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Slave Narrative of David Lee

Person Interviewed: David Lee Location: Dade County, Florida David Lee, 1006 NW 1st Court, Miami, Fla. is proud of his “missus” and the training he received on the plantation. “Ah can’t tell y’ ‘zackkly mah age, but ah knows dat when Freedom was declared, ah was big ‘nough ter drive a haws an’ buggy’, for ah had nice folks. Ah could tell u’ right smart ’bout ’em. “Ah libbed near Cusper, Ga. on Barefield’s fahm. Dare daughter, Miss Ann Barefield, she taught a school few miles away, ’round pas’ the Post Hoffice. Ah s’posen ah mus’ bee 9 or 10 years hold, for ah’ carried Miss Ann backwards and forwards t’ school hev’ry marnin’ and den in the hevenin’, ah’d stop ’round fer de mails when ah’d go fer to carry her home. “Miss Ann, she used ter gibme money, but hi didn’t know what t’ do wid hit. Ah had all de clothes ah could we ah and all ah could eat and didn’t need playthings, couldn’t read much, and didn’t know where to buy any books. Ah had hit good. “When peace wuz signed, dey gib me lots of Confederate bills to play with. Ah had ten-dollah bills and lots o’ twenty-dollah bills, good bills, but y’know dey wus ‘t wuth nothing. Ah have a twenty-doll ah bill ‘roun som’ers, if hi could evah fin’ hit. “Yes, ah had hit good. My mothah, she stayed on de plantation, too. She did de churnin’ and she run de loom. She wuz a good weaver. Ah used ter help her run de loom. “We stayed on a while after...

Slave Narrative of Hattie Thomas

Person Interviewed: Hattie Thomas Location: Dade County, Florida Hattie Thomas was six years old when peace was declared. She was ‘borned’ near Custer, Ga. on Bob Morris’ plantation. At the tender age of five, she can remember of helping to care for the other children, some of whom were her own brothers and children, for her mother kept her eight children with her. Bob Morris’ plantation being a large one, the problem of feeding all the slaves and their children was, in itself, a large one. Hattie can well remember of ‘towing’ the milk to the long wooden troughs for the children. Her mother and the other servants would throw bread crusts and corn breads into the milk troughs and when they would become well-soaked, all the little slave-children would line up with their spoons. “So it happened that the ones who could eat the fastest would be the ones who would get the fattest. “We had a good plenty to eat and it didn’t make much difference how it was served. We got it just the same and didn’t know any better. “We stayed on after de ‘mancipation an’ ah wants t’ tell y’ ah worked hard in dose days. Of course, ah worked hardest after Peace wuz declared. “I wuz on dat plantation when there wuz no matches. Yes, dat wuz befo’ matches wuz made an’ many-a time ah started fire in de open fire place by knookin’ two stones together until I’d sen’ sparks into a wad o’cotton until it took fire. “Now, mind y’ this was on Bob Morrison’s plantation between Custard and Cotton Hill,...

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