginia in 1858. He was one of two sons, his brother being Gustavus Stoy. Henry William Stoy was a physician and surgeon and practiced for many years at Brownsville, Pennsylvania, and in the latter part of his life in West Virginia. Mrs. Stich’s father was Capt. William Stoy, who was born in Brownsville, Pennsylvania, in 1815 and died in Waynesburg of that state in 1898. A man of great talent as a musician, he was both a teacher and composer of music. At the beginning of the Civil war in 1861 he enlisted and was at the head of a regimental band of one hundred members. He was wounded while in the service and was honorably discharged after eighteen months. He was a democrat, a member of the Masonic fraternity, and belonged to the Presbyterian Church. Captain Stoy married Margaret Biggs, who was born in Ohio in 1826 and died in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, in 1896. Her grandfather, and the greatgrandfather of Mrs. Stich, was Gen. Benjamin Biggs, who served all through the Revolutionary war,...

Biography of William M. Phenicie

William M. Phenicie, proprietor of the Sunny Prairie Farm in Stanton Township, has known Champaign County for over half a century and was a factor in making it one of the garden spots of the world whether considered from an agricultural standpoint or as the home of industrious and worthy people. Mr. Phenicie is a native of Pennsylvania, having been born at Mercersburg in Franklin County, a son of Joseph and Susan (Conner) Phenicie. His parents were also natives of the same state and were of English and German ancestry. William M. was one of seven children, four sons and three daughters, all of whom were well educated in the district schools of Franklin County. In 1861, the year the Civil War broke out, William Phenicie married Margaret Besore. She was also a native of Franklin County, a daughter of John and Mary (Mouen) Besore. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Phenicie located on one of his father’s farms, but two years later came out to Illinois, where two of Mrs. Phenicie’s brothers were living in Vermilion County. They spent only one year in that county, and then came to Stanton Township in’ Champaign County. Here they rented land and subsequently Mr. Phenicie bought 120 acres at $8 an acre from the Illinois Central Bailway. It was a tract of virgin prairie, without a single improvement, and their first home was one of the cabins such as dotted this county in pioneer times. The passing years brought evidences of their industry and good management, a good house was built, fruit and shade trees were planted, and the land was...

Biography of Samuel Strickler

The story of pioneer life in Idaho is well known to such men as Samuel Strickler, for through thirty-six years he has been a witness of the development of the northwest and has faithfully borne his part in the work of up building and advancement; he now resides in Bellevue. He claims Pennsylvania as the state of his nativity, his birth occurring in Chambersburg, Franklin County, November 21, 1832. He is of German descent and his ancestors were among the early settlers of the Keystone state. His father, Samuel Strickler, was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and married Susanna Hollinger, also a native of Pennsylvania. Twelve children, six sons and six daughters, were born of this union, and ten grew to maturity, while six are yet living. The father died in 1875, at the age of eighty-one years, and the mother passed away a little later at about the same age. Mr. Strickler, of this review, was educated in Pennsylvania and in 1846 accompanied his family on their removal to Mount Carroll, Illinois, where he also attended school. In 1859 he crossed the plains to Colorado with an ox team and through the summer successfully engaged in mining. In the fall of the same year he returned to his home in Illinois, and in 1860 he again went west, locating in Denver, where he engaged in farming, selling his produce in that city. He was very successful in that venture, but in 1863, learning of the gold excitement in Idaho, he purchased a stock of miners’ supplies and took them to the territory, opening a store in Idaho City, July...

Biography of Jacob E. Brewer

Jacob E. Brewer. The author of the two cent railroad fare law in Kansas is Jacob E. Brewer of Abilene. Mr. Brewer proposed, introduced and successfully advocated that law during his membership in the State Senate from 1905 to 1909, representing the district of Clay and Dickinson counties. Mr. Brewer is an old and well known merchant of Abilene. He had the chief department store there and is also a wholesale commission merchant. It is said that 200 carloads of eggs are gathered and shipped to market through his plant every year. Permanence and solidity is a part of Mr. Brewer’s personal and business character. His big store at Abilene occupies the same site where he first began selling goods thirty-five years ago. Besides his store Mr. Brewer is a director of the Abilene National Bank, is a prominent Knight Templar Mason and Shriner, also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, and had long taken an active part in republican politics in his section of the state. While in the State Senate he was chairman of the insurance committee, a member of the oil and gas committee, of the fees and salaries committee, and an active worker in behalf of all the advanced and progressive legislation proposed during his term. For a number of years he served as chairman of the Dickinson County Republican Central Committee and had been a delegate to various state conventions. He had always been deeply interested in educational affairs and long served as president of the Board of Education at Abilene. Born in a log house on a farm in Franklin County, Pennsylvania,...
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