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Biography of William E. Durant

William E. Durant. Few citizens of Clay County are better known than William E. Durant, who is clerk of the District Court, a veteran of the Civil war, and a representative and bearer of a name that had been honorably known in this state for over a half century. He was born in Will County, Illinois, April 25, 1843. His parents were Edward T. and Sally Ann (Whallon) Durant, and his paternal grandparents were Edward and Lucina (Willey) Durant, natives of New York. The Durant ancestors went from France to England and in colonial days came to the United States and located in Connecticut, a later generation moving to New York and those still later establishing homes in Kansas. Edward T. Durant, father of William E., was born in Geneseo County, New York, in 1819. His father died when he was young and he remained in Geneseo County until 1837, when he became a pioneer in Will County, Illinois. He engaged in farming fox a time and then worked at the carpenter trade until 1861, when he enlisted for service in the Civil war, entering the Thirty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He participated in many battles and was in the siege of Vicksburg and in much of the military activity along the border west of the Mississippi River. He was honorably discharged and was mustered out December 7, 1865. In the spring of 1866 he came to Monrovia, Kansas, and worked at his trade there until 1869, when he removed to Waterville in Marshall County, and there he died in 1915. He supported the principles of the republican party, belonged...

Biography of Charles Daniel Ise

Charles Daniel Ise, a prominent lawyer and now county attorney of Montgomery County, had an individual record worthy of mention in this history of Kansas, and also represents a family which have many claims to distinction, some of them gained in this state, and others back in the Germen fatherland where the ancestors for generations were of the nobility. In Germany the name was spelled Eisenmenger. The family seat for generations had been in the Kingdom of Wnerternberg, and they had been members of the noble classes in that kingdom from the fourteenth century. One of the family was hero of the book known as “The Man of the Iron Hand.” The grandfather of the Independence attorney was Christopher Eisenmenger, who, in the decade of the ’40s, was considered the richest citizen of the Kingdom of Wuertemberg, owning controlling interests in every brick and tile manufacturing establishment in that country. He participated in all the wars of Germany in his time, and it is said that his father was slain in the battle of Waterloo. Christopher Eisenmenger was a very progressive man and advocated and to some degree brought about reform far in advance of his time. Partly for this and also for religious reasons he fell into the disfavor of the ruling house of Hohenzollern, and all his property was confiscated and he was left practically bankrupt when Henry Ise, father of Charles D., was sixteen years of age. Christopher Eisenmenger had seven children, one of whom died in Germany. After the family became bankrupt, three of them came to America: Henry; John, who was a Baptist minister...

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