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Scenes at Fort Laramie

Looking back, after the expiration of a year, upon Fort Laramie and its inmates, they seem less like a reality than like some fanciful picture of the olden time; so different was the scene from any which this tamer side of the world can present. Tall Indians, enveloped in their white buffalo robes, were striding across the area or reclining at full length on the low roofs of the buildings which inclosed it. Numerous squaws, gayly bedizened, sat grouped in front of the apartments they occupied; their mongrel offspring, restless and vociferous, rambled in every direction through the fort; and the trappers, traders, and engages of the establishment were busy at their labor or their amusements. We were met at the gate, but by no means cordially welcomed. Indeed, we seemed objects of some distrust and suspicion until Henry Chatillon explained that we were not traders, and we, in confirmation, handed to the bourgeois a letter of introduction from his principals. He took it, turned it upside down, and tried hard to read it; but his literary attainments not being adequate to the task, he applied for relief to the clerk, a sleek, smiling Frenchman, named Montalon. The letter read, Bordeaux (the bourgeois) seemed gradually to awaken to a sense of what was expected of him. Though not deficient in hospitable intentions, he was wholly unaccustomed to act as master of ceremonies. Discarding all formalities of reception, he did not honor us with a single word, but walked swiftly across the area, while we followed in some admiration to a railing and a flight of steps opposite the entrance....

Biography of John Clare

John Clare. The name of John Clare recalls one of the very early territorial pioneers of Kansas. This family, of Irish origin, settled in Eastern Kansas about the time the original Kansas-Nebraska bill was being considered by Congress, and from that time to the present members of the family have shared their fortunes with the fortunes of the Sunflower State, have been worthy members of various communities and have done their share in carrying forward the work of advancement and progress. The late John Clare was born in Queens County, Ireland, in 1836. His father Michael Clare first brought his family to America about 1840. In the City of Boston he taught school for several years, but then returned to the old country. In 1851 he came a second time to America, and located in Washington, D. C. In 1854, before the first territorial government of Kansas was organized, he located in Leavenworth. He lived there for eleven years, and in 1865 moved to Atchison County, establishing his home on a claim seven miles south of the city of Atchison. Thenceforward he took a very prominent part in the community of Mount Pleasant, where he organized the first public school and became its teacher. Michael Clare was born in Ireland in 1800 and died in 1875 on the homestead that he had improved at Mount Pleasant. John Clare was eighteen years of age when the family came to Kansas in 1854. Thenceforward he was actively identified with those movements which eventually made Kansas a free state. He and his brother subsequently were employed by the government in the freighting...

Mills, Doratha Mae “Dottie” – Obituary

Doratha Mae “Dottie” Mills 76, of Baker City, died May 19, 2005, at her home. There will be a family service later at Ft. Laramie, Wyo. She will be buried in Wyoming alongside her mother and sister. She was born on Dec. 19, 1928, at Ft. Laramie, Wyo., to Orville E. and Doratha Knott Mills. She attended high school at Coos Bay and homesteaded at Big Piney, Wyo. She worked as a bartender in Sweet Home. She had gardening and houseplant skills and loved smelling freshly turned earth ready for planting — anything. Food first if money is tight, then flowers if you can afford them. She always knew just what to grow where and what to fertilize it with and how to talk to it! She had cooking skills and knew just how to make $5 a day stretch into some pretty good meals. How to look in the cupboard and “see” what to put together. Where someone else saw a can of soup, she taught her children to make a meal for four. Her children are considered to be pretty good cooks and can set a nice table thanks to the endless hours they spent watching her whip something up. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL...

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