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Tribes of the Pike’s Peak Region

It would be interesting to know who were the occupants of the Pike’s Peak region during prehistoric times. Were its inhabitants always nomadic Indians? We know that semi-civilized peoples inhabited southwestern Colorado and New Mexico in prehistoric times, who undoubtedly had lived there ages before they were driven into cliff dwellings and communal houses by savage invaders. Did their frontier settlements of that period ever extend into the Pike’s Peak region? The facts concerning these matters, we may never know. As it is, the earliest definite information we have concerning the occupants of this region dates from the Spanish exploring expeditions, but even that is very meager. From this and other sources, we know that a succession of Indian tribes moved southward along the eastern base of the Rocky Mountains during the two hundred years before the coming of the white settler, and that during this period, the principal tribes occupying this region were the Ute, Comanche, Kiowa, Cheyenne, Arapaho, and Sioux; and, further, that there were other tribes such as the Pawnees and Jicarilla Apache, who frequently visited and hunted in this region. Jicarilla Apache Indians of Colorado The Jicarilla Apaches are of the Athapascan stock, a widely distributed linguistic family, which includes among its branches the Navajos, the Mescalaro of New Mexico, and the Apaches of Arizona. Notwithstanding the fact that they were kindred people, the Jicarilla considered the latter tribes their enemies. However, they always maintained friendly relations with the Ute, and the Pueblos of northern New Mexico, and inter-marriages between members of these tribes were of frequent occurrence. The mother of Ouray, the noted Ute...

Indians of the Pike’s Peak Region

Including an Account of the Battle of Sand Creek, and of Occurrences in El Paso County, Colorado, during the War with the Cheyenne and Arapaho, in 1864 and 1868 For the most part this book is intentionally local in its character. As its title implies, it relates principally to the Indian tribes that have occupied the region around Pike’s Peak during historic times. The history, habits, and customs of the American Indian have always been interesting subjects to me. From early childhood, I read everything within my reach dealing with the various tribes of the United States and Mexico. In 186o, when I was fourteen years of age, I crossed the plains between the Missouri River and the Rocky Mountains twice, and again in 1861, 1865, and 1866; each time by ox or horse team, there being no other means of conveyance. At that time there were few railroads west of the Mississippi River and none west of the Missouri. On each of these trips I came more or less into contact with the Indians, and during my residence in Colorado from 186o to the present time, by observation and by study, I have become more or less familiar with all the tribes of this Western country. From 1864 to 1868, the Indians of the plains were hostile to the whites; this resulted in many tragic happenings in that part of the Pike’s Peak region embracing El Paso and its adjoining counties, as well as elsewhere in the Territory of Colorado. I then lived in Colorado City, in El Paso County, and took an active part in the defense...

Biography of Paul J. McBride

Every one who had had any relations with the Department of Labor in the state government during the last year realizes that Governor Capper could not have made a better ehoice for the office of State Labor Commission than when he selected Paul J. McBride for these important responsibilities. To his official duties Mr. McBride brought a long and varied experience, most of it obtained in the ranks of organized labor. He is in close touch with the men who toil and he also had that breadth of mind and sympathies which are the fruit of association with people and affairs in more than one field of work and in more than one locality. He had been a farmer, a machinist, both a worker and an employer, and for many years was active in railroad service. He was born in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, June 8, 1860, one of four children, all of whom are still living, and whose parents were David N. and Jane (Clarke) McBride. His father was born in Lawrence County and his mother in Washington County, Pennsylvania. When a young man David N. McBride learned the tailor’s trade, but most of his career was spent as a farmer. When the news of the discovery of gold on the Pacific coast reached his part of the county, he was one of those who eagerly accepted the opportunity to become an argonaut, and joined a company of men at Pittsburg in 1849. They proceeded by boat as far as St. Joseph, Missouri, where they outfitted, and their party combined with others to the number of about 250. This...

Biography of Alonzo Leo Fitzporter, M. D.

Dr. Alonzo Leo Fitzporter, physician and surgeon of St. Louis, in which city he was born July 23, 1884, is a son of Dr. John L. Fitzporter, who passed away June 15, 1915, at the age of seventy-six years, having long figured prominently as a representative of the medical profession in this city. Dr. A. L. Fitzporter attended the parochial schools of St. Louis and afterward became a student in the St. Louis University, from which he was graduated with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1906 and then entered upon his medical course, winning his M. D. degree in 1910. Following his graduation he served for eighteen months as interne in the Alexian Brothers Hospital and in the St. Francis Hospital of Colorado Springs, Colorado. With his return to St. Louis he entered upon private practice and devoting his attention to the general work of the profession has made steady progress through the intervening years. He belongs to the St. Louis, Missouri State and American Medical Associations. During the World war he was a first lieutenant of the Medical Corps, stationed at Camp Lee, Petersburg, Virginia, volunteering for service in September, 1918, and receiving his honorable discharge in May, 1919. At Belleville, Illinois, February 8, 1911, Dr. Fitzporter was married to Miss Marie Krebs, a native of that place and a daughter of Otto and Mary (Guentz) Krebs. Dr. and Mrs. Fitzporter have become parents of a daughter, Mary Julia, born in Belleville, December 9, 1918. Of the Roman Catholic faith Dr. Fitzporter is identified with the cathedral and he belongs to the Knights of Columbus. His political...

Biography of Leonard R. Manley

The value of a useful trade, of making one’s energy count toward one thing, of forging steadily ahead, regardless of obstaeles and discouragements, finds emphatic expression in the life of Leonard R. Manley, president and manager of the Topeka Pure Milk Company, the largest concern dealing exclusively in milk in the State of Kansas. When Mr. Manley first came to Topeka, it was in a humble capacity, but he was a thorough master of his trade, and possessed the ambition, energy and ability to better and elevate himself, so that he had shapod his abilities to his needs, had made the most of his opportunities, and had finally taken his place among the leading business men of his adopted city. Mr. Manley was born at Nortonville, Jefferson County, Kansas, September 29, 1873, one of the five children born to George F. and Anna (Reed) Manley, natives respectively of Indiana and Missouri. His paternal grandfather was Garlington B. Manley, a native of Indiana, who took his family to Kansas in 1860 and located in Coffey County on a farm. The activities of the border ruffians in the period of the first year of the Civil war, however, caused him to give up his new home and moved, in 1862 to Leavenworth County, where he resided until 1885. In the latter year he went to Jefferson County, and there continued to reside until his death in 1892, The grandfather was a man of many sterling traits of character, was an industrious and successful farmer, and a citizen who was active in the affairs of his community. He was a democrat in...

Biographical Sketch of Albert Lehman Southworth

Albert Lehman Southworth, living retired at Longview, represents one of the old and substantial families of Champaign County, his people having located here more than sixty years ago and having played worthy and active parts in the development and transformation of Raymond Township. Mr. Southworth was born in Erie County, Ohio, August 14, 1850, son of John Randolph and Anna (Akers) Southworth. His father was a Connecticut man by birth while his mother was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. It was in 1855 that the family came to Champaign County and settled on a tract of raw and unimproved land in section 29, Raymond Township. The father lived there and cultivated the soil until his death in 1885, while the mother passed away in 1893. They were the parents of six children: Mary Adelaide, widow of Martin B. Reed, living in Colorado; Julia Ann, deceased; Horace Franklin, deceased; Albert L.; John J., of Danville, Illinois; and May Lilly, wife of James Watts, of Fairland. Albert L. Southworth has had an active career, was reared on the home farm in Raymond Township, attended the local schools, and at the age of twenty-three left home and went to Parsons, Kansas, where he lived on a farm for seven years. His next experience was near Soda Springs, Colorado, where he spent three years as a miner. On returning to Champaign County he rented the home place for about three years, and again went back to Kansas and did farming for seven years. Since then he has lived at Longview and is retired. Mr. Southworth is a Democrat in...

Biography of John Howard

JOHN HOWARD. – Certainly one of the earliest pioneers of this favored region and a man who has endured the deprivations and hardships incident to that life, meanwhile laboring for the opening up of the frontier and the establishment of good government, the subject of this sketch has earned for himself a place in the history of Union county that is enviable and prominent, while personally he has ever manifested a good spirit and uprightness coupled with stanch principles and practical judgment in both the efforts put forth to build up the county, and in the prosecution of his own private affairs. Mr. Howard was born in east Tennessee on October 17, 1839, being the son of Enos J. and Mary J. Howard. While yet a child he was taken by his parents to Platte county, Missouri, near Kansas City, and there he remained until 1858. In that summer he engaged with a government train as teamster to Salt Lake City, where he viewed the country and made explorations until the following year and then returned to Missouri. In 1860 he went to Pike’s Peak and there followed mining for two years. In 1862 he came to northeastern Oregon, traveling first over the Grande Ronde country and then going to Canyon City, where he assisted to erect the first log cabin in that now prosperous town. After that work he went to digging the treasure of the place mines for a short time and then repaired to the Willamette valley, spending the winter of 1862-3 in that well known country. The following spring he came back to the Grande...

Biographical Sketch of Louis Smithnight

Smithnight, Louis; retired; born, Saxony, Germany, Dec. 16, 1834; son of Frederick and Auralia (Woolford) Smithnight; public school education in Germany; came to the United States at 15; married, 1866, Nettie Kingsley of Cleveland; surviving issue, one daughter; after a brief period in Columbus, O., came to Cleveland for A. J. Wenham, dry goods, for seven years; in 1858, went to Pike’s Peak, Col., to search for gold; being unsuccessful, returned to Cleveland, and opened a drug store, which conducted business until 1892; still own store at 2511 E. 9th St.; enlisted in 1861 as a private in the Cleveland Light Artillery; became corporal, took part in many engagements, and captured the first Confederate cannon (now in the Public Square of Cleveland); after three months, returned to Cleveland; reenlisted in 1862, in the Army of the Cumberland, under Gen. Rosecrans; served until 1863, retiring as captain, account disability; in 1873, reorganized the Cleveland Light Artillery, as commander; later organization was known as Battery A; organized the Ottawa Shooting Club, near Sandusky, 0.; member Chamber of Commerce, Concordia Lodge, F. & A. M., Grand Army of the Republic; Revenue Inspector of the U. S. two years for Ohio, Michigan and Indiana; three years State Inspector of oil; always held a prominent place in Military...

Fellers, Phillip L., Jr. – Obituary

Phillip Fellers Jr., 32, Colorado Springs, Colo., formerly of Fort Dodge, died Thursday [August 11, 1988] of a gunshot wound at St. Francis Hospital, Colorado Springs, Colo. Services will be 10:30 a.m. Tuesday at First United Methodist Church with the Rev. Roger Madden officiating. Burial will be in North Lawn Cemetery, with flag presentation by V.F.W. Post No. 1856. Survivors include his parents, Phil and Pat Fellers and Lorene E. and Kenneth Tegland, all of Fort Dodge; grandparents, T. P. and Kathryn Fellers, Fort Dodge; brothers Raymond Fellers, Douglas Fellers and Michael Tegland, all of Fort Dodge, and Michael Fellers, San Diego, Calif.; sisters Tina Meyer, Ames; Tina Fellers, Tonya Fellers and Rhonda Tegland, all of Fort Dodge. He was born in Fort Dodge; educated in Fort Dodge schools, and graduated from Fort Dodge High School in 1973. He worked as an auto mechanic in Fort Dodge, and served in the U. S. Marine Corps from 1976-1979. He then returned to Fort Dodge, where he continued working as an auto mechanic. He moved to Colorado Springs, Colo., in 1985. He worked as an auto mechanic there. Contributed by: Shelli...

Biography of George H. Grimmell, M. D.

George H. Grimmell, M. D. One of the first graduates of medicine to set up in practice at Howard, Kansas, was Dr. George H. Grimmell, who rendered his first professional services in that section of Elk County thirty years ago. With the exception of about eight years spent at Onaga, Doctor Grimmell had been continuously in practice at Howard since 1898, and is accounted one of the most competent surgeons in that locality. The first authentic records of his ancestry is found in the annals of the first crusade of 1096, A. D. There was a Sir John Von Grimmell, who was one of the enthusiastic Germans who joined as followers of the Cross in the endeavor to wrest Jerusalem from the hands of the Moslems. The line of descent from this crusader is traced directly to Dr. George H. Grimmell of Kansas. There is also a coat of arms in the family, and it is a reproduction of Baron Grimmell’s insignia as found in the year 1555. The coat consists of shield, quarterings, mantling, helmet, coronet and crest. Those versed in the science of heraldry can find in this coat of arms significant traces of the original Von Grimmell’s services as a crusader. Doctor Grimmell gets his profession naturally, since for several generations the Grimmell family have produced capable medical practitioners. He is a grandson of Henry Charles Augustus Grimmell, who was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany. He was given a liberal education and was learned in all the branches of science then included in the physician and surgeon’s arts. He practiced in Germany for some...
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