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Biographical Sketch of Lucy Clark

(See Ward and Duncan) Lucy A. Clark, born February 7, 1848, on Beattie’s Prairie, Delaware District. Married December 25, 1869, Joshua Bertholf Duncan, born December 13, 1835. He died December 14, 1875. She married August 30, 1877, James Abercrombie Duncan, born June 3, 1825, and died December 26, 1898. Mrs. Duncan’s children are: Deden Rosecrans, born March 25, 1874; Annie, born April 7, 1876; Jimmie A., born October 30, 1879; Lucy Elizabeth, born March 14, 1884; and Charles DeWitt Duncan, born April 10,...

Slave Narrative of Rosa Barber

Interviewer: William Webb Tuttle Person Interviewed: Rosa Barber Location: Muncie, Indiana Place of Birth: North Carolina Date of Birth: 1861 Place of Residence: 812 South Jefferson Muncie, Indiana Submitted by: William Webb Tuttle District No. 2 Muncie, Indiana SLAVES IN DELAWARE COUNTY ROSA BARBER 812 South Jefferson Muncie, Indiana Rosa Barber was born in slavery on the Fox Ellison plantation at North Carden[TR:?], in North Carolina, in the year 1861. She was four [HW: ?] years old when freed, but had not reached the age to be of value as a slave. Her memory is confined to that short childhood there and her experiences of those days and immediately after the Civil War must be taken from stories related to her by her parents in after years, and these are dimly retained. Her maiden name was Rosa Fox Ellison, taken as was the custom, from the slave-holder who held her as a chattel. Her parents took her away from the plantation when they were freed and lived in different localities, supported by the father who was now paid American wages. Her parents died while she was quite young and she married Fox Ellison, an ex-slave of the Fox Ellison plantation. His name was taken from the same master as was hers. She and her husband lived together forty-three years, until his death. Nine children were born to them of which only one survives. After this ex-slave husband died Rosa Ellison married a second time, but this second husband died some years ago and she now remains a widow at the age of seventy-six years. She recalls that the master...

Slave Narrative of Betty Guwn

Interviewer: William Webb Tuttle Person Interviewed: Betty Guwn Location: Muncie, Indiana Place of Birth: Kentucky Date of Birth: March 25, 1832 Place of Residence: 1101 East Second Street Muncie, Indiana Submitted by: William Webb Tuttle District No. 2 Muncie, Indiana NEGRO SLAVES IN DELAWARE COUNTY MRS. BETTY GUWN MRS. HATTIE CASH, DAUGHTER, residing at 1101 East Second Street Muncie, Indiana Mrs. Betty Guwn was born March 25, 1832, as a slave on a tobacco plantation, near Canton, Kentucky. It was a large plantation whose second largest product was corn. She was married while quite young by the slave method which was a form of union customary between the white masters. If the contracting parties were of different plantations the masters of the two estates bargained and the one sold his rights to the one on whose plantation they would live. Her master bought her husband, brought him and set them up a shack. Betty was the personal attendant of the Mistress. The home was a large Colonial mansion and her duties were many and responsible. However, when her house duties were caught up her mistress sent her immediately to the fields. Discipline was quite stern there and she was “lined up” with the others on several occasions. Her cabin home began to fill up with children, fifteen in all. The ventilation was ample and the husband would shoot a prowling dog from any of the four sides of the room without opening the door. The cracks between the logs would be used by cats who could step in anywhere. The slaves had “meetin'” some nights and her mistress would...

Biography of Christopher Columbus Michal

C. C. Michal, for the past fifteen years, had been one of the extensive contractors in Southern Kansas, though his work had been done in various parts of the state. His home and headquarters are at Independence, where he is recognized as one of the substantial citizens. Mr. Michal went to the border with the Kansas National Guards, Company K, Second Infantry, as a sergeant and served three months. His ancestors came originally from Ireland and were early settlers in the United States. They located very early in the nineteenth century in Western Indiana near Terre Hante, where Philip Michal, father of the Independence contractor, was born in 1828. Philip Michal was reared and married in Indiana and lived there as a farmer for many years. From that state he enlisted in 1861 as a member of the Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry, and was in service until the close of the war. In one engagement he was wounded by a burating shell and never fully recovered from his wounds. However, he participated in some of the greatest battles and campaigns of the war, including Shiloh, Vicksburg, the march to the sea with Sherman, and all the battles of that campaign. Once he was taken prisoner and confined in the notorious Andersonville until exchanged. He was mustered out with the rauk of first sergeant. Some years after the war he left his Indiana farm and in 1882 moved to Cherryvale, Kansas, where he was an early settler and where he continued farming and stock raising until his death in 1896. He was a republican and was honored with various township offices....

Biography of Abraham Buckles Jetmore

Abraham Buckles Jetmore. The late Abraham Buckles Jetmore was one of the most forceful figures of the Kansas bar from the year 1878 until his death, March 1, 1908. During that period he gave his strength, mind, heart and talents to the upbuilding of his adopted city and state, and while engaged in discharging the duties related to a large and important practice, gave his best efforts to the cause of prohibition and toward the establishment of an honest public administration. Mr. Jetmore was born at Muncie, Delaware County, Indiana, May 25, 1837, the seventh son of John Isaac and Mary (Brannon) Jetmore. His father was born in Prussia and was educated at Frankfort-on-Main, Germany, and came to America when eighteen years of age. His mother was the daughter of a Revolutionary soldier, John Brannon, and his wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Haborn (also sometimes spelled Haburn and Haighbourgne). The Brannons were Lrish and direct descendants from the Brannon family of Irish kings, this family being able to trace its ancestry back to the year 745. Abraham B. Jetmore received his early education in the public schools of his native city, and in order to secure funds with which to complete his training taught school for several years. Thus he was enabled to attend the Muncie (Indiana) Seminary, from which he was duly graduated, and in 1858 he was admitted to the bar of his native state. Later he was admitted to practice in the Federal courts, as also those of the states of Missouri and Kansas, where he always stood among the leaders of his...

Biography of Harry S. Brown

Harry S. Brown. A lawyer of twenty years’ experience, Harry S. Brown has been identified with the Coffeyville bar the greater part of his professional career and he has shown a remarkable capacity for handling litigation entrusted to him and is a leading citizen as well as a lawyer. He represents an old Indiana family of English origin. His first American ancestors came to South Carolina in colonial times. Through his grandmother Mr. Brown is of Scotch descent. One of his Brown ancestors was a captain in the English navy and lost his life at sea. His grandfather, John Brown, died near Frankfort, Indiana, and was a native of South Carolina, having established his home on a farm in the Hoosier state during the ’30s. Mr. Harry S. Brown was born at Wanamaker, Indiana, September 16, 1870. His father, Samuel M. Brown, was born in South Carolina in 1822, and was about eight years of age when his parents moved to the vicinity of Frankfort, Indiana. He became a physician and surgeon, graduating M. D. from the Cincinnati Medical College and practiced continuously and usefully at Wanamaker for a period of fifty-six years. He was a democrat, very active in the Baptist Church, a member of the Masonic fraternity and at one time was a candidate for the State Legislature. Dr. Brown’s first wife was a Miss Brady, who died at Wanamaker, leaving the following children: Henry J., a merchant, who died at Wanamaker in 1915; Edorns O., a money broker at Indianapolis; Corydon S., a physician and surgeon at Wanamaker; Arthur V., an attorney and a member of...

Biography of A. C. Shaffer

A. C. Shaffer. Necessary requisites of a good newspaper man in these modern days are trained faculties and an enlightened understanding. The world at large, in greater and greater degree is requiring educated men, not alone for the learned professions, but also for those along less trained lines, and it is an important part of the work of the newspapers throughout the country to furnish the mental stimulus without which none can hope to succeed. Particularly does this apply to the newspapers which circulate through the smaller cities and in the country districts, and one of the papers which had accepted and is carrying out this work is the Tri-City Herald, of Gas City, Kansas, the proprietor of which, A. C. Shaffer, is not only a man of broad information and progressive spirit, but a newspaper man of long experience, who had gained his training through all the departments of newspaper work. Mr. Shaffer was born at Muncie, Indiana, September 21, 1878, and is a son of Noah and Charlotte (Longenecker) Shaffer. The Shaffer family originated in Germany and was founded in Pennsylvania during colonial days. In that state was born the grandfather of A. C. Shaffer, who was a minister of the Universalist Church and died at Dayton, Ohio, at the remarkable age of one hundred and two years. Noah Shaffer was born in 1832, at Dayton, Ohio, and was there reared and educated, going as a young man to Germantown, Ohio, where he was married. Later he removed to the City of Muncie, Indiana, where he became chief of the Muncie Fire Department, and held that post...

Cheesman, Clinton J. – Obituary

Clinton J. Cheesman, 76, 1415 No. Mulberry St., Hartford City, died at 5:15 a.m. this morning, September 2, 1980, at Ball Memorial Hospital where he had been hospitalized since August 11. A retired rural mail carrier, Mr. Cheesman, was a former county assessor for Blackford County and a member of the Mental Health Board. He was a member of the IOOF Lodge, the Masonic Lodge, Scottish Rite, Shrine and York Rite as well as member of Trinity United Methodist Church. Mr. Cheesman was born August 1, 1904 in Delaware County, the son of Alva A. Cheesman and Lydia B. Hinsley. He married Dorothy M. Gross in Hartford City, April 4, 1926. His wife is presently residing in the Country Manor Nursing Home. Survivors other than his wife, Dorothy, are two daughters, Dora Belle Cheesman and Mrs. Fostine (Merrill) Stanley, both of Hartford City, and one son, Rev. John A. Cheesman, Martinsville, Ind. Eight grandchildren and one great grandchild survives as do two brothers, Donald Cheesman and Alva Cheesman, both of Bluffton, and one sister, Mrs. Floyd (Helen) Bartlett, Albany. One sister and three brothers are deceased. Several nieces and nephews also survive. Friends may call at Keplinger Funeral Home after 2 p.m. Thursday. Services are scheduled for 10 a.m. Friday at the Trinity United Methodist Church with Rev. William Cutshaw officiating. Burial will follow in Gardens of Memory, Muncie. The Hartford City News Times, September 2, 1980 Contributed by: Shelli...

Biography of Miles Shoemaker

Miles Shoemaker is the owner of a twenty-acre tract on the east side of Riverside Avenue, about two and a half miles south of Riverside. He purchased land in 1882 from Mrs. Hattie S. Travers, and in the same year commenced making improvements upon the place by planting citrus and deciduous fruits and vines. About live acres of his laud lies east of the upper canal, and is not susceptible of irrigation from the Riverside water system. Upon this elevated portion he has erected his cottage residence and outbuildings. The balance of his land fifteen acres is all under cultivation. He has an orange grove of ten acres, the trees ranging in age from seven years to those planted in 1889. He has some of the finest trees to be found in his section, and has used great care in their pruning, fertilization and cultivation from their first planting. His vineyard of three and one-half acres has also received its share of his attention, and has been remarkably prolific in its yield. In 1888 this three and one-half acres and two and one-half acres of vines grown among his orange trees, produced a crop that sold for $1,100. In the same year his oranges brought him $790. In 1886 his raisin and orange crop sold for $2,200. He is a practical and successful horticulturist and is destined to have one of the most productive groves in Riverside. He has grown the greater portion of the nursery stock used in his orange-growing, and at this writing (1889) has a fine nursery stock with which to increase the area of his...

Biography of Peter Suman

Peter Suman, one of the most successful horticulturists of Riverside, came to this place in December, 1880, and established his residence on Vine street, between Second and Third streets, purchasing the two and one-half acre block. In the spring of 1881 he bought a ten-acre tract on the west side of Brockton Avenue, about a mile south of the business center of Riverside, and since that date has devoted himself to horticultural pursuits. In 1885 he erected a substantial and well-ordered cottage residence upon this place, and has since occupied it with his family. His orange grove is a noticeably fine one and well worthy of mention as a representative place. He has four acres of seedling orange trees, nineteen years old, and from twenty-two to twenty-five feet in height, with strong body and spreading branches, trees forming a head nearly twenty feet in diameter. As an illustration of the yield from these four acres, the amounts received from the sale of oranges during the past four years is given: In 1885, $1,300; in 1886, $900; in 1887, $1,350, and in 1888, $1,400. This is an average of over $300 per acre for a series of years. In addition to his seedlings there are 230 Mediterranean Sweets, 150 Washington Navels and 60 Australian Navels and St. Michaels in his grove, all remarkably fine trees, but varying in age from two years old to those in good bearing. He also has lemon and deciduous fruit trees, such as are required for family use. Mr. Suman makes orange-growing a study, constantly experimenting in budding, pruning, fertilizing, etc, and rarely makes a...
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