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James Wilson Genealogy

I. The ancestor of the Daniel2 Wilson family came from Tyrone, Ireland, in 1737, with the famous Scotch Irish emigrants. These emigrants were a hardy, industrious, long-lived, honest and sturdy race of people. A great proportion of New Hampshire’s most distinguished sons are found among their descendants. One of these emigrants was James1 Wilson. The history of Peterborough gives his name as WILLIAM. Later researches favor JAMES, but we are not positively sure of the name. Nor do we know who was his wife. They brought with them from Ireland a son, Robert2, and a daughter, Lettuce2. In this country they had at least two more sons, Daniel2 and James2. Robert2 lived in Peterboro’ and was the father of Anne3 (killed by a log falling from a fence upon her, in childhood), Hon. James3, William3, Anne3 (who m. Jeremiah Swan), Mary3 (who m. Gen. John Steele), Hon. John3 of Belfast, Me., (in the U. S. Congress in 1813-1814), Joseph3 and Sarah3 (m. Hon. John Scott Harrison, son of President William Henry Harrison, 9th President of the U. S. and father of Benjamin Harrison, 23rd President of the U. S.) Hon. James3 Wilson of Peterboro and Keene was the father of Gen. James4 Wilson, the well known lawyer and orator of Keene and a member of the 30th and 31st U. S. Congresses; Col. Robert4 Wilson, who was a well known character in Keene; Elizabeth Jane4 (who m. William G. Hunter); and Sarah M. A.4, who m. Col. Frank Lee of Boston. The emigrant, James1 Wilson, spent the winter of 1737-8 in West Cambridge, Mass., and then moved to Townsend,...

Crown Point, Lake Champlain

It would be hard, gazing upon Crown Point today, to realize the storms and terrors it let loose upon the English colonists not quite two hundred years ago. Girt by the smiling waters of one of America’s most beautiful lakes, overtopped by a verdant mountain, and gazing out upon green fields in the shade of majestic woodlands, all of the atmosphere of the place is one of peace and aloofness from the pain of human suffering. Yet the name ” Crown Point ” was a sinister thing in the early days of the English colonists, particularly in the northern provinces. The New England matron putting to bed her infant Stephen Brewster or little Praise the Lord Jones, or the Dutch vrouw in the country round about Albany with her little Van Rensselaer Tasselwitch, had but to utter this dreadful name, ” Crown Point,” to bring her child into the most docile state of apprehension. From Crown Point went forth the scalping parties of French, Indian and half breeds, which preyed upon the borders of the English colonies, carrying wrack and horror wherever they went. A glad and beautiful place, it nourished in its heart an evil spirit. The settlement of the Crown Point district by the French began soon after the opening of the eighteenth century. The beautiful lake which bears the name of its discoverer had been known in France for more than a century, and the country which lay between Lake Champlain and Lake Ontario – all that wilderness stretch of northern New York of today – had been charted with a fair degree of exactness, as...

Biography of Eugene F. Skinner

EUGENE F. SKINNER. – Eugene F. Skinner, whose name is a household word throughout the length and breadth of Lane county, located in June, 1846, the Donation claim on which Eugene City, named for him, now stands. He was born at Essex, Essex county, New York, September 13, 1809, and is the youngest son of Major John Joseph Skinner of East Windsor, Connecticut, and a brother of St. John B.L. Skinner of New York, who was an influential officer in the Postoffice Department at Washington City, District of Columbia, under President Lincoln, and first assistant postmaster-general under President Johnson. Having lost his mother when but three months old, Eugene was favored with particular attention by his father, and when he attained the age of fourteen years was taken to Albany, Green County, Wisconsin, among relatives who were all interested in his welfare. While yet in early life, however, he went back to his native state, and to Plattsburg, the home of his childhood. Soon after this he turned his face westward and settled at Hennepin, Putnam County, Illinois. In youth he was of a most industrious disposition, and by diligent application obtained a good education, which fitted him in after life for many positions of trust and honor. Having lived on a farm, he naturally learned the intricacies of agriculture, and drank in of the spirit of adventure that subsequently developed in him the desire to assume the arduous undertakings of a life on the frontier. He married in Illinois, November 28, 1839, Mary Cook, who was born in Augusta, Oneida county, New York, February 7, 1816. While a...

Biography of Jesse L. Conant, M. D.

The subject of this sketch is a worthy example of the large class of well read, careful and honorable physicians who are dear to their fellow townsmen wherever their lot may be cast. They are near to the people in sickness and trouble and grow very near to them in all relations of life, and become, many of them, the most influential men in their communities. Doctor Jesse Lyman Conant, mayor and prominent physician and druggist of Genesee, Idaho, was born in Birmingham, Essex County, New York, May 31, 1831, and is descended from an old Norman family which went to the mother country with William the Conqueror. George Conant, who came early to New England and was the friend and rival of Miles Standish, was the progenitor of the family in America. Doctor Conant’s grandfather was born in Berkshire, Massachusetts, and his son, Clark Conant, who was Doctor Conant’s father, was a native of the same town. Clark Conant married Samantha Grandy of Vermont, and moved to Jackson County, Michigan, at a comparatively early date. Thence they removed, in 1878, when somewhat advanced in life, to Los Angeles, California, where Mr. Conant died at the age of ninety-eight, and Mrs. Conant at the age of ninety-six. They were of the highest character and were almost lifelong members of the Baptist church. They had six children, of whom four are living. George Clark Conant died in defense of his country during the civil war. Doctor Jesse Lyman Conant was educated in a general way in the public schools and professionally in Rush Medical College, where he stood third in...

Biography of Elverdo Draper

ELVERDO DRAPER. – To the leading and prominent citizen, whose name initiates this paragraph, we are pleased to accord a representation in this volume because he has manifested during the years in which he has been domiciled in Union county ability of a fine order, and because he has materially assisted in the progress of the county and substantially aided in its upbuilding, while he has developed its resources and augmented its wealth by his enterprising endeavors in his private business; and during all this commendable course there has not only been displayed a praiseworthy sagacity and integrity but a meritorious conduct and morality and uprightness that have marked Mr. Draper as a light in the community, to which one is pleased to refer. He was born in Essex county, New York, on August 28, 1848, to Henry and Emily (Palmer) Draper, and with his parents ten years later came to Scott county, Iowa, where they rented land. Here and at his native place he received his schooling and worked on the farm in Iowa until he was twenty years of age. At that time he was married to Miss Adeline, daughter of Cyrenus and Melinda Pelham, natives of New York state. To them were born the following children: Maryette, wife of G.S. Johnson, of Union; Lula, wife of William M. Cockrell; Maude Ethel, wife of Albert Logan, of Union; and on July 11, 1888, their only son, Dick, was born to them. For two years subsequent to his marriage he farmed with his father-in-law and then rented a quarter section for himself which he operated until 1871, when...

Biography of Matthew Hale

MATTHEW HALE A MAN of fine legal attainments and of high personal character, who has been a steady resident of Albany for the past twenty-two years is the Hon. Matthew Hale, On the 20th of June, 1829, in the little town of Chelsea, in the state of Vermont, this well-known jurist first saw the light of day. His ancestry is in every respect a notable one – including admirable combinations of intellectual, moral and religious principles. His father, Harry Hale, was a descendant of one Thomas Hale, an English yeoman, who immigrated to this country in 1638, and settled in Newbury, Mass. Harry Hale was a leading citizen in his day, and a man of great excellence of character. He was born in 1780, and when about twenty years of age formed a partnership with his brother Nathan, and became a country merchant, first at Windsor and afterward at West Windsor, Vt. He removed to Chelsea, Vt., where he still carried on a country store under the firm-name of Hale & Dickinson. A few years before the birth of his son Matthew, he retired from trade and devoted himself to the management of a grist mill and to farming. He was a captain of the militia, held various town offices; and in 1828, ’32, and ’36, represented Chelsea in the Vermont legislature. He was also for several years county clerk of Orange county, and about the year 1835, was elected by the legislature bank commissioner of the state. A memorial window of stained glass may be seen today in the rear of the pulpit of the Congregational church, in...

Biography of Isaac G. Perry

ISAAC G. PERRY AN architect of high standing and great popularity in his profession is Isaac G. Perry, the regular capitol commissioner, whose official residence is now in Albany. Born in Bennington, Vt., of Scottish ancestry, on the 24th of March, 1822, he passed his earliest days amidst the grand, patriotic scenes of the Green mountains, breathing pure, invigorating air and laying the foundation of a strong constitution. His father, Seneca Perry, a native of White Creek, Washington County, N. Y., and a carpenter and joiner by trade, died in 1868. His mother, whose maiden name was Martha Ann Taggart, was born at Londenary, N. H., and died in 1860. She was ardently attached to the old Presbyterian faith. His grandfather was Valentine Perry, and his grandmother, Patient (Hays) Perry, both of White Creek. His grandmother on his maternal side was Mary Woodburn of Londenary, N. H. The Woodburns came from Scotland to this country at an early date, and settled in Londenary and its vicinity. His parents removed to Keeseville, Essex County, N. Y., when their son Isaac was a lad of seven years. There he attended the village school for several terms, and served an apprenticeship with his father as a carpenter and joiner, pursuing his studies in this line with the greatest enthusiasm from early morn until late at night. He may, in fact, be called a born architect, so early did this subject engross his thoughts and fire his ambition. And so speedily did he acquire knowledge of its elementary principles that in a short time he began to do work on his own account....

The Forest Theater, Ticonderoga, New York

Near the shore of Lake Champlain stands a beautiful pine and hemlock grove, the site of an ancient Indian village. Here, every August, is held an Indian pageant based on the lives of famous Six Nation Chiefs and warriors. This Indian pageant has grown from a handful of actors to a cast of as high as a hundred and twenty five. Thousands of people travel many miles to see these pageants. As they watch the actors they are taken back to the days when the Six Nations held sway over the beautiful Ticonderoga Region. The festival owes its birth and growth to a friend and adopted brother, Thomas. D. Cook or better known as Ka-hon-hes ‘A Long River’ because like a growing river his good work widens and covers much territory as be goes along in life. Since a boy, Ka-hon-hes has been filled with pity and shame at the treatment accorded the Indian by the white race. Mr. Cook, as a keen student of Indian history, was still more disgusted knowing that the average white person continued to believe erroneous, false notions that the Indian Race was made up of bloodthirsty, sadistic people. To bring home the truths about the Indian, and particularly the Six Nations, to as many people as possible and in the most convincing manner Tom Cook developed the Indian Pageants. Each of the several pageants has been written by himself. Each has been studied by officials of the New York State Historical Association who have sent back word that the pageants are, in every detail, absolutely authentic and accurate. In these pageants are scenes...

Biography of J. W. Towner

J. W. Towner the subject of this sketch, now Judge of the Superior Court of Orange County, is a native of Essex County, New York, born in 1823, in the town of Willsboro. When he was fifteen years old his father moved to St. Lawrence County, same State. His education was only that of the common school except one term, in 1841, at the Malone Academy, Franklin County. In 1844, he and an older brother went to Cleveland, Ohio, where he remained until 1854, when he went to West Union, Fayette County, Iowa, remaining there until August, 1861, when he entered the army, becoming Captain of Company F, Ninth Iowa Infantry Volunteers. At the battle of Pea Ridge he was disabled by the loss of his left eye. After his recovery he was commissioned by President Lincoln, Captain of Company B, Second Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps. This commission he held till July, 1866. Then he returned to Cleveland, Ohio, and in 1874 went to Madison County, New York, where he resided until 1882. He then came to Santa Ana. During these years his occupations were, from seventeen to twenty-six, teaching school winters and working by the day or month summers; in 1849 he began preaching as a Universalist, and continued thus until 1854, when, his voice failing, he engaged in the lumber and steam saw-mill business in Iowa, till 1859, and was then admitted to the bar at West Union; and since that time to the present, excepting the five years he was in the military service, he has practiced law. While in Cleveland, Ohio, he was Judge of...

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