Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Chalkley M. Beeson

The recent death of Buffalo Bill brings to mind how few of the old western plainamen are left. One of the best known to Kansans of that picturesque class of Americans is alive and vigorous at Dodge City, and Chalkley M. Beeson, although he has rubbed shoulders with Generals Custer and Sheridan, Buffalo Bill and the Grand Duke Alexis (sou of a Russian czar), and was, during the earlier period of his manhood, an active flgure in the unrecorded movies of the wild and woolly West, has been settled these many years as a solid, prosperous farmer and state legislator of Ford County. He is a native of Salem, Ohio, born April 24, 1848; went to Denver in April, 1868; came to Kansas from Colorado in 1875, and has made stock raising the serious business of his life ever since. He has represented Ford County in four legislatures–those of 1903, 1905 and 1907, and the special session of 1908. The following sketch is pertinent: “The life of Mr. Beeson bridges the gap between the old and the new of the great plains. Leaving his home in Ohio as a boy of nineteen years, he has lived to see the Wild West supplanted by the Civilised West; as he says, ‘the white-face and short-horn steers replace the buffalo, and wheat, and corn, and alfalfa, supplant the buffalo grass.’ For many years he lived an adventurous life, but finally settled down at Dodge City in the cattle business. As the old ranges were broken up, he acquired land of his own, and he is now one of the wealthy men of...

Biographical Sketch of Robert M. Wright

Robert M. Wright, a prominent resident of Dodge City, has prospered as a farmer, stockman, merchant and public servant. He is a native of the South, born in Bladensburg, Prince George County, Maryland, September 2, 1840. His father, who was born at Alexandria, Virginia, in 1800, often recounted his experlence as a boy on the battlefield of Bladensburg administering to wounded American soldiers. Mr. Wright’s great grandfather was a Prdsbyterian minister in Revolutionary times and raised a regiment of plowboys at Elizabethtown, New Jersey, of which he had command at the battle of the Meadows. The British had a price on his head and destroyed his property and the Tories finally killed him. His wife was shot by Hessian soldiers as she sat at a window with her baby. Elias B. Caldwell, the maternal grandfather, was clerk of the United States Supreme Court at Washington for many years, and when the capitol was destroyed by the British in the War of 1812 his library, which he had loaned to Congress, was also burned. Mr. Wright came West when sixteen years of age, and until 1859 lived on a farm near St. Louis. In 1850 he took an overland trip to Denver, and during the following eight years, as a trader and a contractor for hauling grain and cutting hay and wood, he crossed the plains four times by wagon and twice by coach. In 1867 he became a post trader at Fort Dodge, and has since resided at that locality. During that period he has served as postmaster, has represented Dodge County in the Legislature for four terms. and...

Biography of William Edward Davis

William Edward Davis is the youngest state auditor Kansas had ever had and one of the youngest men who ever held such an official dignity in any of the states. It may also be added, to express a general opinion current at the capital and over the state, that Mr. Davis’ administration as suditor had been a synonym of efficiency and economy. He represents that splendid type of young American manhood which had drawn attention by its capacity for accomplishment. Though most of his life had been spent in the Middle West, he was born in West Virginia, and his ancestors had lived there for several generations. He was born on a farm in Hampshire County, July 14, 1875, a son of John William and Hannah Catherine (Timbrook) Davis. His paternal grandfather, Eli Davia, was born in what is now Hardy County, West Virginia, then Old Virginia. He married a Miss Evans. Gipson P. Timbrook, the maternal grandfather, married a Miss Hott. John W. Davis was born in Hardy County, West Virginia, May 26, 1851, while his wife was born in Hampshire County, July 12, 1854. Both parenta are still living, residents of Shawnee County, Kansas, removing there from Carroll County, Missouri, in November, 1915, and they naturally take much pride in the accomplishments of their son. When William E. Davis was nine years old, his parents moved to Carroll County, Missouri, and he grew up there on a farm. The limited advantages of the country schools he supplemented by attendance at Avalon College in Livingston County, Missouri. Leaving school at the age of twenty he became clerk in the...

Biography of Samuel V. Mallory

Samuel V. Mallory, now superintendent of the city schools of Morrill, Brown County, had been a, Kansas educator for many years. He had been connected at different times with the public schools of three states–Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma–and both as a teacher and administrator his work rests upon the seeure foundation of sincere and effective service. Mr. Mallory had lived in Kansas since early youth and he represents some of the best elements of American ancestry. His great-grandfather, John William Mallory, spent his life in Virginia, having been born near Harper’s Ferry. He married Elizabeth peyton, who was the daughter of an officer in the Revolutionary war. Mr. Mallory’s grandfsther was Valentine Roger Mallory, who was born at Harper’s Ferry in Virginia in 1797, and moved from that state to Sangamon County, Illinois, near the capital at Springfield, and was an early farmer in that district. He died at Springfield in 1866. His wife was Nancy Dawson, a native of Kentucky. Several generations of the family were represented in and around Springfield, Illinois, and it was in that city that Samuel V. Mallory was born April 16, 1856. His father is the venerable R. U. Mallory, who was born at Springfield in 1828 and is still living, nearly ninety years of age, at Morrill, Kansas. He grew up and married at Springfield, became a farmer, and in 1871 migrated to Kansas and located in Ottawa in Franklin County. Subsequently he pre-empted 160 acres in Jewell County and only recently left his farm to take up a retired residence in shawnee, Oklshoma. He had been a republican since the organization...

Biography of Herman Genthe

Herman Genthe. The oldest bakery establishment of Topeka under one continuous ownership and management is that conducted by Mr. Herman Genthe, who now had associated with him his oldest son. Mr. Genthe is a master of his trade. He learned it as a boy in Germany, where his ancestors so far as known were millers and had a great deal to do with those grains that furnish the staple food stuffs, wheat and rye. Mr. Genthe’s talent as a maker of fine bread is therefore partly an inheritance from his ancestors, though it had been developed by his individual experience covering many years. He was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1857, a son of Wilhelm Genthe and a grandson of Gottlieb Genthe. His grandfather was born in 1793 and the family as far as it can be traced lived in Saxony. Wilhelm Genthe died in Saxony in 1890. Reared and educated in his native country, Herman Genthe at the age of twenty-four in 1881 left Germany and made the voyage to America. Landing in Baltimore. he was soon afterward in Waco, Texas, and visited a number of other Texas towns. Later he was in Kansas City, Missouri, then in Chicago, Illinois, and returning to Kansas, began going about among the towns and country communities of the state. and for several years in the early ‘8Os was employed at different places, including Lazine, Topeka, Sedan, in Chautauqua County, Coolidge and Dodge City. Since 1887 Mr. Genthe had made Topeka his permanent home. In that year he started the bakery business which he still conducts, though from time to time new...

Biography of Elmer Eugene Kelley

E. E. Kelley during his thirty years of residence in Kansas had played a varied and honorable part in affairs, as an educator, farmer, and, in more recent years, as editor and publisher. He is now head of the Toronto Republican and a former president of the Kansas State Editorial Association. Taken in connection with what he had accomplished himself in life, Mr. Kelley may take a reasonable degree of pride in his American ancestry. The Kelley family goes back to Ireland. While the population of America was still straggling along the Atlantic coast in thirteen colonies, James Kelley emigrated from Ireland and settled in Virginia. His ardent sympathies with the cause of the country led him to take part in the Revolutionary war, and he served as an officer of a Virginia regiment. William Kelley, a son of this revolutionary officer, was born at Harper’s Ferry, Virginia, in 1775. He, too, took a part in one of our nation’s wars, and having in the meantime moved from Virginia to Ohio he served in Company A of the First Ohio Militia during the War of 1812. He was with the troops under General Hull at Detroit, when that stronghold was surrendered to the British forces. He afterwards followed farming in Ohio, and moved from that state to Warren County, Indiana, where he died in 1863. William Kelley married Susan McPherson. She was an aunt of the Civil war hero, General McPherson, who was killed at Atlanta, Georgia. Two of the ancestors of Mr. Kelley have been mentioned, and a third is another William Kelley, who was his grandfather. Grandfather...

Talbott, William Edward – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon William Edward Talbott, 90, of La Grande died Dec. 2 at a local care center. A funeral service is planned for 1 p.m. Friday at Daniels Chapel of the Valley. Burial will follow at the Hillcrest East Cemetery. Viewing will be conducted from 4 to 6 p.m Thursday at Daniels Chapel of the Valley. Mr. Talbott was born Dec. 17, 1915, to Clarence and Hattie Short Talbott in Dodge City, Kan. At an early age his family traveled by touring car to La Grande, where they settled and he attended school. On Sept. 1, 1935, he married Mary Svetich. He worked for the Oregon Highway Department and in the Portland shipyards for a time before moving back to La Grande. He worked as an electrician for Eastern Oregon University for 18 years until his retirement in July 1977. He was a member of Our Lady of the Valley Catholic Church, The Knights of Columbus and the electricians union. Mr. Talbott was a great historian and shared many stories with children in area schools. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, camping and woodworking, and he loved the mountains. Survivors include his wife, Mary of La Grande; siblings, Grace Carpenter of Lewiston, Idaho, and Manson Talbott of Battle Ground, Wash.; and numerous nieces and nephews and other relatives. Dying earlier were a daughter, Virginia Talbott; and siblings, Hershel Talbott, Ernie Talbott, Pauline Yohn and June Christensen. Memorial contributions may be made to a charity of choice in care of Daniels Chapel of the Valley, 1502 Seventh St., La Grande 97850. The Observer-Obituaries for the week ending Dec. 9, 2006, Published:...

Dryden, Thomas W. – Obituary

Baker City, Baker County, Oregon Thomas W. Dryden, 95, of Baker City, died Jan. 2, 2003, at St. Elizabeth Health Care Center. At his request, there will be no funeral services. Disposition was by cremation at Gray’s West Pioneer Crematory. Mr. Dryden was born Feb. 16, 1907, in Dodge City, Kan., to Charles W. Dryden and Rose Bell (Arbuckle) Dryden. He was the youngest of three children. When he was quite young, the family moved to Indiana, several years later to Arizona, and on to southern California. He married Doris E. Smith on Sept. 12, 1931, in Yuma, Ariz., and settled in Escondido, Calif., where he had been working for the Matzen Ranches since the mid-1920s, raising avocados and oranges until his retirement in the mid-1970s. Mr. Dryden was a past member of BPOE in Escondido. He was an outdoors person and loved camping and fishing with their friends. He and Doris moved to Baker City in 1997 to be near their daughter and son-in-law. He was loved and very respected by all who were fortunate enough to know him. Survivors include his wife of 71 years, Doris, of Baker City; daughter and son-in-law, Mickie and Skip Bell of Baker City; grandchildren, Sue Tessler and husband, Marc, of Santee, Calif., Tomi Jo Giedeman and her brother, Bob, of San Diego, Calif., Laurie Cantrell of Ruidoso Downs, N.M., Dakin Bell and his wife, Erin, of Seattle, Wash., and Stacy Bell of Portland; nieces, Earlyne Swanson and husband, Jim, of Escondido, Calif., Rosemary Sams and husband, Ed, of Yreka, Calif.; nine great-grandchildren; three great-great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was...

Dielman, Byrdie “Opal” Shropshire Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Byrdie “Opal” Dielman, 85, died Sept. 12, 2002, at St. Elizabeth Care Center, where she had been a resident for three weeks. Her memorial service will be at 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 23, at the United Methodist Church, 1919 Second St. Opal, the first of six children of Robert David and Hazel Viola Fox Shropshire, was born on Jan. 14, 1917, at the family farm near Ashland, Kan., 50 miles south of Dodge City. She obtained her education there graduating as valedictorian of the Ashland High School class of 1935. She married Raymond “Ray” Charles Dielman, who also grew up in Ashland, on April 18, 1936. That summer the couple, along with another newlywed couple, Tom and Beth Window, migrated together in Ray’s Model A Ford to Boise, Idaho, where the couple’s first two children were born. In January 1943, the family moved to Baker City, where Ray had taken a job with the Railway Postal Service. In 1945, Ray shipped out to the South Pacific and Opal went to work for C. C. Anderson, a large department store in the 2100 block of Main Street. In 1951, she left the work force to have a third child, returning to work in 1956 as a timber resource clerk for the U. S. Forest Service until her retirement in 1975. Opal was a member of the United Methodist Church from her arrival in Baker City in 1943 until her death, serving many years as church treasurer. In the early 1950s Opal volunteered as an aircraft spotter atop Antlers Hotel as part of a nationwide early warning system...

Gaede, Baker & Co.

Gaede, Baker & Co., dealers in a general line of fancy dry goods, clothing and gents furnishing goods and livestock. They opened trade January 1, 1882, and carry a stock of $6,000 and employ one clerk in the business. The individual names of the firm are Richard Gaede, H. C. Baker and S. H. Fields. H. C. Baker first came to Dodge City January 1, 1882. He was born at Logansport, Cass Co., Ind., September 16, 1849. The family moved to Nemaha County, Neb., in 1856, where he was raised in a small village. He first began business in life as a clerk in a store at Brownville, Neb., and has always followed mercantile pursuits. He went to Atchison County, Mo., in 1874, and clerked in a dry goods store for some time, when he purchased a third interest in the same and continued for three years. He then became a member of the firm of Gaede, Baker & Co., until he came to Dodge City. He was married in May 1877, to Miss Bertha Renner, of Rockport, Mo. They have two children – Nellie and...
Page 1 of 212

Pin It on Pinterest