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Expeditions of Fowler and James to Santa Fe, 1821

When Pike returned from his western expedition and related his experiences in Santa Fe and other places among the Spaniards, his accounts excited great interest in the east, which resulted in further exploits. In 1812, an expedition was undertaken1 by Robert McKnight, James Baird, Samuel Chambers, Peter Baum, Benjamin Shrive, Alfred Allen, Michael McDonald, William Mines, and Thomas Cook, all citizens of Missouri Territory; they were arrested by the Spaniards, charged with being in Spanish territory without a passport, and thrown into the calabazos of Chihuahua, where they were kept for nine years. In 1821, two of them escaped, and coming down Canadian and Arkansas rivers met Hugh Glenn, owner of a trading house at the mouth of the Verdigris, and told him of the wonders of Santa Fe. Inspired by the accounts of these travelers, Glenn engaged in an enterprise with Major Jacob Fowler and Captain Pryor for an expedition from the Verdigris to Santa Fe.2 The members of the McKnight party who had escaped from the Spaniards, continued their journey to Saint Louis, where they repeated their romantic tale to John McKnight, a brother of Robert McKnight who was still a prisoner with the Spaniards, and to others. As a result of their account, McKnight and General Thomas James organized an expedition to go from Saint Louis to Santa Fe. James’s purpose was to trade with the Indians, and John McKnight went to see his brother and procure his release, if possible. The two expeditions got under way the same summer, and both went by way of the Arkansas as high as the Verdigris, which at that...

Narrative of the Captivity of Capt. William Hubbell – Indian Captivities

A Narrative of the desperate encounter and escape of Capt. William Hubbell from the Indians while descending the Ohio River in a boat with others, in the year 1791. Originally set forth in the Western Review, and afterwards republished by Dr. Metcalf, in his “Narratives of Indian Warfare in the West.” In the year 1791, while the Indians were yet troublesome, especially on the banks of the Ohio, Capt. William Hubbell, who had previously emigrated to Kentucky from the state of Vermont, and who, after having fixed his family in the neighborhood of Frankfort, then a frontier settlement, had been compelled to go to the eastward on business, was now a second time on his way to this country. On one of the tributary streams of the Monongahela, he procured a flat-bottomed boat, and embarked in company with Mr. Daniel Light and Mr. William Plascut and his family, consisting of a wife and eight children, destined for Limestone, Kentucky. On their passage down the river, and soon after passing Pittsburgh, they saw evident traces of Indians along the banks, and there is every reason to believe that a boat which they overtook, and which, through carelessness, was suffered to run aground on an island, became a prey to these merciless savages. Though Capt. Hubbell and his party stopped some time for it in a lower part of the river, it did not arrive, and it has never, to their knowledge, been heard of. Before they reached the mouth of the great Kenhawa they had, by several successive additions, increased their number to twenty persons, consisting of nine men, three...

Frankfort Cemetery, Frankfort, Franklin County, Kentucky

LACEY Mollie L Callahan, wife of W. M. Lacey, b. 1854, d. 1907. Mary Sullivan, wife of W. M. Lacey, b. 1863, d. 1913. DAUGHERTY William, d. 19 Mar. 1880, age 73 yrs. Husb. of Mary Ann. Mary Ann, b. 7 Dec. 1799, Ky., d. 24 Mar. 1869. MORRIS Edwin Henry, b. 16 Apr. 1846, d. 12 Sept. 1924. Husb. of Eddie Stephens. Eddie Stephens, b. 9 Sept. 1855, d. 5 June 1915. Ralph H., b. 22 July 1882, d. 18 Feb. 1908. PETERS James A., b. 20 Oct. 1852, d. 20 Mar. 1928. Husb. of Lucy Johnson. Lucy Johnson, b. 8 July 1848, d. 8 July 1929. WRIGHT Henry, b. 25 Sept. 1850, d. 7 Feb. 1929. Husb. of Manerva Jane Milburn. Manerva Jane Milburn, b. 13 May 1848, d. 11 May 1930. YOUNG James A., b. 16 June 1878, d. 11 July 1909. DALTON Nanie G., b. 4 July 1880, d. 31 May 1906. MCDONALD B. F., b. 18 Dec. 1861, d. 13 May 1903. Husb. of Agnes. HANDY Henry, b. 1854, d. 1893. Emiline, b. 1836, d. 1898. Walter, b. 2 Apr. 1880, d. 28 June 1896. SMITH Tab, b. Apr. 1815, d. 5 Mar. 1894. Husb. of Martha. Martha, b. 6 Apr. 1830, d. 9 Sept. 1903. Henry, b. Jan. 1831, d. 10 Jan. 1887. SHELTON Emma, b. 1852, d. 21 July 1891. Listed with Smith family. COLEMAN Milton, b. 1842, d. 1918. Husb. of Dolly. Dolly, b. 1847, d. 1921. Elizabeth, b. 1 Aug. 1834, d. 6 Aug. 1898. BATES John, b. 4 Feb. 1834, Clay Co., Ky., d. 19 Jan. 1848, in the...

Through Ohio And Kentucky

Sunday, Oct. 18.–Myself and friend proceeded on our journey. We arrived at Siers, a distance of thirty miles, at dusk, much relieved by the change from our horses to the wagon. The roads were muddy, the weather drizzly and the country hilly. Buildings indifferent. The land very fertile and black. Trees uncommonly tall. Passed the little village of Cadis. In this country a tavern, a store, a smith shop and two or three cabins make a town. Passed ten or fifteen travelers. Great contrast between the quality of the land from Chambersburg to Pittsburg, and that which we have already traveled over from Steubenville in Ohio. Monday, Oct. 19.–Left Siers at 6 o’clock a. m. The morning fair and cold. Roads extremely rough. Country fertile, but hilly. Log cabins, ugly women and tall timber. Passed a little flourishing village called Freeport, settled by foreigners. Yankee Quakers and mechanics. Remarkable, with two taverns in the village, there was nothing fit to drink, not even good water. The corn fields in the woods among dead trees and the corn very fine. We arrived at Adairs, a distance of twenty-seven miles, at 6 o’clock p. m. Passed some peddlers and a few travelers. Value of land from Steubenville to Adairs from $2 to $30 per acre. Lots in Freeport, eighteen months old, from $30 to $100. This day being Monday and the end of the second week since leaving home, our feelings were warm and our hearts beat high for those that are dear and behind us. Tuesday, Oct. 20.–Left Adairs at 6 o’clock a. m. The country extremely hilly and not...

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Preston

Interviewer: G. Monroe Person Interviewed: Mrs. Preston Location: Madison, Indiana Age: 83 Place of Residence: North Elm Street, Madison, Indiana G. Monroe Dist. 4 Jefferson County SLAVE STORY MRS. PRESTON’S STORY Mrs. Preston is an old lady, 83 years old, very charming and hospitable She lives on North Elm Street, Madison, Indiana. Her first recollections of slavery were of sleeping on the foot of her mistress’ bed, where she could get up during the night to “feed” the fire with chips she had gathered before dark or to get a drink or anything else her mistress might want in the night. Her ‘Marse Brown’, resided in Frankfort having taken his best horses and hogs, and leaving his family in the care of an overseer on a farm. He was afraid the Union soldiers would kill him, but thought his wife would be safe. This opinion proved to be true. The overseer called the slaves to work at four o’clock, and they worked until six in the evening. When Mrs. Preston was a little older part of her work was to drive about a dozen cows to and from the stable. Many a time she warmed her bare feet in the cattle bedding. She said they did not always go barefooted but their shoes were old or their feet wrapped in rags. Her next promotion was to work in the fields hauling shocks of corn on a balky mule which was subject to bucking and throwing its rider over its head. She was aided by a little boy on another mule. There were men to tie the shocks and place...

Slave Narrative of Sarah C. Colbert

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Sarah Colbert Location: Indianapolis, Indiana Place of Birth: Allen County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1855 Place of Residence: 1505 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. SARAH COLBERT-EX-SLAVE 1505 North Capitol Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana Mrs. Sarah Carpenter Colbert was born in Allen County, Kentucky in 1855. She was owned by Leige Carpenter, a farmer. Her father, Isaac Carpenter was the grandson of his master, Leige Carpenter, who was very kind to him. Isaac worked on the farm until the old master’s death. He was then sold to Jim McFarland in Frankfort Kentucky. Jim’s wife was very mean to the slaves, whipped them regularly every morning to start the day right. One morning after a severe beating, Isaac met an old slave, who asked him why he let his mistress beat him so much. Isaac laughed and asked him what he could do about it. The old man told him if he would bite her foot, the next time she knocked him down, she would stop beating him and perhaps sell him. The next morning he was getting his regular beating, he willingly fell to the floor, grabbed his mistress’ foot, bit her very hard. She tried very hard to pull away from him, he held on still biting, she ran around in the room, Isaac still holding on. Finally, she stopped beating him and never attempted to strike him again. The next week he was put on the block, being a very good worker and a very strong man,...

Slave Narrative of Mrs. M. S. Fayman

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Mrs. M. S. Fayman Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: St. Nazaire Parish LA Date of Birth: 1850 Reference: Personal interview with Mrs. Fayman, at her home, Cherry Heights near Baltimore, Md. “I was born in St. Nazaire Parish in Louisiana, about 60 miles south of Baton Rouge, in 1850. My father and mother were Creoles, both of them were people of wealth and prestige in their day and considered very influential. My father’s name was Henri de Sales and mother’s maiden name, Marguerite Sanchez De Haryne. I had two brothers Henri and Jackson named after General Jackson, both of whom died quite young, leaving me the only living child. Both mother and father were born and reared in Louisiana. We lived in a large and spacious house surrounded by flowers and situated on a farm containing about 750 acres, on which we raised pelicans for sale in the market at New Orleans. “When I was about 5 years old I was sent to a private School in Baton Rouge, conducted by French sisters, where I stayed until I was kidnapped in 1860. At that time I did not know how to speak English; French was the language spoken in my household and by the people in the parish. “Baton Rouge, situated on the Mississippi, was a river port and stopping place for all large river boats, especially between New Orleans and large towns and cities north. We children were taken out by the sisters after school and on Saturdays and holidays to walk. One of the places we went was the wharf. One day...

Biography of Hord Hardin

Hord Hardin is connected with one of the strongest financial concerns of the middle west, being the vice president of the Mississippi Valley Trust Company. Mere success has never throughout the history of the world, save in a few rare instances, been the cause of any individual being remembered by his fellows and never has the mere accumulation of wealth gained any man honor. The methods employed in the attainment of wealth, however, may awaken approval and admiration, for the world pays its tribute to him who through enterprise, unrelaxing effort and clear-sighted judgment makes advancement in the business world without infringing on the rights of others. Such has been the record of Hord Hardin, who has wisely used the opportunities that have been presented, who has thoroughly acquainted himself with the tasks in hand and with modern business methods and has displayed marked adaptability in using his powers and his opportunities for the upbuilding of the business. In order to further equip himself for the demands of present-day business conditions he attended night school. His more advanced education was acquired in St. Louis, while his early studies were pursued in the public schools of Frankfort, Kentucky, in which city he was born April 10, 1888. His father, David C. Hardin, was also a native of that state and was a lawyer by profession, practicing for many years in Bardstown, save for the period of his service with the Confederate forces in the Civil war. He married Hannah Hord, a representative of an old American family connected with Virginia and Kentucky. They became the parents of two sons and...

Biography of Hon. Samuel F. Taylor

Hon. Samuel F. Taylor was not a pioneer of Idaho Falls simply. He was one of a very few who were pioneers at that locality before the town had a beginning, and was active in an enterprise which was influential in locating a town at that point on the Snake river. He came to the place in 1870 with his cousin, J. M. Taylor, who with the firm of Taylor & Anderson, built the bridge across the Snake river at the falls. It was the first bridge in this part of the state, was a great aid to immigration and made Idaho Falls (then Eagle Rock) a point of so much importance on the route into this country, and to the country beyond, that the springing up of a good town there was a foregone conclusion, and only a matter of time. Samuel F. Taylor is a member of an old Kentucky family, and his paternal grandfather was a pioneer in that state. Samuel F. Taylor, Sr., his father, was born there and married Fanny Simpson, and in his time was prominent in that state. Samuel F. Taylor, Jr., was born in Kentucky April 18, 1848, and in 1849 his parents removed to Missouri and located in Lafayette County. His father was a lawyer and a farmer. The family were strict Presbyterians. Samuel F. Taylor, Sr., was an ardent southerner, and shortly after the beginning of our civil war he enlisted in the Confederate army and served under General Sterling Price, and was killed in battle at Corinth, Mississippi. Records show that he was captain of Company B, Sixth-Missouri...

Biography of James S. Acker

James S. Acker, proprietor of the general mercantile cash store, at Mountain Home, is one of the successful businessmen of the town, and his enterprise and energy have given him rank among the leading representatives of commercial interests in Elmore county. A native of Alabama, he was born near Birmingham, on the 6th of August 1865. His ancestors were natives of Holland and at an early day joined a Dutch colony that settled in South Carolina. His father, Dr. J. W. Acker, engaged in the practice of medicine throughout his business career and became a very prominent and successful physician, being for many years numbered among the distinguished representatives of the profession in Shelby County. William Acker had removed at an early day from South Carolina, in which state the Ackers were well known planters and owned many slaves. Dr. Acker married Miss Sarah Caffee, a native of Alabama, and a descendant of one of the old southern families. Her people were connected with the Baptist church, while the Ackers were Methodists in religious faith. James S. Acker is one of a family of six children, four of whom are yet living. He spent his boyhood days in the state of his nativity, attended school there and was later graduated in the commercial department of the Kentucky State University. He entered upon his business career in the capacity of a journalist, writing for the Evening Chronicle and the Birmingham Age-Herald; but circumstances caused him to enter other fields of labor and he began merchandising, for which work he is well adapted. He is a man of keen foresight, of...
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